1964-1968 6 Cylinder Carburetor Guide - Ford Mustang Forum
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post #1 of 49 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014 Thread Starter
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Post 1964-1968 6 Cylinder Carburetor Guide

Ok guys. I've started to notice that 6 cylinder Mustangs are starting to pick up in popularity. And with this, I've also noticed a rise in carburetor problems. Well, this thread is going to try and help my fellow 6 cylinder owners make sure they have the right information regarding what carburetor they need. At the bottom I'll include a link to a site with some really good in depth information on how the problems work.

I've seen more than one thread, on this forum and others, where owners were having trouble with stumbling and stalling when trying to pull away from a stop and rattling under heavy throttle (this is actually pre-detonation, we'll get to that in a bit). I've heard people saying it's jet size, float level, fuel mixture, but in reality, it is something much more simple than that... it's simply the wrong carburetor. And after working on 31 (yes, I've rebuilt 31) Autolite 1100 carburetors in the last 6 years I hope to help you guys make sure you have the right carburetor on your Mustang so you don't have the same problem I did.

Just as a heads up warning, if you do have the wrong Autolite 1100 and your have pre-detonation (sounds sort of like a rattling sound) LET OFF. I learned the hard way... That is the fastest way to an engine rebuild as it blew the oil rings and the sides of one of my pistons to pieces. I was lucky it didn't damage anything else and I only had to re-hone the cylinder walls.

Right, so how can you tell if you have the right or wrong Autolite 1100. There were 4 varients of the Autolite 1100 used on the Mustang from 1965-1967, 2 for manual transmission cars and 2 for automatic transmission cars. The difference between the automatic and manual 1100s is a second pump. On manual transmission versions, there is 1 accelerator pump, located on the driver side of the carburetor. On automatic transmission versions there is a 2nd pump, located on the passenger side. This pump is there to help keep the car from stumbling or stalling when pulling away.. It's called the Anti-stall dashpot. You can use an automatic “double pumper” on a manual transmission equipped car (it won't do anything), but you can't use a manual trans carb on an automatic equipped car.

Now, as I previously stated there are 2 different versions of each of these, and this is where it becomes slightly complicated. From 1965-1967 Ford used what was called the “Load-O-Matic” distributor on all 6 cylinder Mustang's that WERE NOT to be sold in California (we'll cover that in a bit). The Load-O-Matic distributor is only equipped with a vacuum advance. Now most distributors use a mix of manifold (or ported) vacuum, and centrifugal weights to compensate for speed and load. Manifold vacuum is very high when under light load, but as you accelerate it becomes weaker. Since that will not provide an adequate source of vacuum, Ford came up with a solution called the “Spark Control Valve”. It looks like a little wheel near the vacuum line input. This valve switches the Load-O-Matic's vacuum source between manifold (for light acceleration) and venturi vacuum (for load/speed)

Cars that were destined to be sold in California (such as my 1966 Sprint 200) were doomed to be equipped with a “Thermactor Emissions System”. Mercifully cars equipped with the emissions system got a standard dual advance distributor. These cars came equipped with a NON Spark Control Valve Autolite 1100 carb. The problem that I faced and people putting the SCV carb on their dual advance equipped cars is that under load the distributor is getting maximum advance because of both the venturi vacuum and the centrifugal weights trying to advance the distributor at the same time. This is what will cause the pre-detonation that will hurt your engines.

Starting in 1968 Ford did away with the Load-O-Matic distributor and the spark control valve and all cars gained the non SCV carburetor and dual advance distributor. Unfortunately, due to the high sales of 49 state Mustangs from 1965-1967 this means the market is absolutely flooded by the SCV 1100s. And many people over the years have bought cars that have had the horsepower sapping, useless emissions systems ripped out and thrown away, and as carburetors have worn out owners have bought the first cheap Autolite 1100 they find, just to pull their hair out trying to get the car to run correctly. For those of us who have the dual advance distributor, we also have the ability to (relatively) easily switch to an Autolite 2100 (2 barrel) or a Weber carburetor for improved performance and fuel economy (these both mix the air & fuel better than our little 1100). Owners of Load-O-Matic cars will need to either source a 1968 dual advance distributor or find a Duraspark distributor (available from Classic Inlines) but you'll have to change the carburetor at the same time.

I've attached 3 pictures, each labeled (couldn't find a non SCV manual trans carburetor). I hope this long (sorry) article is helpful to my fellow 6 cylinder owners. Michael

Conversion kits (carburetor and distributors) are available through

Classic Inlines Performance Parts - Home

For more in depth reading on the Load-O-Matic and SCV, here is their article.

Classic Inlines Ford Six Load-O-Matic Distributor & Spark Control Valve

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1966 Mustang Sprint 200 "Oliver"... factory fog lamps, factory rally pac, off the road for restoration.

2005 Mustang 4.0 litre... Airaid CAI, Honeycomb taillamp panel, more mods to follow.
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post #2 of 49 (permalink) Old 01-12-2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 66Sprint200 View Post
Ok guys. I've started to notice that 6 cylinder Mustangs are starting to pick up in popularity. And with this, I've also noticed a rise in carburetor problems. Well, this thread is going to try and help my fellow 6 cylinder owners make sure they have the right information regarding what carburetor they need. At the bottom I'll include a link to a site with some really good in depth information on how the problems work.

I've seen more than one thread, on this forum and others, where owners were having trouble with stumbling and stalling when trying to pull away from a stop and rattling under heavy throttle (this is actually pre-detonation, we'll get to that in a bit). I've heard people saying it's jet size, float level, fuel mixture, but in reality, it is something much more simple than that... it's simply the wrong carburetor. And after working on 31 (yes, I've rebuilt 31) Autolite 1100 carburetors in the last 6 years I hope to help you guys make sure you have the right carburetor on your Mustang so you don't have the same problem I did.

Just as a heads up warning, if you do have the wrong Autolite 1100 and your have pre-detonation (sounds sort of like a rattling sound) LET OFF. I learned the hard way... That is the fastest way to an engine rebuild as it blew the oil rings and the sides of one of my pistons to pieces. I was lucky it didn't damage anything else and I only had to re-hone the cylinder walls.

Right, so how can you tell if you have the right or wrong Autolite 1100. There were 4 varients of the Autolite 1100 used on the Mustang from 1965-1967, 2 for manual transmission cars and 2 for automatic transmission cars. The difference between the automatic and manual 1100s is a second pump. On manual transmission versions, there is 1 accelerator pump, located on the driver side of the carburetor. On automatic transmission versions there is a 2nd pump, located on the passenger side. This pump is there to help keep the car from stumbling or stalling when pulling away.. It's called the Anti-stall dashpot. You can use an automatic “double pumper” on a manual transmission equipped car (it won't do anything), but you can't use a manual trans carb on an automatic equipped car.

Now, as I previously stated there are 2 different versions of each of these, and this is where it becomes slightly complicated. From 1965-1967 Ford used what was called the “Load-O-Matic” distributor on all 6 cylinder Mustang's that WERE NOT to be sold in California (we'll cover that in a bit). The Load-O-Matic distributor is only equipped with a vacuum advance. Now most distributors use a mix of manifold (or ported) vacuum, and centrifugal weights to compensate for speed and load. Manifold vacuum is very high when under light load, but as you accelerate it becomes weaker. Since that will not provide an adequate source of vacuum, Ford came up with a solution called the “Spark Control Valve”. It looks like a little wheel near the vacuum line input. This valve switches the Load-O-Matic's vacuum source between manifold (for light acceleration) and venturi vacuum (for load/speed)

Cars that were destined to be sold in California (such as my 1966 Sprint 200) were doomed to be equipped with a “Thermactor Emissions System”. Mercifully cars equipped with the emissions system got a standard dual advance distributor. These cars came equipped with a NON Spark Control Valve Autolite 1100 carb. The problem that I faced and people putting the SCV carb on their dual advance equipped cars is that under load the distributor is getting maximum advance because of both the venturi vacuum and the centrifugal weights trying to advance the distributor at the same time. This is what will cause the pre-detonation that will hurt your engines.

Starting in 1968 Ford did away with the Load-O-Matic distributor and the spark control valve and all cars gained the non SCV carburetor and dual advance distributor. Unfortunately, due to the high sales of 49 state Mustangs from 1965-1967 this means the market is absolutely flooded by the SCV 1100s. And many people over the years have bought cars that have had the horsepower sapping, useless emissions systems ripped out and thrown away, and as carburetors have worn out owners have bought the first cheap Autolite 1100 they find, just to pull their hair out trying to get the car to run correctly. For those of us who have the dual advance distributor, we also have the ability to (relatively) easily switch to an Autolite 2100 (2 barrel) or a Weber carburetor for improved performance and fuel economy (these both mix the air & fuel better than our little 1100). Owners of Load-O-Matic cars will need to either source a 1968 dual advance distributor or find a Duraspark distributor (available from Classic Inlines) but you'll have to change the carburetor at the same time.

I've attached 3 pictures, each labeled (couldn't find a non SCV manual trans carburetor). I hope this long (sorry) article is helpful to my fellow 6 cylinder owners. Michael

Conversion kits (carburetor and distributors) are available through

Classic Inlines Performance Parts - Home

For more in depth reading on the Load-O-Matic and SCV, here is their article.

Classic Inlines Ford Six Load-O-Matic Distributor & Spark Control Valve
Great article!. Best yet

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post #3 of 49 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014
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ugh, don't tell me this is the start to a mountain of stickies again. The stickies aren't read, which is why we always have the same questions regardless of the stickies that were addressing them. Hence the reason we took them down.

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post #4 of 49 (permalink) Old 01-15-2014
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Since this thread is going to be read by six cylinder owners I wanted to mention that the mustang six association is trying to get started so more members would help. Here's one of the emails from the founder.

"Announcing**** the**** Reactivation**** of**** the**** MUSTANG**** SIX**** ASSOCIATION

Which is devoted to all1964-1/2*through 1973 six cylinder*Mustangs*and*their*owners who are*associated with these*historically significant first pony cars from Ford. There will be no cost to join.

*

We plan to publish frequent*e-newsletters with stories*and photo essays*about the*six cylinder Mustangs. Every member will have an opportunity to publish*a story or see their digital images published through our e-publications*in our Association.*

*

Send an email to Rick Mitchell [email protected]*if you are interested in learning more."

*

1967 Sport Sprint 200, 3 speed standard, Midnight Blue, June 7. No A/C, manual steering and drum brakes. Added dual exhaust and front disc brakes.
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post #5 of 49 (permalink) Old 01-15-2014
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I rarely post because the answers to my questions almost certainly have been discussed before and I search and find the answer. A great example of this is this sticky! I have been poking around various sites researching carbs and tuning and then this sticky pops up. Exactly what I need to know. I would suspect that there are a lot of people out there similar to me. Thank you for making this a sticky!!!!
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post #6 of 49 (permalink) Old 01-24-2014
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When sending an email to [email protected], I get a message that there is something wrong with the email address. I am interested in the six cylinder group. Is there another contact. Thanks.
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post #7 of 49 (permalink) Old 05-25-2014
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I just bought a carb from O'Reilly's and it stalls when you hard accelerate from a dead stop just like the one I just replaced.
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post #8 of 49 (permalink) Old 06-05-2014
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I still have popping when I decelerate and I have the correct tuned 1100 Autolite

1967 Sport Sprint 200, 3 speed standard, Midnight Blue, June 7. No A/C, manual steering and drum brakes. Added dual exhaust and front disc brakes.
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post #9 of 49 (permalink) Old 06-29-2014
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Manual carb on an automatic.

I have a 66 200 CI automatic.
First, I REALLY appreciate this article. It may have clarified my carb problem. I am attaching a picture of my carb. According to this article my carb goes with a manual transmission car.. Can someone confirm this is correct? I have an automatic.
Thanks in advance.
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Manual carb on automatic - continued

I also wanted to include a picture of the carb from the other side.
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That carb is for an automatic since it has an accelerator pump on one side and a dashpot on the other.
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Hello, I am thinking of upgrading my 1968 Mustang with a weber carburetor to get better performance and I've read a couple articles and they all say you need to replace the distributor when replacing your carburetor but I don't see why I would need to do that at all. I have a 1968 so that means I have the dual vacuum and the new carburetor wouldn't really be that much different than my existing holley 1940 so I don't really understand how it would change anything with my distributor and how its functioning. If you or anyone can shine some light on this is would be much appreciated.
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Reply to slvknight

Hi Knight, I did the described upgrade and I did NOTHING to my distributor. I have a '66 so my distributor and carb was a bit different from yours, but I don't think that a swap would involve the distributor.
One thing you do need to consider is the vacuum source for your vacuum advance. I changed my distributor a couple of years ago to a later model ('78) one to incorporate electronic ignition. At that time I was led to believe that the ported vacuum produced by the Autolite 1100 would not work with the newer distributor. So, I tapped into a vacuum source on the manifold. Never did run right! When I made the conversion to the Weber 32/36 I researched it again and the Weber provided the proper ported vacuum needed by the '78 distributor. Now, the combination runs like a dream. The only complaint I have is the electric choke I ordered with my 32/36 pulls the choke off really quickly. I'd prefer it to remain on a little longer so the engine could warm up a bit more than it does now.
Hope this info helps you with your upgrade.
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I have a Weber 32/36 on a 200 CI in my wife's 66 Mustang. I am having trouble when idling in gear. I seem to have it all timed correct and the carb adjusted for good fuel/air mixture. What happens it runs rough when in gear at idle, almost like its being starved for fuel. The odd thing is it doesn't happen all the time. When parked at idle after warming up it runs great. I can rev up the throttle and when it comes back to idle it sounds and runs great.

Any ideas why it keeps stalling or dying when in drive or reverse at idle or starting to accelerate?
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I own a 67 mustang with a 6 cylinder 200 engine and manual 3 speed transmission. I recently had the engine rebuilt. The distributor is for engines with the thermactor emissions. There is no emissions on the car. I am replacing the 1100 carb because it is for automatic transmissions, my question is should I replace the distributor too. I am so confused on all the stuff I have read and just need a plain answer....thanks

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