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post #1 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016 Thread Starter
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Faster acceleration

I'm getting bored of my 0-60. It's a stock GT with the track pack. I'll probably get a tuner soon, though I don't really want to void my warranty. I was watching an American muscle video and they just installed 4.10 gears and rear control arms and were able to get a faster 60 time. Is that practical? The control arms aren't super expensive and they seem like an easy mod. There's obviously intakes and exhaust upgrades if I want to start spending a bunch of money. Does a larger throttle body by itself help out with power? It has the stock CAI that I have been told is good enough but there's a bunch of aftermarket ones too...

Thanks
SG


1967 Sport Sprint 200, 3 speed standard, Midnight Blue, June 7. No A/C, manual steering and drum brakes. Added dual exhaust and front disc brakes.
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post #2 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016
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Hi, we can help you out big time in this category. Stick with the basics...meaning a custom tune and a JLT Cold Air Intake (which we offer). This will wake the car right up! It is a night and day difference and this is money well spent. Lower Control Arms are inexpensive and really help get traction due to the polyurethane bushings and stronger materials so they are a very good investment, we recommend the BMR TCA019 ($139.95 shipped). I would hold off on the gears until you see what a difference the custom calibration makes. Honestly you will be hooked after these few modifications. Check us out at Mustang Performance Parts & Upgrades by Brenspeed

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post #3 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016
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Faster acceleration

4:10 is not a good idea IMO. Too deep of a gear to be practical on a street car with MT82. Work on traction improvements first or power adders are going to make your 0-60 worse.


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post #4 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016
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Originally Posted by myblue67 View Post
I'm getting bored of my 0-60. It's a stock GT with the track pack. I'll probably get a tuner soon, though I don't really want to void my warranty.

I was watching an American muscle video and they just installed 4.10 gears and rear control arms and were able to get a faster 60 time. Is that practical?

The control arms aren't super expensive and they seem like an easy mod. There's obviously intakes and exhaust upgrades if I want to start spending a bunch of money.

Does a larger throttle body by itself help out with power? It has the stock CAI that I have been told is good enough but there's a bunch of aftermarket ones too...

Thanks
SG
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Originally Posted by stevegt2012 View Post
4:10 is not a good idea IMO. Too deep of a gear to be practical on a street car with MT82. Work on traction improvements first or power adders are going to make your 0-60 worse.

Hey Blue - I'll piggyback on what Steve had said here in regards to the 4.10's and if your commute is long they're going to chew up your fuel consumption. Depending on how long it is I might suggest a 3.73 setup.

Making that jump along with a custom tune and pairing it with an intake would help but you'll see it up and down this forum that the intake on the car is a cold air and is more than enough. Being said if you we're to search YouTube for a "before and after" cold air coyote dyno you'll see people on a private dyno not a manufactures or a company make power; They work.

I don't think the throttle bodies are too efficient unless you're going to be getting into long tube headers etc. Being said Gears and a pair of Lower Control arms will do wonders for the Coyote and here's my suggestions below:

J&M Control Arms and Ford Racing 3.73's ;





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post #5 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016
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TIRE! Grab some nice tires and a good set of LCA's and brackets.

Lots of parts. Still slow
post #6 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016 Thread Starter
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Thanks all! Yah I asked about the stock intake because I heard the same thing from others but I definitely like the look of aftermarket ones better. It already has 3.73 because of the track pack so I'm good there. American muscle recommend these

http://www.americanmuscle.com/bbk-lca-0513.html

What's the difference between those and the J&M? I forgot to mention the tires aren't stock. The rears are 285/35R19 so a there wider and the fronts are 255/40R19 which actually might be stock. There getting pretty worn becuase I light them up to often . What will I be looking to spend on new ones? I'm trying to go to a drag on tomorrow so I should probably invest in new ones before that...

Thanks

1967 Sport Sprint 200, 3 speed standard, Midnight Blue, June 7. No A/C, manual steering and drum brakes. Added dual exhaust and front disc brakes.
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post #7 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016 Thread Starter
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It also gets a little terrifying on the canyons. Not sure if it's because mustangs are only suppose to go in straight lines haha. Or if I can do something to the suspension. It obviously doesn't have IRS so I'm a little limited right?

1967 Sport Sprint 200, 3 speed standard, Midnight Blue, June 7. No A/C, manual steering and drum brakes. Added dual exhaust and front disc brakes.
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post #8 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016
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I have no issue hanging with BRZ / S2000 / Miatas around the twisties out here on long island. I do feel the solid rear holding me back from coming onto power earlier in the exits and having to brake a little harder on the entries due to the car wanting to oversteer with the slightest bit of throttle. Whichever brand LCA Relocation you get just make sure its a bolt on style relocation. Steeda's require welding and has a higher margin for error in the geometry , I like the whiteline relocation its cheap and is surprisingly very very well made.

Lots of parts. Still slow
post #9 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-06-2016 Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by [email protected] View Post
I have no issue hanging with BRZ / S2000 / Miatas around the twisties out here on long island. I do feel the solid rear holding me back from coming onto power earlier in the exits and having to brake a little harder on the entries due to the car wanting to oversteer with the slightest bit of throttle. Whichever brand LCA Relocation you get just make sure its a bolt on style relocation. Steeda's require welding and has a higher margin for error in the geometry , I like the whiteline relocation its cheap and is surprisingly very very well made.
As far as I can see the difference between the BBK and the J&M is that the BBK is greasable so that's probably the better option. And they look to be a direct install. I spent today looking at tires and there super expensive because of the rears. And the fact that I can't rotate them sucks. I'm thinking of getting the same size for the rears as the fronts, is that alright?

1967 Sport Sprint 200, 3 speed standard, Midnight Blue, June 7. No A/C, manual steering and drum brakes. Added dual exhaust and front disc brakes.
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[QUOTE=. I'm thinking of getting the same size for the rears as the fronts, is that alright?[/QUOTE]



If it's a track pack car it came with 255/40R19 all around, so no worries!

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post #11 of 46 (permalink) Old 01-07-2016 Thread Starter
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If it's a track pack car it came with 255/40R19 all around, so no worries!
Yah so I think my best bet on wheels will be to get 255/40 rear rims and then all new tires. Anyone on here want my old ones??

1967 Sport Sprint 200, 3 speed standard, Midnight Blue, June 7. No A/C, manual steering and drum brakes. Added dual exhaust and front disc brakes.
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Thanks all! Yah I asked about the stock intake because I heard the same thing from others but I definitely like the look of aftermarket ones better. It already has 3.73 because of the track pack so I'm good there. American muscle recommend these

BBK Mustang Rear Lower Control Arms 25215 (05-14 All) - Free Shipping

What's the difference between those and the J&M? I forgot to mention the tires aren't stock. The rears are 285/35R19 so a there wider and the fronts are 255/40R19 which actually might be stock. There getting pretty worn becuase I light them up to often . What will I be looking to spend on new ones? I'm trying to go to a drag on tomorrow so I should probably invest in new ones before that...

Thanks
The difference is the bushing design. We supply a water proof grease that is designed for our bushings so there isn't a need for grease fittings.

The control arm bushings found in the Mustang automobiles can have a significant impact on the vehicle’s ride, comfort, handling, acceleration, noise and vibration. When the car leans (i.e., rolls) in a turn, one side of the chassis moves upward relative to the rear axle, the other side moves downward, and the control arms must twist to allow for the axle to articulate. This causes the control arm bushings to bind. If this bind becomes excessive, it will raise the rear wheel rate and produce sudden, uncontrolled, undesirable changes in handling (e.g., snap oversteer).

Ford minimizes this suspension bind by using compliant rubber bushings in both lower control arms. These relatively “soft” bushings help accommodate the necessary motion of the control arms during body roll. However, the rubber bushings do not provide much in the way of forward and aft support, which can cause wheel hop during hard acceleration and braking.

It has become common practice to replace the stock rubber control arm bushings with solid or two piece polyurethane bushings to resolve the shortcomings of the soft rubber bushings. Hard polyurethane bushings eliminate wheel hop, reduce axle deflection, and improve rear straight line grip. However, the downside of common aftermarket bushings such as delrin, steel, stiffer rubber, solid or two piece polyurethane bushings is they prevent the necessary movement of the control arms during body roll, which in turn produces significant binding in the suspension when the vehicle is cornering. The polyurethane bushings also place unnecessary high stresses on the torque boxes, which are the attachment points for the control arms to the chassis. Standard aftermarket control arms do not allow for rotation of the control arm during cornering because of the stiffness of the bushings.

The Solution:

We at J&M Products designed and built a tubular lower control arm which will eliminate the unwanted uncontrolled control arm flex. Round tubing is harder to work with but has many other advantages over square or rectangular tubing. It is stronger in bending, torsion, and also lighter than square or rectangular tubing.

We then solved the shortcomings of the factory rubber and other aftermarket polyurethane and stiffer rubber bushings. This was accomplished with our Patent Pending 3 piece Poly-Ball bushing combination. By spending countless hours looking and dissecting the geometry and the need of the rear suspension we come out with bind-free bushings set up. Our Patent Pending Poly-Ball bushing combination incorporates a very hard inner polyurethane ball which is surrounded by soft socket outer cups. This combination allows the bushing to articulate like a spherical bearing during cornering but the hard inner ball does not allow the bushing to deflect during acceleration giving you great traction during acceleration like solid bushings but remains completely bind free like a spherical bearing during cornering for great predictable traction in the corners.

The Testing:

We built a fixture which simulated a factory control arm mounting and tested how much force was needed to make the control arm articulate (twist) in those mounts and the results where astounding.

Poly-Ball Bushings:
5 degrees of total rotation = 26.1 foot/pounds of torque

7.5 degrees of total rotation = 35.8 foot/pounds of torque

10 degrees of total rotation = 41.7 foot/pounds of torque

Standard 2 piece setup using only 85 durometer bushings:

5 degrees of total rotation = 124.7 foot/pounds of torque

7.5 degrees of total rotation = 156.4 foot/pounds of torque

10 degrees of total rotation = not measurable with fixture. The 1/2″ grade 8 bolt twisted in half at 9.2 degrees which was 210 foot/pounds of torque.
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^^ Big thumbs up for the info. Good read

Lots of parts. Still slow
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HotPart View Post
The difference is the bushing design. We supply a water proof grease that is designed for our bushings so there isn't a need for grease fittings.

The control arm bushings found in the Mustang automobiles can have a significant impact on the vehicle’s ride, comfort, handling, acceleration, noise and vibration. When the car leans (i.e., rolls) in a turn, one side of the chassis moves upward relative to the rear axle, the other side moves downward, and the control arms must twist to allow for the axle to articulate. This causes the control arm bushings to bind. If this bind becomes excessive, it will raise the rear wheel rate and produce sudden, uncontrolled, undesirable changes in handling (e.g., snap oversteer).

Ford minimizes this suspension bind by using compliant rubber bushings in both lower control arms. These relatively “soft” bushings help accommodate the necessary motion of the control arms during body roll. However, the rubber bushings do not provide much in the way of forward and aft support, which can cause wheel hop during hard acceleration and braking.

It has become common practice to replace the stock rubber control arm bushings with solid or two piece polyurethane bushings to resolve the shortcomings of the soft rubber bushings. Hard polyurethane bushings eliminate wheel hop, reduce axle deflection, and improve rear straight line grip. However, the downside of common aftermarket bushings such as delrin, steel, stiffer rubber, solid or two piece polyurethane bushings is they prevent the necessary movement of the control arms during body roll, which in turn produces significant binding in the suspension when the vehicle is cornering. The polyurethane bushings also place unnecessary high stresses on the torque boxes, which are the attachment points for the control arms to the chassis. Standard aftermarket control arms do not allow for rotation of the control arm during cornering because of the stiffness of the bushings.

The Solution:

We at J&M Products designed and built a tubular lower control arm which will eliminate the unwanted uncontrolled control arm flex. Round tubing is harder to work with but has many other advantages over square or rectangular tubing. It is stronger in bending, torsion, and also lighter than square or rectangular tubing.

We then solved the shortcomings of the factory rubber and other aftermarket polyurethane and stiffer rubber bushings. This was accomplished with our Patent Pending 3 piece Poly-Ball bushing combination. By spending countless hours looking and dissecting the geometry and the need of the rear suspension we come out with bind-free bushings set up. Our Patent Pending Poly-Ball bushing combination incorporates a very hard inner polyurethane ball which is surrounded by soft socket outer cups. This combination allows the bushing to articulate like a spherical bearing during cornering but the hard inner ball does not allow the bushing to deflect during acceleration giving you great traction during acceleration like solid bushings but remains completely bind free like a spherical bearing during cornering for great predictable traction in the corners.

The Testing:

We built a fixture which simulated a factory control arm mounting and tested how much force was needed to make the control arm articulate (twist) in those mounts and the results where astounding.

Poly-Ball Bushings:
5 degrees of total rotation = 26.1 foot/pounds of torque

7.5 degrees of total rotation = 35.8 foot/pounds of torque

10 degrees of total rotation = 41.7 foot/pounds of torque

Standard 2 piece setup using only 85 durometer bushings:

5 degrees of total rotation = 124.7 foot/pounds of torque

7.5 degrees of total rotation = 156.4 foot/pounds of torque

10 degrees of total rotation = not measurable with fixture. The 1/2″ grade 8 bolt twisted in half at 9.2 degrees which was 210 foot/pounds of torque.
Well you've pretty much sold me, and I've added both the standard and extreme models of the J&M LCAs to my build list until I can decide. So please, if you don't mind answering a couple of questions indulge me for a moment.

I have looked at both versions listed on the AM site, and I can see the BALL/SPHEAR looking component on the extreme that looks like what you were describing above. That being the case, am I to assume that the less expensive model doesn't offer the ability to articulate in such a manner so as to relieve the torsional forces applied upon body roll?

I'm guessing yes, and if that's the case, then the less expensive version is off the table for me. If that's not the case please explain if you don't mind.

Secondly, I'm going off the beaten path of others here but I'm really concerned about adding NVH over stock. It may not be worth the upgrade for me based on that factor alone, but I'm hoping these are quiet like the stock one.

My usage:
My car is a daily driver, it will never see a track. It is exceptionally different from other Mustangs I've driven and own (2x 2014 Premium GTs w/MT82). My personal DD is so smooth and quiet (while at the same time it has pretty darn nimble handling compared to a grocery getter). It shifts so smooth it's like a luxury car with a standard. It is stiff but not harsh at all. All that being said, it wheel hops like a jack hammer under moderate to heavy acceleration.

Can I cure the wheel hop without losing the pleasantness of the current setup? I realize it's hard to know this for sure, but your honest best guess will be good enough.

What do YOU recommended?


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2018 Black Nissan 370Z Nismo - (Lucille-2)
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get a good tune, CAI, and LCA's then call it a day.


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