Engine temp - what is considered hot? - Ford Mustang Forum
Like Tree2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019 Thread Starter
Apprentice
 
1carguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2014
Location: Loveland, CO-Sun Lakes,AZ
Posts: 150
 
Engine temp - what is considered hot?

I've got a '66, 289, 2bbl, C4, no AC. Engine was rebuilt about 2500 miles ago.

I had the car on the interstate for about an hour, at 65-70 mph, and the outside temp was 90-92. When I got home, and using a pistol type temp gauge directed to the radiator inlet, the thermostat housing, and the temp sending unit,I got readings at 211 - 213.

So is that considered hot?

I can go into everything I've done to the cooling system, but if 213 is the new normal, them I'm good.

Thanks for your advice.


If confusion is a destination . . . . we have arrived!
1carguy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019
PONY Member
 
07redstang's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2018
Location: Poteau
Posts: 273
 
The engine is going to go up in temp just after its turned off and sitting. Those temps are normal. What is the engine temp with extended idling and at cruise speeds. That's what you need to know.

Beechkid likes this.

07redstang is offline  
post #3 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-27-2019
PONY Member
 
Travis98146's Avatar
 
Joined: Jun 2016
Location: Seattle
Posts: 932
 
Garage
Yes, those temps are well within the proper range. Your engine temps will vary from 190-230 without being in the overheat range.
Beechkid likes this.
Travis98146 is offline  
 
post #4 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-28-2019 Thread Starter
Apprentice
 
1carguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2014
Location: Loveland, CO-Sun Lakes,AZ
Posts: 150
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 07redstang View Post
The engine is going to go up in temp just after its turned off and sitting. Those temps are normal. What is the engine temp with extended idling and at cruise speeds. That's what you need to know.
I drove the car as described, stopped in front of house, left the engine running, and immediately checked the temps, with the results as posted. I did not stop the engine, or let it sit.

With the drive on the hiway the temp rose little by little the longer I drove. I am concerned because we plan on driving to Strugis, SD, a distance of 350 miles, for the Mustang rally.

If confusion is a destination . . . . we have arrived!
1carguy is offline  
post #5 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-28-2019
PONY Member
 
dgc333's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2015
Posts: 436
 
Temps continuously climbing on the hiway is an indication your cooling system is not up to snuff.

Has the radiator been professionally cleaned? Do you have a shroud? Are you using a tgermostatic clutch fan?

If yes to these how much was the engine over bored for the rebuild. You can have over heating issues when the cylinder walls get to thin.

Dave
dgc333 is online now  
post #6 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-28-2019
PONY Member
 
JustAnotherRuki's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2014
Location: Fort Myers
Posts: 499
 
Have you ever noticed coolant leaking out through the radiator's overflow filler neck? Ever since i dropped in the 347 and put in a new electric fan controller i haven't been plagued with overheating issues again (i know how frustrating this is) My late 289 overheated alot even when i put in a 24" aluminum radiator and the electric fan. I don't think i ever found the right timing for this engine hence the overheating problems kept on coming. whenever i saw coolant leaking through the overflow tank i installed it meant she was running too hot and this started usually at 230 degrees. This s not the case with my 347, the temp reaches 220 then electric fan kicks in and temp goes down to 195- 198. It goes even lower according to the gauge when she is cruising. i've put over 2200 miles on the engine and i run it hard at times, driven the car on i-75 many times pushing 80- 85 mph and temp dont go over 200 ever. i must say the aluminum rad does a good job with this 347, but then it didn't do good with my old 289..




J


1965 Mustang Resto-Modded with a classic charm
347 ci stroker 10:1 CR ( street warrior engine with a very mild custom ROLLER cam for torque) Weiand Stealth intake ported to AFR 185 cc ,CompCams GOLD 1.6 Roller rockers ,Wiseco ProSreet Forged Pistons,Manton custom pushrods, Hedman ceramic shorties
AOD stage 1( good up to 450 HP)
Rear End 3.80 gears, Monkey Grip Trac Lock posi unit
Tires 15" all around 225's in the back
JustAnotherRuki is offline  
post #7 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-28-2019
SHELBY GT 350 Member
 
Yadkin's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2011
Location: Yadkin Valley
Posts: 6,158
 
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1carguy View Post

With the drive on the hiway the temp rose little by little the longer I drove.
As was said earlier, your system isn't doing its job. But it did when it was new so dirt and deposits in a 55 year old system is the first thing to address.

200F is the ideal coolant temperature. Plus or minus 20 degrees.

Buy an inexpensive coolant system cleaner, the kind that you drive for a few days with the stuff in it, then flush with clear water several times. Install a the best thermostat (Stant Superstat) and cap that you can find. Once it finally runs clear, use 50-50 new coolant and distilled water.

2005 4.0 MT dual exhaust GT mufflers GT suspension and wheels
Yadkin is offline  
post #8 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-28-2019 Thread Starter
Apprentice
 
1carguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2014
Location: Loveland, CO-Sun Lakes,AZ
Posts: 150
 
We have owned the car for 20 years, and it has always run hot according to the some what unreliable temp gauge.
I didn't know what the actual temps were until I got the hand held temp reader.

When the engine was rebuilt (bored .030 over) 2500 miles ago, the block was boiled out, and it has 50/50 antifreeze/distilled water. The timing is set at 10 degrees advance, and I am using a new (and tested) 13 lb radiator cap. I did install a burp tank, but nothing is burping into the tank. The new T-stat is 180, and tested with a candy thermometer. I have a 3.5 inch shroud, and the 6 blade fan is within 1-1/8' of the radiator, and the fan blades are 3.5 wide. I installed the rubber seal along the top of the radiator support at the front in an effort to direct the air into the radiator. (The 6 cyl Mustang's have this seal). I did have the radiator rebuilt, using a new core that is 1-5/16 thick. I don't know if the 1-5/16 dimension makes it a 2, 3, or 4 row radiator.

The OEM design of the radiator is goofy, with the intake and outlet on the same side of the radiator.

I could live with the temps, but I don't like how the temp kept slowly rising during the hour drive.

Thanks for all your ideas and suggestions.

If confusion is a destination . . . . we have arrived!
1carguy is offline  
post #9 of 17 (permalink) Old 07-29-2019
PONY Member
 
GT'sGT's Avatar
 
Joined: Apr 2018
Posts: 933
 
Yes, your engine is at operating temperature or hot. It is not overheating.
GT'sGT is offline  
PONY Member
 
07redstang's Avatar
 
Joined: Aug 2018
Location: Poteau
Posts: 273
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1carguy View Post
...
I could live with the temps, but I don't like how the temp kept slowly rising during the hour drive.

Thanks for all your ideas and suggestions.
What are the temps rising to?

07redstang is offline  
PONY Member
 
baylensmanfl's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Location: largo
Posts: 572
 
The gauge is a ground activated coil. As the engine is on longer and the heat soaks into the block the resistance of the sending unit natural lowers causing the "guage" to read higher even though the temp remains the same. The same happens to the coiled spring on the back of the guage face.
Opionins on what is overheated will vary. Reading in the 65 ford shop manual the in place 13# pressure cap should raised the boil over point to well above the recommend operating temperature of 210 to 220 degrees. Many fans of the Small block chevy have chased lower and lower temps Due to issues with fuel delivery. Many folks assume that it is the same with a small block FORD. but not so. Ford has always designed their engine to run significantly better at warmer temps. The next time you get gauge creep. take your pyrometer and pull over and check the temp. I believe you will find that you are still in the "recommended" range.

You may consider adding a radiator to hood seal to direct more air thru the radiator instead of over it. The seal was used on 6 cylinder cars with their Lower engine rpm and on early cars with field installed A/C. Avaialbe from most aftermarket mustang vendors for around $10

AS mentioned by others above if planning a long trip for your own piece of mind. a good radiator flush and fill with 50/50 coolant might be just what you need

I'D RATHER GO SLOW THAN NOT GO AT ALL
baylensmanfl is offline  
SHELBY GT 350 Member
Classic Member
 
Ivy66GT's Avatar
 
Joined: Dec 2008
Location: Albuquerque
Posts: 7,932
 
That fact that nothing goes into your overflow tank answers your question: You are not running hot.

By new car standards you are running too cold. Coolant cycles back and forth into the overflow on a factory-overflow car every time its used.

From the factory you would have had a 192F thermostat which doesn't even open fully for a six until 214F. 50/50 antifreeze at 13 psi does not boil until 250F which was the right side, H, mark on the temp gauge. The only reason absolute temp matters is you want to avoid boiling since vapors won't cool your engine very well. At your temps you are a long way from boiling.

There are no springs in a factory temp gauge for your car so forget that explanation. Its essentially a bimetallic strip that bends and deflects the needle when electricity heats the internals of the gauge. It was never intended to be highly accurate but simple and cheap to build. Only an hour isn't a very long drive and your engine may still be warming up for that time. If you had an accurate oil temperature gauge you would understand that coolant heats to t-stat temps more quickly than the engine in general. What happens during an 8 hour drive?

Bottom line is you have no temperature problems to worry about. Enjoy your car.
Ivy66GT is offline  
PONY Member
 
JustAnotherRuki's Avatar
 
Joined: Oct 2014
Location: Fort Myers
Posts: 499
 
I agree with Ivy, if that overflow is not spewing coolant you should be just fine. Perhaps you could install a temp gauge to make you feel more at ease.


J


1965 Mustang Resto-Modded with a classic charm
347 ci stroker 10:1 CR ( street warrior engine with a very mild custom ROLLER cam for torque) Weiand Stealth intake ported to AFR 185 cc ,CompCams GOLD 1.6 Roller rockers ,Wiseco ProSreet Forged Pistons,Manton custom pushrods, Hedman ceramic shorties
AOD stage 1( good up to 450 HP)
Rear End 3.80 gears, Monkey Grip Trac Lock posi unit
Tires 15" all around 225's in the back
JustAnotherRuki is offline  
PONY Member
 
baylensmanfl's Avatar
 
Joined: Feb 2017
Location: largo
Posts: 572
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivy66GT View Post
That fact that nothing goes into your overflow tank answers your question: You are not running hot.

By new car standards you are running too cold. Coolant cycles back and forth into the overflow on a factory-overflow car every time its used.

From the factory you would have had a 192F thermostat which doesn't even open fully for a six until 214F. 50/50 antifreeze at 13 psi does not boil until 250F which was the right side, H, mark on the temp gauge. The only reason absolute temp matters is you want to avoid boiling since vapors won't cool your engine very well. At your temps you are a long way from boiling.

There are no springs in a factory temp gauge for your car so forget that explanation. Its essentially a bimetallic strip that bends and deflects the needle when electricity heats the internals of the gauge. It was never intended to be highly accurate but simple and cheap to build. Only an hour isn't a very long drive and your engine may still be warming up for that time. If you had an accurate oil temperature gauge you would understand that coolant heats to t-stat temps more quickly than the engine in general. What happens during an 8 hour drive?

Bottom line is you have no temperature problems to worry about. Enjoy your car.
By spring I was referring to the coiled bi-metalic strip. It is easier for some to understand that way. However yes bi-metalic strips can "fatigue" over time or at a certain temperature range and are notoriously inaccurate over the long haul which is why changing you household thermostat to digital can acutely save money a very short time.

I'D RATHER GO SLOW THAN NOT GO AT ALL
baylensmanfl is offline  
post #15 of 17 (permalink) Old 08-01-2019 Thread Starter
Apprentice
 
1carguy's Avatar
 
Joined: Jul 2014
Location: Loveland, CO-Sun Lakes,AZ
Posts: 150
 
Thanks everybody.


If confusion is a destination . . . . we have arrived!
1carguy is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Ford Mustang Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a VALID email address for yourself, otherwise you will not receive the necessary confirmation email needed to confirm, validate and activate your new AFM member account.

Failure to provide a VALID email address, will result in the cancellation of your new AFM member account registration.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome
 


Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.1