"BBQ" and "typewriter" engine ticks - Ford Mustang Forum
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-04-2019 Thread Starter
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"BBQ" and "typewriter" engine ticks

I realize that the subject has been addressed off and on in this and other forums. I have somewhat been planning on jumping back into a Mustang this summer depending on what kind of deal I can wrangle for a new 2019 or 2020 GT. But I am getting spooked as I read the YouTube clips of the tick. The conclusions in resolving or not resolving the causes of the ticks are causing me to doubt the wisdom/sanity of objective. The last thing I want is to trade my totally trouble free '18 Crosstrek for a headache. I love the Mustangs (regret training my '14 GT) and don't want to spoil the experience. Just sayin'....



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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-04-2019
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How did your 14 GT run? They have the tick too. Majority run just fine and have no problems. There will always be some that are the exception to the rule and have total engine failure.


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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-04-2019 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Goat Ninja View Post
How did your 14 GT run? They have the tick too. Majority run just fine and have no problems. There will always be some that are the exception to the rule and have total engine failure.
It ran great! However, one of the reasons I traded was a tick. The engine was quiet up until just over 50K miles. Upon a return home from a bicycle ride in July 2017, I cranked the car at the park and heard a rather loud tick. I revved it but it still had the tick. I drove 25 miles to my house and the tick was gone by the time I arrived. The car was traded within a month of that. I don't care what the explanation is for that occurrence, but I maintain that IT SHOULD NOT HAVE HAPPENED! Just like you don't give a dead battery a 2nd chance and considering the history of 5.0 ticks, wasn't gonna have to hear that tick again. Bye bye car!


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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 03-04-2019
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I hear that, I got rid of my last car because it started doing a known problem. Literally traded it in the next morning.

Mine occasionally ticks, but I can't hear it from the drivers seat, only when engine is running and I'm outside car. I had car a year before I even heard it. Started it up and got out to check the tire pressure, and that's when I heard it for the first time.
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-18-2019 Thread Starter
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In one YouTube video, the poster's Ford dealer said that it was normal since so many have the tick hence they wouldn't authorize a warranty repair. In another video, the poster had the dealer replace the engine twice but all 3 engines developed the tick soon after taking delivery. He was able to get Ford to buy it back since teardown of all 3 engines revealed scoring in more than one cylinder each. In another video, Ford acknowledged that there was a problem on some engines with the processing of a coating on the cylinder walls which ended up causing the piston slap and scoring. So there's enough stuff out there that will cause me to wait until maybe a new Coyote update? The 5.0 seems to be causing a black mark on Ford.

Looking at the big picture and the company's apparent quest to produce engines with more and more power quickly and economically, corners are perhaps being cut in production in order to meet those objectives. Just sayin'.....


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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-18-2019
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My 2012 never developed the dreaded tick. It currently has 113,000 miles and has only been serviced with Ford oil and filters at intervals ranging from 6 to 8K.

If you go back and try to correlate the tick to pedigree of the engine, it was never a huge problem with the 11 and 12 models that had the oil squirter under the pistons.

The tick issue really started to escalate when Ford eliminated the oilers which was in the 13 model year when they started coating and bumping HP. And its only gotten worse as Ford squeezed more and more HP from the same cubes.

Ford really messed around starting with the 2013 and up GT. Even the torque converter in the 2012 automatic is considered the better of the S197 5.0 era.

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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019
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Don’t touch the 18-19 I have a 15 with 50,000 miles on it and not one problem with this car from the time I bought it. I would not touch the 18 or 19
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-24-2019
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Donít touch the 18-19 I have a 15 with 50,000 miles on it and not one problem with this car from the time I bought it. I would not touch the 18 or 19
What? Why would you not touch a 18 or 19 if your 15 is problem free? The 18 and 19 are both the same as your 15... OR am I missing something???

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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 04-25-2019
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The '18 and newer 5.0 Coyote engines are different from previous engines in three areas, fuel delivery, compression ratio, and cylinder wall prep. To the best of my knowledge the following will describe the differences in the various years of Coyote engines. Gen I engines from 2011-2012 have an 11:1 compression ratio and oil squirters directed at the bottoms of the pistons to cool them and help prevent detonation. They also have 1st. generation connecting rods which while adequate for most purposes are the weakest of the various Coyotes. 2013-2014 engines [ Gen I -B ? ] are basically the same as 11-12 except the oil squirters were deleted and different pistons were used. No change in compression ratio. Boss 302 engines had upgraded connecting rods [ still powered metal AKA pressed sh%* ] better heads [ ie. better flowing ports, bigger valves and stronger valve springs ] , forged pistons with larger valve reliefs [ still 11:1 ] and 13 mm lift exhaust cams vs. 12 mm on standard engines. Not absolutely sure on this , but I believe 11-12 engines had 12 mm head bolts which were reduced to 11 mm in 13. Gen II engines [ from 2015-2017 ] received some of the Boss 302 upgrades, they have Boss 302 connecting rods and what are basically Boss heads minus CNC porting. They have slightly bigger cams than Gen I engines. Compression ratio is still 11:1 and the pistons aren't forged, but do have the bigger valve reliefs. Some sort of change in oil drain back near the oil filter housing. The crankshaft was re-balanced to allow for the Boss 302 rods and new pistons. Gen III engines [2018 & newer ] have both port and direct injection. Previous engines were port only. The compression ratio was raised to 12:1. The cylinder walls are quite different. They are sprayed on rather than pressed in cast iron sleeves. Pressed in cast iron sleeves has been the standard way of building aluminum blocks for decades and is a well established technology.Sprayed on cylinder walls [ Plasma arc ] has been around at least since the mid '70's, but was generally used on either motorcycle engines or limited production automobile engines. GM first tried it on the Vega in the '70's and it was an embarrassing and expensive failure. They burned lots of oil, real mosquito foggers. Ford used it on the GT 500 in '13 &'14 and it seemed to work OK. It was also used on the GT 350. These are both limited production models and most owners don't put a lot of miles on them. The standard GT is another story, people tend to actually use these cars and so they get lots of miles just like any another car. To my knowledge the '18 and newer GT's are the first time a major manufacturer has used spray in cylinder liners in a regular production car. So far it seems to work, it's harder than cast iron liners and it should wear really well. Still there have been cases of engines with scored cylinder walls having to be replaced under warranty. Personally I prefer not to be a guinea pig, especially not on something as expensive as a new car. I think I'll wait a few years until some of these Gen III engines have 150,000-200,000 miles on them and then we'll have a much better idea of how well it really works.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-06-2019 Thread Starter
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^^^^ Awesome post! About the forged pistons: It's my understanding that the clearances between the piston skirt and the cylinder wall are greater with the forged parts when cold compared to the previous machined pistons leading to the piston slap issue. Could that also contribute to the slap when warmed? The coefficient of expansion would be different between the 2 parts. I am confident that this all was considered by the engineers. Right?

Bottom line: I am holding off on my GT purchase until there is a definitive solution to the problem. I just fear that the Mustang V8 might be closer to its demise in light of the fact that these small turbo'd 4 and 6 cyl engines are becoming terribly popular and very common. Is Ford willing to spend the money in order to fix a problem on an engine the future of which is in jeopardy anyway? I'm sure that the question has crossed Ford's mind.


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