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I feel a little in over my head. I inherited my mom's 1964 mustang which I have done some work on over the years but I am now looking in to really taking on fixing it up. I am wondering if the fuel injection is working correctly as when I stop a a red light it will stall however if I put it in park when I stop and slightly hold my foot on the gas petal it will not stall.
 

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Why do you say 'fuel injection'? Do you mean carburetor? To my medium knowledge, the early Mustangs did not come with FI. Is this a replacement engine? Give us the type of engine, trans, and a photo or two to help us figure this out.

There are many reasons a carb could be stalling out. The mixture is off, the cold idle is set too low, the hot idle screw is set to low, and a few others.
 

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Simply because I have no idea about this car. I am very interested in learning how to work on it and what not. Being in Alaska I have limited resources.

It is a replacement engine (289 v8), Auto trans., I will try to figure out how to load some pictures.

Thank you!
 
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hi. we need the brand of carb. see if the points are burnt. check the gap it should be .012 to .014. clean the inside of distributor cap. sounds like an air leak or plugged idle circuit. at idle turn the fuel mix screw out 1 turn for 10 seconds then in all the way. if it has n affect your idle circuit is prob plugged. also plug off all vacuun to carb including pcv at the carb. if it is still bad spray flammable brake cleaner using long nozzle gently at the carb base. if your idle goes up you have a leak. also nake sure the choke is fully open. a
 

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Goodafternoon.. I think it would bea good idea for you to contact some local \mustang owners. One fellow goes by the name 6T6Coupe, He is from Wasilla about one hrs drive north. With spring on the way I'm sure their will be local shows and or a cruse or 3.

Dave.
 

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Okay, here's my 2 cts. I don't know what your temperatures are up there, but if it is cold most of the time, you would probably need to get a stock air breather with the tube that goes down to the exhaust manifold and the other piece that goes on the exhaust manifold, this allows preheated air to enter the carburetor, it improves gas mileage and fuel vaporization at colder temperatures, if you don't drive the car much, then it may not be worth it. Since it is stalling, if you have an automatic transmission, there should be a dashpot (looking at your pictures I don't see one) on the carburetor where the linkage moves the throttle, this slows the closing of the throttle when you let off the gas to help keep an engine from stalling, to adjust it, you have the engine off, open the throttle, and let it go, when the lever touches the dashpot plunger it should slow the final closing to about 1-2 seconds. If it is okay, then you need to check the carburetor idle speed and idle mixture, the engine should be at normal operating temperature, the idle speed is usually a adjusting screw by the throttle near the bottom of the carb rearward, screwing it in clockwise raises the idle speed and the reverse lowers it, with your foot on the brake, place the transmission in drive, you should feel a jolt as the transmission engages but it should not be severe, on a level surface if you removed your foot off the brake the car should creep forward or on a slight incline upward it should hold the car, if it is not doing that then raise the idle speed a little and retest. Next is the idle mixture screws(2 screws), they are under the float bowl in the front of the carb, they are brass and require a small long flat blade screwdriver to adjust them, with the car in park, the engine running, start with one of the screws and back it out until the engine loads (gets rough usually a turn or two) then screw it in slowly, the engine should start to smooth out and idle a little faster, turn it in until you get the smoothest and fastest idle for that screw, then back the screw out 1/4 (ccw) of a turn (the engine likes it a little on the rich side for most conditions), then repeat this procedure for the other screw, then repeat this procedure for both screws again, just in case they were way off, if they were off just a little, then it is probably not necessary to repeat. Then double check your idle speed, as it may have changed, if you have to lower or raise it very much, then you much repeat the idle mixture adjustments, as they interact. Then if the car no longer stalls when warmed up, you are halfway there, the warm side done, if the car stalls when cold, then the choke will have to be adjusted. Post your results. Good Luck.
 

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You have a carburetor; what brand we can't tell from the photos. The only 'common' cars with fuel injection in '66 were European ones like Mercedes and even most of them still used carburetors well into the 70s and 80s.

As usual, Rex gave some pretty useful suggestions. The temps in Anchorage now are not all that wintery but cool; a good choke would help.

Jon, you need to get a shop manual, Chapter 9, Ignition. The points in a stock, 289 distributor are set to 17 thou and not 12 - 14. You aren't helping members by giving them incorrect information. If it were a HiPo the point setting was 20.
 

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For someone with little knowledge I think a lot of the good advice was way over this guy's head.

Could you please take off the air cleaner and give some close-up photos of the carburetor. Front and each side. There are a number of makers and each has their own way of doing things. If it says Holley on the front, there will be some numbers stamped on the vertical face of the part that would go inside the air cleaner. Need a good close-up of those.

I suggest you do some self education on carbureted engines and look at some of the you tube videos on line.
 
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