Trying to identify my carburetor - Ford Mustang Forum
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post #1 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-31-2019 Thread Starter
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Trying to identify my carburetor

I have recently purchased my first 1965 mustang 289. The previous owner has change some things on the car. I am trying to figure out what carburetor is on it but unable to locate any makings. I am thinking it is an auto 4100? Thoughts?

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post #2 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-31-2019
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Well, I can't tell you what it is, but it's not a 4100, or its later, crummier cousin, the 4300 either. It's not a Quadrajet or a typical Holley. It looks vaguely familiar somehow, but I just can't place it.


The 4100 has a very distinctive design with a bowl front and rear. Its fuel inlet sticks out toward the front of the car, offset to the passenger side. The 4300 has a center fuel inlet in the front, angled off toward the driver's side. This thing looks like fuel is passenger rear? WEIRD.


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post #3 of 13 (permalink) Old 10-31-2019
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Your carb is either an old Carter AFB or an early Edelbrock Performer series. Basically the same carbs. Best guess its a Carter.
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post #4 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-01-2019 Thread Starter
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Thank you. I think I might change the carburetor. This is a stock 289 what would be the best carburetor to look into?
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post #5 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-01-2019
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For a 289, I'd go with a 4100 (if you just happened to have one, or knew someone who had one with the 1.08 venturi). If it's a really hot 289, you could use one with the bigger 1.12's. Unfortunately, 4100's are getting pretty scarce these days.

The Summit M-series carbs are a direct descendant of the 4100s, and have some really nice features. They are easier to tune, and even look a lot like the Autolites. For a mild build, I'd get the 500 CFM version. If you intend to upgrade heads, cam, intake, and exhaust, you could use the 600 CFM version easily. These carbs also happen to be cheap, but despite their $300 price tag, they offer features you don't start to see on other carbs till around $600 or more.

Both the 4100 and M-series carbs use annular boosters. "So what? How does this help me?" you may ask. Well, for any street driven car, good fuel atomization is the name of the game. Unlike other booster types, annular boosters deliver a very fine spray of fuel, and do so with very little signal (pulses from the intake). Since liquid gasoline does not burn, only the vapors, this means that a lot less gasoline goes out the tailpipe, and more of it is burned. For economy, power, throttle response, and general simplicity, both the 4100 and the Summit carbs are truly excellent. They even do well for most performance engines.

For extreme power production, (think professional drag racing) annular boosters are not typically used. This is because when gasoline is so finely atomized it becomes nothing but vapor in the intake, it takes up more room than liquid droplets. This can displace some of the oxygen. For a car that does not care about economy at all, a Holley with cheap downleg boosters can probably deliver a few percent more peak horsepower at wide open throttle, if it's tuned to take advantage.

However, in all other driving conditions - like part throttle, cruise, and, well, every other situation, where your car literally spends 99% of its life as a street car - the annular boosters are superior. Your car will have more average power, and far better economy. I am not just speaking from theory, books, and what I learned on the internet, I've experienced this and proven it to be true on my own car. I foolishly 'upgraded' my car from a 4100 to a Holley 600 carb when I was a kid, and frankly, there was no comparison.



Hope this helps! =)

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post #6 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-01-2019 Thread Starter
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Thank you for advise. I was looking into the summits and also the 500cfm Edelbrock. This is going to be a good Sunday car for family. Keeping it mostly stock for now.
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post #7 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-01-2019
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Originally Posted by CalCoop View Post
I have recently purchased my first 1965 mustang 289. The previous owner has change some things on the car. I am trying to figure out what carburetor is on it but unable to locate any makings. I am thinking it is an auto 4100? Thoughts?
It looks like a Carter 625 cfm with electric choke model 9635 no longer sold and replaced by Edelbrock model 1406 600 cfm.



The way you can tell if it is a Carter 625 CFM is that the primary under the choke is slightly smaller (300cfm) in bore than the secondarys (325cfm). The Edelbrock 1406 has the electric choke and the primarys and secondarys are the same size at 300 cfm each.
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post #8 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-01-2019
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Originally Posted by CalCoop View Post
Thank you for advise. I was looking into the summits and also the 500cfm Edelbrock. This is going to be a good Sunday car for family. Keeping it mostly stock for now.
Whats wrong with the carb that's on it? Worst case you can throw a kit in it and be good for another 10-15years. The carb you have is probably better than the newer versions with the exception of a Edelbrock AVS.

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post #9 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-01-2019 Thread Starter
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The carb that is on it won’t start when cold until I Give it a little starter fluid. When driving it and try to speed from 45 it will bog before acceleration.
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Sounds like choke issues! But to be fair, that carb is a little big for a stock 289.

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I've used that same carb, if its a Carter, long before Edelbrock acquired the rights to its design back in the 70's on many SBF engines with no issues.

It could be a choke or starting technique issue. Did you pump the gas 2 times prior to turning the key? I looks like the butterfly is set correctly. When the engine is cold, before you do anything look down into the carb and see if there are 2 solid sprays of fuel while you operate the throttle by hand. Are you using relatively fresh fuel or had the car been sitting for some time?

It can also be a weak spark, poor timing settings, fouled plugs, weak coil, bad points, corroded cap contacts, worn rotor, vacuum leak, etc...

The bog could be attributed to some of the above also. I would start with paragragh 1 and then move towards checking the condition of your tune and ignition parts.

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post #12 of 13 (permalink) Old 11-02-2019 Thread Starter
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Sounds like choke issues! But to be fair, that carb is a little big for a stock 289.
After doing a little more searching and cleaning I noticed it has a cobra aluminum intake manifold. So now I am in search of what has been modified. Thank you guys for your knowledge.
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Cal, no matter what your engine is, when it comes to tuning, start with ignition. Make sure you check to see where TDC is, by pulling a plug and finding it - don't believe the timing marks on your damper till you prove 'em right. Once you do that, set the timing where it should be. Timing and ignition generally are where the biggest gains are going to be seen, when you're tuning anyway, not to mention being something relatively easy to get 'close' and prove to be right.

Once that's down, then you can start to deal with the more subtle art of fuel and air delivery. Tuning a carb isn't as simple, but you can read up on your particular model and find a lot of information on what to adjust - if you even need to once you get your timing right.

Figuring out what cam and heads you have got might take some more sleuthing, and even disassembly to be sure about, since you don't know what's already been done to it. Thankfully, you can just tune it to what the engine actually likes without knowing the specifics of its parts. It's not ideal, but it's not that hard, especially since you already have it running.


Have fun, and good luck. =)

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