Considering brake fluid flush - Page 2 - Ford Mustang Forum
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I just helped to bleed my son's Acura TL with Brembos and was surprised to find out that the sequence was almost as NoVa says:
LFO
LFI
RFO
RFI
LR
RR

Not sure why that is but we followed that sequence with no issues.


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Originally Posted by dusman59 View Post
The factory service manual calls for this sequence. With the conventional brake system it says to bleed like its been done for years.

RR
LR
RF
LF

I know sometimes there is a better way to things but Ford took the time to come up with this.
Make sure that you're reading Ford's procedure for the Brembo brakes, otherwise described as GT500 brakes or brakes for cars equipped with the 5.4L engine.


The 4-piston Brembo front calipers are entirely different from the 2-piston calipers used on "lesser" models/trims.


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post #18 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-04-2016 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Norm Peterson View Post
Make sure that you're reading Ford's procedure for the Brembo brakes, otherwise described as GT500 brakes or brakes for cars equipped with the 5.4L engine.


The 4-piston Brembo front calipers are entirely different from the 2-piston calipers used on "lesser" models/trims.


Norm
Thanks Norm. I double checked after you brought this to my attention and the manual says vehicles with 4 piston calibers.


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post #19 of 24 (permalink) Old 06-04-2016 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBert View Post
And back to the OP -- what makes you think you have to worry about boiling the fluid? That pretty much never happens under normal street driving conditions. You have to try pretty hard on a track to get things hot enough to boil the fluid -- meaning multiple repeated hard stops from high speed (like 100+). Even Arizona heat during street driving is nowhere near close to this.
I don't track my car but I do drive in the mountain and canyon areas where the speed limit is 75mph. Today its going to be 114f and tomorrow 115f. The temps on the roadways run even hotter. Our expressways do come to abrupt stop with lots of stop and go. I agree with your input normal street driving but with older fluid I think its a precaution to have fresh high end fluid.


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I assure everyone, the normal idea of bleeding the brake furthest from the master-cylinder doesn't work with the Brembo brakes.


Believe me, I learned the hard way.

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Originally Posted by 5.0 Coyote View Post
I would go to your auto parts store and get a dip test kit,that will tell you the condition of your brake fluid.I have an early build 2011 GT with 19,000 miles on it,I just tested mine before I had the cooling system totally flushed by Ford,and my BRAKE FLUID was perfect,I was a mechanic for 35+ years,some things need to be done by the book, and some are way to unnecessary. Just my $02.
Just reposting this as the dip test kit for brake fluid should be testing for water concentration which I believe he was trying to imply. In brake fluid it should not be over 4%. And contrary to what has been stated in other posts, the reason isn't to prevent "boiling" your brake fluid which will almost never happen on the street. The water absorbed into the brake fluid will cause corrosion / rust from the inside out which will cause component failure and leakage. This is why many manufacturers are stating 2 year intervals as mileage doesn't affect this. But where you live (humidity index) does, and the dip test will show if its needed or not. When I lived in SoCal I flushed my brakes almost annually as I lived near the beach. Now living in ID I haven't done it in 4 years.
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Originally Posted by NoVa5.0 View Post
Believe me, I learned the hard way.
What happened? What did you learn?

It's always worked just fine for me.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by candersen View Post
Just reposting this as the dip test kit for brake fluid should be testing for water concentration which I believe he was trying to imply. In brake fluid it should not be over 4%. And contrary to what has been stated in other posts, the reason isn't to prevent "boiling" your brake fluid which will almost never happen on the street. The water absorbed into the brake fluid will cause corrosion / rust from the inside out which will cause component failure and leakage. This is why many manufacturers are stating 2 year intervals as mileage doesn't affect this. But where you live (humidity index) does, and the dip test will show if its needed or not. When I lived in SoCal I flushed my brakes almost annually as I lived near the beach. Now living in ID I haven't done it in 4 years.
Those of us who track our cars are going to think of fluid boiling before system decay from internal corrosion. Just saying . . .



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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoVa5.0 View Post
I assure everyone, the normal idea of bleeding the brake furthest from the master-cylinder doesn't work with the Brembo brakes.

Believe me, I learned the hard way.
I would like to hear more about this also.

I know I am going against the "conventional wisdom" but it makes more sense to me to work the old fluid away from the reservoir -- so that would mean closest first; and do the inside first; which is the sequence posted earlier in this thread.

Quote:
Originally Posted by candersen View Post
. . . the reason isn't to prevent "boiling" your brake fluid which will almost never happen on the street. The water absorbed into the brake fluid will cause corrosion / rust from the inside out which will cause component failure and leakage. This is why many manufacturers are stating 2 year intervals as mileage doesn't affect this. . . . .
That sounds like another reason to use the normal DOT3 fluid, unless you have a strong reason to use the DOT4

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