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Unread 10-09-2010   #1 (permalink)
jbrupert is offline Rookie


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Default Break line leaking at banjo bolt, need suggestions

Hey guys,

I have a 1997 GT and recently I started to hear grinding noises from my back breaks (skipped squealing and went straight to grinding). I assumed it was simply my break pads needing replaced but when I pulled the wheel off on the passenger side I noticed that the roter had only been gouged on the inside and not the outside so I checked the caliper and found that one of the pins had seized in the bracket.

Considering that my car has 180k miles and the rear breaks have probably not gone through much maintenance I decided it was time to replace all the parts so I installed new calipers, brackets, roters, pads for the rear breaks on both sides. Then as I was trying to bleed the breaks the break line on the driver side started squirting out fluid at the banjo bolt where the break line meets the caliper.

Initially, I thought that the caliper I bought may have been defective so I replaced it with a new one and still had the same problem. Then after some searching I found a guy with the same problem who claimed that it was simply the copper washers on the banjo bolt as the new washer replacements were half the thickness of the originals and didn't thread the bolt like the originals. So I tried using the original washers like he did and no luck, it was still squirting out of the banjo bolt when I started the car and applied pressure to the system.

My next guess is that somehow the seal created by the banjo bolt and the cube housing against the caliper isn't happening so I'm thinking about using a new washer and sanding the cube housing smooth but if anyone has better suggestions (apart from replacing the brake line) I'd be very grateful.

Thanks,
Jon
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Unread 10-09-2010   #2 (permalink)
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Note, if the copper washers are re-used, usually they leak. However, it sounds like to me that there is not nearly enough clamping load to crush the washers. This is a big leak right?

Perhaps the bolt is bottoming out before the copper washers are crushed. To than end, thinner washers would be bad.

Perhaps the bolt could be shortened but that seems extream. Especially if any metal debris get into the system or the fluid passageways get blocked.

Sanding the banjo housing would make the problem worse. Which of course leads to another quesion. Could the diameter of the copper washers be too big and not fitting within the allocated space on the banjo?

The torque spec is 40 Nm (30 foot-lbs).
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Unread 10-09-2010   #3 (permalink)
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Just a thought. Somewhere along the way, the thread pitch was changed on the banjo bolt. Some MY's have fine thread and some have course thread.

Are you sure that the bolt matches the thread pattern in the caliper?
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Unread 10-09-2010   #4 (permalink)
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The leak is pretty serious, it literally squirts out about a foot of where the banjo fitting and the caliper meet. I have tried both old and new washer even thick and thin but nothing stops it. I even bought a new banjo bolt which is just a hair shorter than the original and still have the same problem.

It may be possible that the bolt is not the same thread as the caliper but I'm fairly certain that it is. I believe the issue is human error because when I tried to remove the original washers the first time I think I may have gouged the banjo fitting. So I guess that leads to the next question, how would I replace the banjo fitting itself? Would it require replacing the entire brake line?

Thanks,
Jon
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Unread 10-09-2010   #5 (permalink)
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The banjio fitting is part of the brake hose.
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Unread 10-09-2010   #6 (permalink)
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Default Solution

Yes the banjo fitting is part of the rear brake hose and the next step would have been to replace that hose (not thinking about the fact that its a special order part and I needed a fix today) but since I figured I had gouged the banjo fitting, causing the leak, when trying to remove the original washers from the banjo bolt, I took an oil stone to the banjo fitting and grinded it smoother and cranked the original bolt and new washers down into the caliper tighter than most would recommend. I bled the brakes and it didn't leak, started the car and got the hydraulic pressure going and still no leak. So I put everything back together and test drove it, brakes worked fine and no problems so far. Hope this solution helps anyone who has similar problems, though my advice is be careful not to damage the banjo fitting because it was a lot easier to do than i thought it would be.
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banjo bolt, bleeding, break line, caliper, leak



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