Strut rods/bushings - Ford Mustang Forum
 
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2016 Thread Starter
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Strut rods/bushings

Just had my new strut rods and bushings delivered.
I had to scrap the old ones because the threads were all corroded.
I removed and re-welded one new strut rod bracket (rusted) and getting ready to do strut rods, tie rod ends, ball joints, rubber bushings etc.
I removed the old strut rods and I just wanted to know how would I go about installing them correctly.
Do the strut rods have anything to do with alignment?
Should I tighten them up where they wind up to be once I get them in?
I didn't want to pull the wheels too far out of alignment
I marked and measured where the old strut rod nuts were at on the rod to see if I could get the new ones fairly close to where they were originally.
Any good info would be greatly appreciated.

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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Makedust View Post
Just had my new strut rods and bushings delivered.
I had to scrap the old ones because the threads were all corroded.
I removed and re-welded one new strut rod bracket (rusted) and getting ready to do strut rods, tie rod ends, ball joints, rubber bushings etc.
I removed the old strut rods and I just wanted to know how would I go about installing them correctly.
Do the strut rods have anything to do with alignment?
Should I tighten them up where they wind up to be once I get them in?
I didn't want to pull the wheels too far out of alignment
I marked and measured where the old strut rod nuts were at on the rod to see if I could get the new ones fairly close to where they were originally.
Any good info would be greatly appreciated.
From my understanding of the front end geometry, the strut rod length will have impact mostly in the caster alignment. Most of what you listed out there will end up impacting alignment to some degree - outer tie rods will impact toe, it's generally more cost effective and easier to do entire arms when replacing ball joints, and the upper arms are the primary alignment adjustment on the cars. With the strut rods and tie-rod ends, if you matched up the threads closely when you put in the new ones you probably won't throw the alignment too far out of whack, but if you do one thing, then another, it'll add up to a bit of change.

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-19-2016
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It depends on what year car you have, if 64-66, then no, it 67-?, then yes. So you might clue us on what year you have. Good Luck.
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016 Thread Starter
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It's an original unmodified 1970 sports roof with original suspension, 302, and drivetrain.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Makedust View Post
It's an original unmodified 1970 sports roof with original suspension, 302, and drivetrain.
Thanks for this information. Now, you should receive more responses. As was mentioned, caster will be thirst affected. Plan on an alignment appointment and preferably a shop familiar with our older front suspensions.
Good Luck....

Ken
Severna Park, MD
1964 1/2 Poppy Red Cvt Resto-Mod
333 cu.in, dual Webers, CI cam, TW heads,TRI-Ys, 3.55 rear, T5z, TCP susp., real leather seating
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016
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As others have already said on '67 up front ends , the strut rod IS adjustable and does change the caster . You are wise to have changed the strut rods a s they often break at the end of the threads. You will have to get it aligned after changing them out.

I may not be a GT350 Member but I am a GT 350 owner , stay thirsty my friends
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016
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Since you seem to be a DIYer have you considered doing the alignment yourself. There are a number of good tools out there. I use a product by a local company, SPC. Fastrax lets you set camber caster, and if you buy the extra add on part you can do toe as well. Local alignment shop that has a good reputation for being able to do older cars couldn't give me a hard quote so I said screw em, bought the fastrax, and taught myself. Car handles quite well
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fastback66 View Post
Since you seem to be a DIYer have you considered doing the alignment yourself. There are a number of good tools out there. I use a product by a local company, SPC. Fastrax lets you set camber caster, and if you buy the extra add on part you can do toe as well. Local alignment shop that has a good reputation for being able to do older cars couldn't give me a hard quote so I said screw em, bought the fastrax, and taught myself. Car handles quite well
I did an alignment on my car myself a few months back with the aid of an alignment rack. I'm just hoping he doesn't have headers that fit snuggly against the bolts on the upper arms.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016
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Are your new bushings rubber ? Make sure that they are rubber. Any other harder compound puts a tremendous stress on the strut rod. It is common for strut rods to break at the end of the threads when non-rubber strut rod bushings are used.

Z


Galaxie 500
'65 K code Mustang
& a few '66 GT350's (1970-2012)
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 05-20-2016 Thread Starter
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Thanks to everyone for the good info.
I plan on keeping it as original as possible.
I have the ball joints with control arms
I do plan on checking everything after I'm done and I will eventually take it for an alignment check if I can find a reputable place to take is to.
No polyurethane bushings, just what the car came with originally.
I haven't modded anything spectacular to the car yet, just polished heads, dual exhaust, mild cam.
I might do intake, 4V carb, headers, trac lok, and maybe power steering next year.
For now I just plan to enjoy it.
I do much of the work when I can, if I can.
I'm not a very trusting fellow she it comes to shops.
There are no more vintage car mechanics, the new guys are all looking for throttle body sensors, oxygen sensors, or places to plug in their diagnostic to see what codes come up (Really! In a 70's car? Babosos!).
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Another vote for doing the alignment yourself. No alignment shop will take the time that you will. There are workarounds for the very pricey tools like turntables, and the digital caster/camber gauges are very reasonably priced. Toe can be set very accurately with a string, or if you are doubting that, toe plates/measuring tape can be had for under a $100.

Z


Galaxie 500
'65 K code Mustang
& a few '66 GT350's (1970-2012)
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