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I recently purchased a 1968 Mustang Coupe with a 289 4 speed Manual transmission. When I bought it it would start up fine and ran great until I let it run out of oil. This being my first classic car I did not watch the oil levels close enough until I happened to blow my oil pump. Luckily I parked my car soon enough so as to not damage the engine (so said my mechanic). I got a new oil pump, oil pump driveshaft and oil filter put in and the car seemed to be back to its original state. However I have recently had trouble starting the car and have begun to hear what seems to be the same knocking noise from the passenger side of the car that I heard before the oil pump blew.

While the car has always needed some incentive to start in the mornings it would usually start instantly the rest of the day. However now I find that I need to pump the gas pedal every time and rev the engine if I want to start the car. I am blowing smoke out the back and I also smell gas or oil in the air when I do this.

The knocking noise worries me because it is exactly the same sound I heard before when I blew my oil pump. The thing is that now I am checking my oil every time I gas up and sometimes in between. I just checked it today and the oil line is at full on my dipstick.

Is it possible that this knocking noise is a completely different issue or is my oil pump or distributer damaged? Also are these issues related? What could be causing my difficulties in starting the car and how can I make it so I do not have to hold the gas pedal down to start my car every time?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Your starting trouble is just a matter of choke adjustment. Keep in mind that this is not fuel injection; carbureted cars don't like it if you try to just turn the key and go after sitting all night.

The knock is another matter; it could be any number of things. If it goes away after running for a few seconds, it may just be a lifter that bleeds down and taps until your oil pressure is up. (My '72 has one - it hasn't gotten any worse in ten years.) If it's constant, it is likely more serious, and hopefully some of the more experienced engine experts here can help you out.
 
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