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-   -   Should I sell my 2010? (https://www.allfordmustangs.com/forums/2005-2010-mustang-talk/1080191-should-i-sell-my-2010-a.html)

stang2010 04-18-2019 10:20 PM

Should I sell my 2010?
 
Hello all. I have a 2010 V6 Premium with 163,000 miles. It's completely stock. It's been my daily driver for over seven years. I've had no mechanical issues with the engine, transmission, etc. But the suspension has been very fragile. We've had to replace the control arms, bearings, and other small (and expensive) parts of the suspension nearly 10 times now, and it's always a huge expense. I just had to spend $600 on the suspension and another $700 on replacing all the brake pads and rotors.

I really love this car, but this is the third $1000+ repair I've had to do in the last year and a half. The car is only worth $4500-$6500 according to KBB. How much life can I expect out of it - can it reach 200,000 miles? At what point do I need to stop pouring money into it and sell it?

kenv 04-18-2019 11:46 PM

With the proper maintenance your car should be able to go 2-300,000 + miles. What you have described are "wear" items & they are going to wear out & need replacing on any vehicle. Some sooner than later. Good luck.

Travis98146 04-19-2019 12:10 AM

From the ownership and mileage there seems to be a serious issue. Your stock original suspension should last at least 80,000 miles, unless: bad roads, curb-jumping, off-roading, course racing, modifications or driving techniques (super hard cornering). Even if you happen to have a factory "lemon", suspension repairs should last 80K, if they're done right.

ONEZ ST 04-19-2019 12:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stang2010 (Post 9230547)
. . . . . .

I really love this car, but this is the third $1000+ repair I've had to do in the last year and a half. The car is only worth $4500-$6500 according to KBB. How much life can I expect out of it - can it reach 200,000 miles? At what point do I need to stop pouring money into it and sell it?

There is no set rule except "Eriks Law" (me) places a limit on repairs at 25% of purchase price. So a $30,000 auto gets $7500 in repairs and then I make a personal decision to keep it or get rid of it.

I do not count tires or oil servicing or insurance claims.

I replace front suspension parts at 100,000 miles. Struts, strut bushings, Strut Boots, tie rods, and alignment. Ball joints and control arms only if worn. Just my pet peeve because that is the mileage my nerves are shot from the rattles of worn parts that are typically the struts or strut bearings. I buy parts at Rock Auto and pay labor for installation including an alignment.

Front brakes and new rotors also at 100,000. I've never had a set wear out. Rear brakes seem to last forever. Same source for parts -- -- Rock Auto.

Battery and Alternators are driven to failure and you will probably go through a battery or two. Serpentine belts when it starts to show fraying or cracks.

I can do all of these maintenance actions for about $3000 being frugal about what I buy and how the labor is completed. I have a 2006 V6 and 2012 GT and these are exactly the same items I have replaced on both cars when they hit 100,000 miles. The V6 is 125,000 and the GT is 114,000.

In all honesty, if you have had 10 instances of costly repairs I would start questioning the need for the repairs. If the car is really that bad I would consider a private sale because trade-in value will not be anything to celebrate.

stang2010 04-19-2019 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kenv (Post 9230559)
With the proper maintenance your car should be able to go 2-300,000 + miles. What you have described are "wear" items & they are going to wear out & need replacing on any vehicle. Some sooner than later. Good luck.

Thanks. Others have told me 200,000 is no problem. My real concern is the constant little pieces that are fragile and expensive.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Travis98146 (Post 9230563)
From the ownership and mileage there seems to be a serious issue. Your stock original suspension should last at least 80,000 miles, unless: bad roads, curb-jumping, off-roading, course racing, modifications or driving techniques (super hard cornering). Even if you happen to have a factory "lemon", suspension repairs should last 80K, if they're done right.

The car has been in the family since we bought it; it became mine seven years ago, so there wasn't any issue with the original owner treating it badly. But almost every year there's a new rattle and parts of the suspension are replaced bit by bit (tie rods, bearings, control arms, struts etc.). I do live in an area with some poorly maintained roads but they're in residential areas going 30-40 mph. It was built June 2009 so I wonder if it's a first model year issue.

Quote:

Originally Posted by ONEZ ST (Post 9230565)
There is no set rule except "Eriks Law" (me) places a limit on repairs at 25% of purchase price. So a $30,000 auto gets $7500 in repairs and then I make a personal decision to keep it or get rid of it.

I do not count tires or oil servicing or insurance claims.

I replace front suspension parts at 100,000 miles. Struts, strut bushings, Strut Boots, tie rods, and alignment. Ball joints and control arms only if worn. Just my pet peeve because that is the mileage my nerves are shot from the rattles of worn parts that are typically the struts or strut bearings. I buy parts at Rock Auto and pay labor for installation including an alignment.

Front brakes and new rotors also at 100,000. I've never had a set wear out. Rear brakes seem to last forever. Same source for parts -- -- Rock Auto.

Battery and Alternators are driven to failure and you will probably go through a battery or two. Serpentine belts when it starts to show fraying or cracks.

I can do all of these maintenance actions for about $3000.

In all honesty, if you have had 10 instances of costly repairs I would start questioning the need for the repairs. If the car really is that bad I would consider a private sale because trade-in value will not be anything to celebrate.

That's a fair rule. I've replaced just about everything you named. I'll have to go back and look at the invoices but I wouldn't be surprised if we've spent close to $10,000 on all of them. I love cars and know more than the average person but I am not mechanically inclined and neither is anyone in my family, so we've been paying through the nose at dealers and independent shops.

ONEZ ST 04-19-2019 12:43 AM

Labor costs are a killer. That's why I try to package the scope of work.

JBert 04-19-2019 08:29 AM

Those suspension repairs and costs seem way out of line with what would be normally expected. Yes the bushings do eventually wear out, but should be good for about 100,000 miles. Without a lot more details it is impossible to guess what is going on; but unfortunately it sounds like you need to find a more trustworthy shop to work with. Maybe they have been replacing each bushing one at a time, instead of replacing the entire set all at once. This would drive the cost way up because you basically have to do the whole job every time for each bushing, over and over, instead of doing it once for all of them.

It sounds like it should be good for a while but it's impossible to say without knowing the complete service history.

MasterX 04-19-2019 06:56 PM

A 2010 is not a first year model, most of your car is a 05-09 design, with some things such as the body shape, some electronics, etc, from the newer side which continued into 2011 and beyond, 2010 was a sort of crossover, the 2011 was the actual first year of a model....

Your engine, drivetrain, etc is pretty much 05-09 parts, with some exceptions...

MustangLife 04-19-2019 09:52 PM

You going to the same shop for the related repairs? If so time for a second opinion as you should have issues like that over and over unless you take it off roading. haha

Travis98146 04-19-2019 10:33 PM

If you trade it for Bullitt1939's no-start 2003 Saleen, you'll both come out ahead. You'll have a suspension that won't break (because it won't run) and Dana will have Mustang that will run. Sorry, I know you're both getting bit in the behind with your car problems and I seriously hope you both can find the problem and get it fixed.

stang2010 04-20-2019 12:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JBert (Post 9230595)
Those suspension repairs and costs seem way out of line with what would be normally expected. Yes the bushings do eventually wear out, but should be good for about 100,000 miles. Without a lot more details it is impossible to guess what is going on; but unfortunately it sounds like you need to find a more trustworthy shop to work with. Maybe they have been replacing each bushing one at a time, instead of replacing the entire set all at once. This would drive the cost way up because you basically have to do the whole job every time for each bushing, over and over, instead of doing it once for all of them.

It sounds like it should be good for a while but it's impossible to say without knowing the complete service history.

Everything has been replaced piecemeal, for the most part, every time I've heard a rattle. I've used multiple shops. As I mentioned above, I do live in an area with some rough roads in 30-40 mph zones.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MasterX (Post 9230653)
A 2010 is not a first year model, most of your car is a 05-09 design, with some things such as the body shape, some electronics, etc, from the newer side which continued into 2011 and beyond, 2010 was a sort of crossover, the 2011 was the actual first year of a model....

Your engine, drivetrain, etc is pretty much 05-09 parts, with some exceptions...

The engine and drivetrain and all that have been reliable. It's (mostly) the suspension that's been killing me.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MustangLife (Post 9230667)
You going to the same shop for the related repairs? If so time for a second opinion as you should have issues like that over and over unless you take it off roading. haha

No, the suspension work has been done at three different shops (two Ford dealers and an independent shop). Each one of them has found something.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Travis98146 (Post 9230671)
If you trade it for Bullitt1939's no-start 2003 Saleen, you'll both come out ahead. You'll have a suspension that won't break (because it won't run) and Dana will have Mustang that will run. Sorry, I know you're both getting bit in the behind with your car problems and I seriously hope you both can find the problem and get it fixed.

Thanks. Part of the reason I'm trying to hold on is because this will probably be my last Mustang for awhile. My next daily driver will need to be a sedan or SUV, so I'm trying to delay the inevitable.

Bullitt95 04-20-2019 03:54 AM

78 Attachment(s)
The problem with replacing suspension components piecemeal is that you drive up the labor costs.
For example, let's say your front struts need replacing. You do those and a few months later, you hear a clunk when you go over speed bumps 'cause the strut mounts are worn. So off come the struts again to replace the mounts, and then you'll need to redo the wheel alignment. If you replace struts and mounts at the same time (you can also do the jounce stops so that kills three birds with one stone) you'll only pay for labor once and do one wheel alignment. With labor costing ~$100/hour, that's quite a cost saving.
Stealerships will sometimes charge you 3 hours' labor for 2 hours' work so find a garage you can trust, get on friendly terms with the shop foreman, and they'd be more likely to look after you.

MustangLife 04-20-2019 12:27 PM

Couple things replacing parts as you have cause new parts to wear faster since they are working along with worn parts so they have to work harder. Also you aren't driving a new car so don't let a few noises bother you. Trust me the older I get the more noises I make. haha Some noises with age are normal. If you are replacing parts every time you hear a noise you will go brankrupt. If you want a perfect no noise car you need to buy/sell cars every 4-5 years. That will cost you as well, but at least you know there aren't any other major issues as you have a warranty.

Bullitt95 04-21-2019 02:34 AM

You might as well keep your 2010 until the wheels fall off 'cause you'd get peanuts for a trade-in. This was a crossover year for both the V6 and the GT. With the older engine in the newer body style, many consider it one of the red-headed stepchildren in the Mustang family like the '94-'98 V6 and the '96-'98 GT.

MasterX 04-22-2019 01:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bullitt95 (Post 9230819)
You might as well keep your 2010 until the wheels fall off 'cause you'd get peanuts for a trade-in. This was a crossover year for both the V6 and the GT. With the older engine in the newer body style, many consider it one of the red-headed stepchildren in the Mustang family like the '94-'98 V6 and the '96-'98 GT.

Indeed, however we 05-09 owners have the 2010 step child to thank for the newer design alternator that works backwards to our models, i was just researching that yesterday, lots of people saying to get a 2010 alt, and swap over to it, boosts reliability and solves some other issues, even has better clearance for some supercharger builds in which the original alt got in the way a little. the 2010 elec connector sits a bit lower and different angle.


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