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Discussion Starter #1
I picked up a carburetor for my 1968 200 L6 since the original was missing when I got the car. I got it from a classic mustang salvage yard and I think it came from a 1966 Mustang but I'm not sure. The ID tag reads, "FoMoCo C50F Y A 5HA"

The disassembly and cleaning was going along fine until I hit a snag. The throttle plate on the bottom side of the carburetor (the side that bolts to the intake, opposite the air cleaner bracket) is rusted tight. The shaft will not move at all. I got the two screws out of the shaft that hold the throttle blade in but because the blade is in the closed position I can't slide the blade out. I soaked the carb in a WD-40 bath over night, then I tried spraying it with PB Blaster several times and tapped on the shaft, then I tried heating the flange with a propane torch around the shaft and then sprayed it with more penetrating oil. All to no avail.

I'm not sure what else to try. Should I just keep this carb around for spare parts and get a different core to rebuild?

Thanks
 

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A few hours in a carb cleaner bath with agitation would possibly do a better job. PB is pretty good, but carb cleaner will actually dissolve corrosion.
 

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The 66 carb is different than the 68 in that the early carb is an SCV carb and 68 went to non SCV. (Spark Control Valve) That aside, my fears are the throttle shaft may be corroded enough to leak once you do/if get it freed up.
 

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Yes, that is an Autolite 1100 SCV carb designed for a manual transmission and Load-o-Matic distributor. While it wiil work with a 68 style distributor, which has centrifical and vacuum advance, it does not supply ported vacuum for your 68 vacuum advance. You would need to plug off the vacuum port and use full manifold vacuum to your distributor. The automatic version of that carb has a dashpot on pass side opposite of the accelerator pump on drivers side. Not saying it can't be salvaged, but it's pretty rough and don't know what it looks like inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thank you very much for the info.

Well after being in the bath for about 24hrs it cleaned up pretty well except for the inside of the closed throttle plate as you can see in the picture. I'm guessing it probably had water pooled up inside the carb for many years sitting on the car before I got it.

So would the distributor work ok running off manifold vacuum only if block off the port on the distributor?

If I can't get the shaft freed up or its corroded to the point it leaks, do you know of a good source to get a reasonably priced rebuildable, 1968 correct carb?

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I soaked it in the chem dip for a 4 days straight. When I took it out and rinsed and brushed it it looked like brand new but the throttle shaft still would not budge. I ended up cutting the center of the throttle shaft out and knocking each half into the bore of the carb with a hammer and punch. I think if I can get a new shaft and throttle blade I can get this carb back up and running.

Does anyone know where I can get parts like that?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I got the carburetor all reassembled with the rebuild kit, now I just need the throttle shaft and blade. I found a similar one for sale at carburetorparts.com but the blade was the wrong diameter. Does anyone know where I could find the throttle shaft and blade? throttle blade diameter is 1.43" or 1-7/16".

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I ended up getting a good parts carburetor from a member here (thanks RagHead!). Using the throttle shaft and blade from the parts carb and a few other odds and ends I got my carb fully assembled it seems like all the linkages are moving properly. Now I just need to get the engine cleaned up and bolt it on.

Thanks for all the help.
 
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