2001 Vert, Auto, Hesitation, hoses questions - Ford Mustang Forum
 
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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-10-2014 Thread Starter
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2001 Vert, Auto, Hesitation, hoses questions

Hey all,

I wonder is there a repository with all the parts to replace all the vacuum hoses on the 4.6L? I would like to go ahead and replace them all, but wanted to know where I can find all of them, and / or part numbers for them.

I have a hesitation that I am trying to resolve. I'll also be replacing IACV, TPS, and plugs, eventually coils as well and wires if necessary.

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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-11-2014
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Little history would be good here... Such as, things you have already tried.

Also, is the Check Engine light on?

Usually with vacuum leaks - although hesitation can be one of the symptoms, more common would be things along the lines of rough or unsteady idle (but runs ok with throttle), Check Engine light (lean code). Regarding the IAC, that would only have an effect on idle (most people who experience a faulty IAC are plagued with a high rpm idle speed), so I wouldn't worry about that. Throttle Position Sensor would be different problems as well and also likely accompanied by a CEL and component specific dtc, so IMO you can rule that out for the time being.

I would start with the usual tune up items like spark plugs and fuel filter. Inexpensive and simple stuff. Inspect the coil boots for any damage or deterioration - if juice is arcing through them it can often be identified by a brownish dusty substance on the boot. Replace as necessary. When you do the plugs, be absolutely sure not to overtighten them. 11-14 lb/ft is the spec; if you don't have a torque wrench around then my own personal technique is snug tight and then bump the handle of your ratchet with your fist. Regarding gap, I like to run them a little closer than the factory .054" spec - feel free to set them at about .046" if you like.

And for the $6 it will cost you for a can of MAF cleaner, might as well do that as well. Don't use anything else but that product though, as the MAF can be easily damaged by harsh solvents lile carb cleaner, etc.



2001 GT Convertible
/1967 Coupe
All the usual bolt-on's /200 I6, C4

And a few Explorers too... 2008 4.0 XLT 4x2, 1996 XLT 5.0 4x2, 2003 Sport Trac XLT 4.0 4x4
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-11-2014 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal2V View Post
Little history would be good here... Such as, things you have already tried.

Also, is the Check Engine light on?
No CEL

Quote:
Usually with vacuum leaks - although hesitation can be one of the symptoms, more common would be things along the lines of rough or unsteady idle (but runs ok with throttle), Check Engine light (lean code).
Idle is a little lopey once the car is on for about 30 seconds. On light acceleration it's fine, slightly more than light you can feel it hesitate, then when you floor it it seems fine.

Quote:
Regarding the IAC, that would only have an effect on idle (most people who experience a faulty IAC are plagued with a high rpm idle speed), so I wouldn't worry about that. Throttle Position Sensor would be different problems as well and also likely accompanied by a CEL and component specific dtc, so IMO you can rule that out for the time being.
Gotcha, makes sense. I figured those parts are cheap enough that it couldn't hurt to replace them and hang on to the stock pieces just in case. Looks like they were never replaced in 119k.

Quote:
I would start with the usual tune up items like spark plugs and fuel filter. Inexpensive and simple stuff. Inspect the coil boots for any damage or deterioration - if juice is arcing through them it can often be identified by a brownish dusty substance on the boot. Replace as necessary. When you do the plugs, be absolutely sure not to overtighten them. 11-14 lb/ft is the spec; if you don't have a torque wrench around then my own personal technique is snug tight and then bump the handle of your ratchet with your fist. Regarding gap, I like to run them a little closer than the factory .054" spec - feel free to set them at about .046" if you like.
Thanks I will do that. I didn't look at it too closely, but it looks like some of the hoses and brackets above the COP's and plugs need to be unbolted to access all of the COP's and plugs? I will be replacing the plugs, NGK OEM's, which I believe are gapped to spec already. I will check them.

Is the fuel filter a simple item to replace?


Quote:
And for the $6 it will cost you for a can of MAF cleaner, might as well do that as well. Don't use anything else but that product though, as the MAF can be easily damaged by harsh solvents lile carb cleaner, etc.
Thanks, and good point.

I've read some that adding some Seafoam to the vacuum hose that routes from the intake to the IM is also a good idea, any thoughts on that?

I really appreciate the help.
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-11-2014
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In order to get the COP's (and plugs) out, the only thing you really need to remove is the air intake pipe. The various hoses/wires and misc. clutter can just be pushed out of the way as needed. You'll want a swivel attachment to get at the #4 plug due to how it's up near the firewall and the angle of the plug well. Just in case you've ever heard or read people saying that you need to remove the fuel rails or whatever in order to do this job, disregard that info. Pure nonsense, they don't hamper access at all.

Fuel filter is super easy. Jack up the rear of the car, it's located right in front of the fuel tank. Last time I did mine I was able to get away without using the fuel line disconnect tool, but it is a cheap tool so might wanna have it around just in case. Just pop the plastic clips and work the lines off the filter.

It is entirely possible that a vacuum leak exists, especially going on what you said in the above post regarding idle. As far as the various hoses, I would just visually inspect and replace any that are suspect. In your first post it sounded like you were wondering if there were an all inclusive kit or something that has a full set of replacement hoses and lines? So far as I'm aware, no. Luckily the vacuum line configuration on these and most halfway modern cars are pretty simple - not like cars from the 70's/80's where when you pop the hood it's just a rat's nest of rubber tubes running everywhere. Just start looking at the few that connect to the throttle body plenum and follow them. Other that what you see there, and a couple of red nylon lines that originate there as well, that's about it for vac lines. Never had to try it myself, but the trick I've always heard is with engine running to spray a small blast of carb cleaner at areas of suspected vacuum leakage - if idle temporarily improves then you just found a spot.


2001 GT Convertible
/1967 Coupe
All the usual bolt-on's /200 I6, C4

And a few Explorers too... 2008 4.0 XLT 4x2, 1996 XLT 5.0 4x2, 2003 Sport Trac XLT 4.0 4x4
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 04-11-2014
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And I've not done the Seafoam thing before... Well sort of actually, but with a different product. Friend of mine had a special bottle to put the stuff in that hung upside down so it could gravity feed and had a hose with a barbed end to connect to a vacuum line. You just let it suck it in real slowly on it's own, takes a good 20-30 minutes. At the end give it a few good revs and depending on what sort of residue was built up in your intake and supposedly also cleans up carbon buildup off the pistons, it'll blow out a fat blast of white smoke. Only time I use Seafoam is every once in a while like once a year or so if the urge hits me I'll dump a can in the gas tank if it's down to less than 1/4 full. Never notice any difference, but then again my car still runs every bit as good at 112K as it did when I bought it 7 years ago at 57K. On engines that have been subject to neglect or whatever, products such as that are probably more likely to produce noticeable results.

I got the white smoke and everything, not a lot though which I guess was indicative of my engine not being that dirty internally. Can't say I noticed any difference other than it felt good to clean some crap oit of the engine. If you're going to do it, do it before you replace the plugs as it can foul them if things are gunked up enough in there.


2001 GT Convertible
/1967 Coupe
All the usual bolt-on's /200 I6, C4

And a few Explorers too... 2008 4.0 XLT 4x2, 1996 XLT 5.0 4x2, 2003 Sport Trac XLT 4.0 4x4
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