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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have heard I can use the rear end out of a 1999 explorer for a 1968 mustang .
Could I use the steering components as well? What other parts ?
 

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1967 Mercury Cougar XR7
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While the 8.8 differential is a good one, you may discover that this is not a simple nor easy swap if you don't have welding skills. Your 8" rear end is actually quite good. If you want an overdrive transmission, consider changing out your gears for something in the 3.55-4.10 range, and putting in a limited slip unit.

The engine and transmission are both good units in a '99 Explorer - if it has the 5.0 HO. The truck cam is awful, and the valvesprings are as well, but with those replaced (even with a stock Mustang 5.0 HO cam) it's a great little engine, and the 4R70W transmission is fantastic.

Steering stuff on the Exploders won't work.

If you need help with fixing up your Mustang's steering, it's not hard to do, and believe it or not, your factory stuff can be made very good with just a little effort. You don't need to chop it up and use other parts. =)

Welcome to AFM!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
While the 8.8 differential is a good one, you may discover that this is not a simple nor easy swap if you don't have welding skills. Your 8" rear end is actually quite good. If you want an overdrive transmission, consider changing out your gears for something in the 3.55-4.10 range, and putting in a limited slip unit.

The engine and transmission are both good units in a '99 Explorer - if it has the 5.0 HO. The truck cam is awful, and the valvesprings are as well, but with those replaced (even with a stock Mustang 5.0 HO cam) it's a great little engine, and the 4R70W transmission is fantastic.

Steering stuff on the Exploders won't work.

If you need help with fixing up your Mustang's steering, it's not hard to do, and believe it or not, your factory stuff can be made very good with just a little effort. You don't need to chop it up and use other parts. =)

Welcome to AFM!
Thanks for the info. Unfortunately the explorer is a v6 . I was going to do a stroker kit and add afr heads goal of 500hp 450 torque. Getting a tremec tko 600. Do you think the stock rear end with gear change and detroit locker would be as strong as the explorer 8.8 with 3.73 and limited slip? Also the explore rear end has disc brakes which my factory doesn't have.

Seems like the explorer rear end for $300 and welding some brackets kills 3 birds with 1 stone -
1. 3.73 gears
2. Limited slip diff.
3. Disc brakes.
 

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1967 Mercury Cougar XR7
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Thanks for the info. Unfortunately the explorer is a v6 . I was going to do a stroker kit and add afr heads goal of 500hp 450 torque. Getting a tremec tko 600. Do you think the stock rear end with gear change and detroit locker would be as strong as the explorer 8.8 with 3.73 and limited slip? Also the explore rear end has disc brakes which my factory doesn't have.

Seems like the explorer rear end for $300 and welding some brackets kills 3 birds with 1 stone -
1. 3.73 gears
2. Limited slip diff.
3. Disc brakes.
Given your power levels, I think it would depend mostly on how you intend to drive the car. If you are going to run street tires, whatever 'extra' power your drivetrain can't transmit to the ground will just show up as extra tire smoke. Drum brakes in the rear are nothing to worry about for one or two stops - and actually have better braking than most discs, if they're reasonably maintained. They just can't shed heat as well, and thus are unsuited to track use. They are lighter than most discs as well.

Upside to the 8"? Lighter, less friction = more power to the ground and better ride quality. Easy to install (because it's already in there!)
Downside? Not quite as strong as 8.8, unsuited to drag racing with slicks, especially with manual transmission high RPM launches on a 3000+ lb car. There are guys who drag these, and even do wheelstands, so it's not a complete wimp. =)

Upside to 8.8? Comes with discs and limited slip 3.73 gears. Slightly stronger than 8".
Downside? Requires a lot of welding. Axles have c-clips for retainers, which requires modification to make it safe for drag racing. More hypoid offset means slightly less power to the ground. Heavier than 8". Factory limited slip unit is nothing to write home about, and requires regular maintenance to replace friction materials. May have fitment issues in regard to width, which requires a lot of tinkering with axle tubes and axle widths. (Measure carefully!)

If it tells you anything, I went with a good Torsen 3.55 limited slip pumpkin for my 8" rear end, and it will go behind a stout 331 stroker with 8 stack EFI, ported '69 351W heads, and a 4R70W transmission. However, I will be keeping mine on the street, and don't intend to run slicks, either. Should last forever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Excellent response. Are you upgrading to 31 splines or staying w 28?

Also where did you purchase your torsen limited slip and how much?

Also looked at swapping in a near 9" and can go that route race built for $2k.
 

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Excellent response. Are you upgrading to 31 splines or staying w 28?

Also where did you purchase your torsen limited slip and how much?

Also looked at swapping in a near 9" and can go that route race built for $2k.
Honestly, any 9" is a good choice if you never want to be able to break things. =) Better than the 8.8 in every regard (or 8"!), except of course it's heavy, and uses a little more power. The "power" thing here is only a 4% difference between an 8" and 9", so even that's not the end of the world. 8.8 is in between the two, but has all the weird axle tube mods and c-clip business to deal with.

I bought all my stuff from a guy in Arizona! I'll try to find that info and get it to you a bit later today. Altogether, it cost me around $750 if I remember right. Brand new pumpkin, gears, and limited slip unit, shipped to my house.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Honestly, any 9" is a good choice if you never want to be able to break things. =) Better than the 8.8 in every regard (or 8"!), except of course it's heavy, and uses a little more power. The "power" thing here is only a 4% difference between an 8" and 9", so even that's not the end of the world. 8.8 is in between the two, but has all the weird axle tube mods and c-clip business to deal with.

I bought all my stuff from a guy in Arizona! I'll try to find that info and get it to you a bit later today. Altogether, it cost me around $750 if I remember right. Brand new pumpkin, gears, and limited slip unit, shipped to my house.
I think your right 9" is the cheapest to replace if your into breaking things. I did read that if you build a strong 8" that is comparable to a 9" you will spend as much $$ . I have had a 66 mustang 289 4 speed and my 68 cougar c-4 and both were not hot engines.

Having that tremec 5 speed and 500hp I am wondering how much abuse I would be able to deliver to the rear end? 4000rpm clutch dump could happen ? I am coming close to the time men have a mid-life crisis , so leaning toward insurance policy of the 9".

I appreciate your input and will do more research. Pulling motor the motor and taking to my engine builder tomorrow.
 
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