Will the Boss 302 Oil Cooler increase engine oil pressures? - Ford Mustang Forum
 
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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-09-2012 Thread Starter
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Will the Boss 302 Oil Cooler increase engine oil pressures?

I was wondering if the Boss 302 oil cooler increase engine oil pressures. And if it would increase oil pressures, what effect would that have on a supercharged 2012 Mustang GT.

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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-09-2012
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As far as that aspect, I would think that it would lower the oil pressure because of more space/lines that it has to now go through.
Nothing significant though where it would be unsafe for a s/c

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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-09-2012
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From a physics viewpoint, if you restrict flow you increase pressure. So the question becomes, does the Boss oil cooler restrict flow and increase pressure? I doubt it.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-10-2012
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Think of it this way - the reason you put an oil cooler on an engine in the first place is to increase the oil pressure at sustained high loads.

Once the oil temp is over the coolant temp, the cooler will reduce the oil temperature which increases the viscosity which in turn increases oil pressure.

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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-10-2012
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^ wouldn't the point of a cooler be to cool oil, not increase pressure? The cooler oil will have a thicker viscosity and more psi which will be from being harder to pump due to increased viscosity. Also from a purely mechanical aspect anything in the line will increase psi.

I agree with a couple of posts above the difference in psi will be mostly theoretical. A guess would be a few psi but that's only a guess. Also higher psi=higher hp needed to run oil pump again mostly insignificant but nonetheless real.

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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-10-2012
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Given that oil pumps usually have a relief valve built into the system I doubt you'll see any change at all.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-10-2012
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You'd never be able to measure it. Not sure you could measure the flow area in a cooler that would cause a restriction, oil shouldn't get much above coolent temp and what if any viscosity difference is there between 220 degs and 190. Probably having a dirty oil filter is worth worring about more than this
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-10-2012
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The boss oil cooler will only help your engine it will not change oil pressure at all only cool the oil and if you have a supercharger you sure as hell could use an oil cooler.
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 11-11-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Strange Mud View Post
^ wouldn't the point of a cooler be to cool oil, not increase pressure? The cooler oil will have a thicker viscosity and more psi which will be from being harder to pump due to increased viscosity.
Yes. The point of the cooler is to keep the oil from getting so hot that the oil pump can't maintain adequate oil pressure to keep the oil flowing into the crank and cam bearings. The biggest risk of this kind of pressure loss is actually when a smokin' hot engine drops to idle RPM.

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The engine oil pump / pressure regulator provides a fixed pressure at operating RPM, around 40 psi.

There will be a pressure drop for each component in the loop from the pump to the sump, for things like the tubing, the cooler and the engine.

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Boss oil cooler on a supercharged GT

I am posting this as it seems apparent to me that the responders so far don't know much about the Boss oil cooler setup.
The Boss oil cooler is a COOLANT based oil cooler that relies on coolant flow around a heat sink that the oil filter attaches to. In other words there is no additional oil added to the system/engine as this is Not a traditional oil cooler. If you research the Ford racing site there is a >$1,000 true oil cooler that is sold that has hard lines that attach to a traditional air cooled oil cooler that is recommended for track use.

The other responders have covered the traditional oil cooler impacts. Hope this helps, but please note using the radiator to attempt to cool the oil is a factory cheap step when they should have used a traditional oil cooler on the Boss cars. Your supercharged car needs MAX oil cooling not a $200 heat sink if you plan on tracking it.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdawg View Post
I am posting this as it seems apparent to me that the responders so far don't know much about the Boss oil cooler setup.
The Boss oil cooler is a COOLANT based oil cooler that relies on coolant flow around a heat sink that the oil filter attaches to. In other words there is no additional oil added to the system/engine as this is Not a traditional oil cooler. If you research the Ford racing site there is a >$1,000 true oil cooler that is sold that has hard lines that attach to a traditional air cooled oil cooler that is recommended for track use.

The other responders have covered the traditional oil cooler impacts. Hope this helps, but please note using the radiator to attempt to cool the oil is a factory cheap step when they should have used a traditional oil cooler on the Boss cars. Your supercharged car needs MAX oil cooling not a $200 heat sink if you plan on tracking it.
this all makes since...but why would a supercharged car need a true oil cooler? i know a cetnri does not use the engine oil and im pretty sure a p/d blower doesnt either...

now a turbo an oil cooler makes sense..

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Oil Coolers

Correct that the S197 fitted Superchargers don't tap into internal oil like older forced induction systems did as they are now "self lubricated" via there own reserviors. The purpose of oil coolers is pure heat/thermal management for track days as even in extended daily driving with traffic the PD and Centris would not seem to need oil coolers. Unless your seeing over 240 degrees of oil temp with the reading starting to escalate then your not going to benefit from a traditional oil cooler. My '08 BMW 535i doesn't even open its factory oil cooler thermostat until after 240 degrees. It rapidly escalates to 270-280 degrees (known BMW issue where limp mode goes into effect at 300 degrees). Get out of boost (14 psi stage 1 Cobb) and it returns to 240 degrees quickly with the oil cooler fully working in cool air.

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Both coolant and air styles oil coolers have pros and cons. Street car work great with coolant style oil coolers. Air cooled oil cooler work better for full time track car.
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Dawg,

I was discussing science, If I wanted to talk about facts I would've.

one of the best 1st posts btw.......welcome to AFM!


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