Sandbags for winter? - Ford Mustang Forum
Like Tree10Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-13-2019 Thread Starter
Rookie
 
Mycelus's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2016
Posts: 32
 
Sandbags for winter?

Getting a 13-14 GT and wondering if anyone utilizes sandbags for the winter. I know they help for certain cars but not sure if it's a good idea for RWD cars.

Hoping to get some feedback. I'm in Minnesota FYI, so snow/ice = plenty :P

Mycelus is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019
BOSS Member
 
Beechkid's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,346
           
Having lived in the mountains, yes, the more weight on the drive wheels the better...but, also be aware that the gas tanks sit in the trunk area of the car and although a little bit of weight is good, a whole lot (like several hundred pounds) could cause issues with the trunk floor.


:hello:
Member: Never trust a person over 40 who drives a Chevy club
Flatheads ain't so bad!
Certified backyard mechanic I & II
Beechkid is offline  
post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019 Thread Starter
Rookie
 
Mycelus's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2016
Posts: 32
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beechkid View Post
Having lived in the mountains, yes, the more weight on the drive wheels the better...but, also be aware that the gas tanks sit in the trunk area of the car and although a little bit of weight is good, a whole lot (like several hundred pounds) could cause issues with the trunk floor.
I was thinking 150 lbs
Beechkid likes this.
Mycelus is offline  
 
post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019
SHELBY GT 350 Member
4.6L Member
S197 Member
 
JBert's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Central Massachusetts
Posts: 9,025
           
I have driven rear wheel drive cars in winter in New England for a long time, and never bothered adding weight in the trunk, beyond a full tank of gas.

The extra weight might help the rear wheels bite in a bit more, but it is partially self-defeating -- the more weight in the car, the harder it is to get it moving and the harder it is to stop it. Also the more weight in the rear, the harder it is to stop the rear from sliding out once it starts.

I think you are better off with good snow tires. And I think I neglected to mention in your other thread, you do NOT want wide snow tires; you want them to be as narrow as practical. So if you buy winter wheels, buy narrow wheels, like 7.5" or 8" width; and put 235 or narrower tires on them. I am not sure what brakes you have on your car, if you have the brembos I'm pretty sure you will need at least 9" wide wheels; but for the "normal" brakes a 7.5" x 17" wheel will clear (unless the design of the wheel is all wrong)
Norm Peterson likes this.

| 2010 GT coupe | Daily Driver with some Steeda and GT500 take-off stuff for the occasional track day
JBert is online now  
post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019 Thread Starter
Rookie
 
Mycelus's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2016
Posts: 32
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBert View Post
I have driven rear wheel drive cars in winter in New England for a long time, and never bothered adding weight in the trunk, beyond a full tank of gas.

The extra weight might help the rear wheels bite in a bit more, but it is partially self-defeating -- the more weight in the car, the harder it is to get it moving and the harder it is to stop it. Also the more weight in the rear, the harder it is to stop the rear from sliding out once it starts.

I think you are better off with good snow tires. And I think I neglected to mention in your other thread, you do NOT want wide snow tires; you want them to be as narrow as practical. So if you buy winter wheels, buy narrow wheels, like 7.5" or 8" width; and put 235 or narrower tires on them. I am not sure what brakes you have on your car, if you have the brembos I'm pretty sure you will need at least 9" wide wheels; but for the "normal" brakes a 7.5" x 17" wheel will clear (unless the design of the wheel is all wrong)
Good to get that input from another owner. I figured sandbags were not necessary but I know they tend to be more helpful for certain vehicles. As long as I can control the car safely, and get good traction, I should be all set. Hoping to get a set of WS-80's asap and I'll see just how good they are for myself :P
Mycelus is offline  
post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019
GLOBAL MODERATOR
S197 Member
 
5.0 Coyote's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2010
Location: San Carlos Park
Posts: 2,336
               
Hear is my take,as I lived in Minnesota (Twin cities ) for 55 years,I retired and LEFT for S/W Florida in 2001,I have owned many sports cars in that time, from Corvettes to Mustangs.Here is my advice to you,buy a beater and store your Mustang,your car like any other sports car sits VERY low to the ground,you know what a foot of snow will do,if your Mustang is bottomed out the tires can't get any traction,then there is that salt and sand thing,also the drivers with to much GO and not enough WOH,bang totaled or Carfax report.My advice is store the Mustang for the winter and buy a beater.Best of luck,hope you have a mild winter.
5.0 Coyote
JBert, Beechkid and crjackson2134 like this.
5.0 Coyote is offline  
post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019
SHELBY GT 350 Member
4.6L Member
S197 Member
 
JBert's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2011
Location: Central Massachusetts
Posts: 9,025
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5.0 Coyote View Post
. . . your Mustang ... like any other sports car sits VERY low to the ground,you know what a foot of snow will do,if your Mustang is bottomed out the tires can't get any traction . . . .
yeah there is that -- the stang really is only good for a few inches of snow, or plowed roads . . . you can gain a little bit of ground clearance by using taller tires but it is still quite limited by ground clearance . . . I did drive my stang through several Massachusetts winters, but I also had my wife's SUV for when the snow got deep
5.0 Coyote and marylandGT like this.

| 2010 GT coupe | Daily Driver with some Steeda and GT500 take-off stuff for the occasional track day
JBert is online now  
post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019 Thread Starter
Rookie
 
Mycelus's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2016
Posts: 32
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JBert View Post
yeah there is that -- the stang really is only good for a few inches of snow, or plowed roads . . . you can gain a little bit of ground clearance by using taller tires but it is still quite limited by ground clearance . . . I did drive my stang through several Massachusetts winters, but I also had my wife's SUV for when the snow got deep
My ****** 01 Civic made it around just fine on all seasons during the terrible 2018 winter :P I think Mustang with new Blizzak's will do okay.

Side note, would cat litter be a better idea for adding some weight and also having something for traction? I use World's Best Cat Litter brand which is corn based litter and I have a feeling it'd be great for getting out of sticky situations.
Mycelus is offline  
post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019
MACH I Member
 
pikapp's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2006
Posts: 2,675
 
Garage
This would solve your Winter Issues...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	MUSTANG READY FOR WINTER.jpg
Views:	22
Size:	133.0 KB
ID:	611843  

IF MY CAR WENT AS FAST AS THE MONEY I SPEND ON IT, I'D WIN EVERY RACE
pikapp is offline  
post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 10-14-2019 Thread Starter
Rookie
 
Mycelus's Avatar
 
Joined: Nov 2016
Posts: 32
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikapp View Post
This would solve your Winter Issues...
Don't tempt me...
Mycelus is offline  
BOSS Member
 
Beechkid's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2013
Location: SoCal
Posts: 4,346
           
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mycelus View Post
My ****** 01 Civic made it around just fine on all seasons during the terrible 2018 winter :P I think Mustang with new Blizzak's will do okay..
2 completely different cars- The Honda 1st gear is gutless.....25 mph max and with the transaxle sitting on top of the drive wheels...it's going to do pretty good in the snow and with studded snow tires...it will do pretty good on the ice as well. The mustang...Ö twice the torque on the rear wheels with much less weight...Ö. and even in oem trim, wider tires..... all working against you. With the 150lbs of extra weight in the trunk, this will help give more stability, reduced tire pressure will help as well, and you will get (learn) throttle techniques that will help you also..... and of course being RWD it works the opposite of FWD...meaning with FWD if you get into trouble (sliding) you gentle step on the gas to pull you out....if you use too much engine compression to slow down, the rear end comes around...Ö in fresh snow, not over 6-8 inches, you will have no issues.

:hello:
Member: Never trust a person over 40 who drives a Chevy club
Flatheads ain't so bad!
Certified backyard mechanic I & II
Beechkid is offline  
GT Member
V6 Member
S197 Member
 
Siber Express's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2010
Location: East
Posts: 2,379
 
If you feel the need for Sandbags Quikrete make 60 pound bags you can get at Lowes. Placing them as far back in the trunk is better than over the axle since it will transfer some weight from the front that way.
Come to think of it the only vehicle I ever had to put sandbags in was my 4X4 87 Dodge Dakota, that was for the crappy ride after I cranked the torsion bars to level it.

http://i124.photobucket.com/albums/p34/Siberexpress/Sterling/Stripes/af58edf0-2e2e-4ffe-a201-405b00a627bc_zpseb5ae052.jpg
2013 Performance Package V6
2013 F150 6.2L Boss
Yes it is a Boss
Siber Express is offline  
Rookie
 
neboss's Avatar
 
Joined: Jan 2019
Location: Grand Island
Posts: 6
 
Don't worry about the gas tanks being used as the trunk floor. The gas tanks in the modern cars are located forward of the rear axle. Early Mustangs [like my '69] use the tank as the trunk floor.
5.0 Coyote likes this.
neboss is offline  
post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 4 Weeks Ago
Rookie
 
Fergus Mustang's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2013
Location: Fergus Falls
Posts: 2
 
People have forgotten that that RWD is all we used to drive in Minnesota. Sand bags are a good idea. Try to get the tubes of sand as they will lay will drape over the over the top of the rear wheel housing in the truck. If those are not available get an old truck tire inner tube and cut it in half. Use a heavy wire to twist around one end to seal it. Buy some bags of play sand at the fleet farm store and fill them up then tie the other end off tightly. These will give you heavy duty flexible weight to lay over the wheel well in the trunk. In 1977 I bought a used 1966 mustang years when my wife and I needed a second car cheap. I drove all over the state for several winters and did not give it a thought. It was really a fun car in the snow.
Fergus Mustang is offline  
post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 4 Weeks Ago
MACH I Member
4.6L Member
S197 Member
 
marylandGT's Avatar
 
Joined: Mar 2011
Location: Pasadena
Posts: 2,836
             
Garage
IMO. When I drove in NE Pa. in the late 70s, early 80s, in my Dads 350 72 Nova, torque and horsepower were nothing compared to today's cars.
I learned what a car can and can't do, and respected it!!
The car was a standard 3 speed. I could drive that through some snow storms because I knew when to drive it and when not to. I was aware what the car could do and what it could not do.
Point is, these modern cars are not built for severe, adverse conditions.
Use some common sense and keep your car out of the ditch.

huberoy123 likes this.

08 GT 5spd
Spectra CAI, Comp Cam Detroit Rockers, Kooks headers w/catted H-pipe, Revolution Automotive dyno tuned, FB430 race mufflers, 3.55s, JLT catch can, BMR Lca's and relo brackets. Prothane motor mounts and sway bar bushings.
20% tint, smoked markers and tail lights w/sequentials. Clear front signal covers, series 3 chin spoiler.
marylandGT is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Ford Mustang Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a VALID email address for yourself, otherwise you will not receive the necessary confirmation email needed to confirm, validate and activate your new AFM member account.

Failure to provide a VALID email address, will result in the cancellation of your new AFM member account registration.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 


Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1