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I have a 1971 Ford Mustang Coupe with an original 289 v8.
Those are some of the only things i know about it it was given to me when i turned 15.
I'm 16 now and i need some advice/help.
I want to make my engine better, as in faster of course.
I fully understand the fact that I'm young i don't need a fast car but, me and my father both want it to be faster.
I have done my homework and I have the idea to "stroke it out"
so my question is what stroker kit should i buy for my car?
 

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I'd focus on getting it looking and running perfect first. You can do a lot with a better carburetor, intake, exhaust, electronic ignition, etc. If you end up wanting more displacement later on many of the parts bolt-onto a 302 or 351W block, and you can let a possible block swap guide your purchasing decisions.

The 221, 260, 289, 302, and 351W are all the same basic design and make up the Ford small block family. The 289 was available in a HP version and as I recall the 302 and 351W were both available as Boss versions.
 

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Understanding that you lack knowledge is the first step to knowledge. Nothing turns us older folk off like a kid who thinks they know everything.

That said, you are beginning a journey that can be very rewarding, especially if you can share the experience with your Dad.

My suggestion is not to increase the power/speed until you have a car that can handle said power/speed. For example, the brakes/steering/suspension are 40 years old. The first steps you need to take are not the "fun" steps, but those that will ensure you don't wreck the car.

Careful scrutiny of the aforementioned parts is essential to determining if the car is capable of handling the power increase you seek.

Your brakes should be up to par with whatever increase in power you decide on.

With the safety lecture out of the way, there are MANY companies who sell stroker kits. Remember the difference between a 289 and a 302 is a factory stroker kit.

There are pros and cons to machining your own block to accept a stroker kit versus buying a short block with a kit already installed. I'd recommend the new short block route and transferring the parts from your current engine to the new short block. Then in a year or two, you can replace the heads (which will be very restrictive) with something befitting your larger displacement.

Don't try to do everything at once. If you string out your mods, not only will you be able to use knowledge gained from previous modifications, but you'll get to actually DRIVE the car in the meantime. Remember the point of all of this is to enjoy the car. If it is on blocks for three years while you save up for parts, you'll lose interest. Sound's like experience talking, huh?

It sounds like you have the proper attitude to learn all there is to learn about your Mustang. Enjoy the process.
 

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If it is a 289, it is not the original engine; more likely it is a 302. I believe '68 was the last year you could get a 289. The only difference is about 1/8" longer stroke, as the block is the same.
 

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Joes72/65 is right about the 289. Wikipedia quote: "In 1968 the four-barrel 225 hp (168 kW) engine was dropped, leaving the two-barrel — now reduced back to 195 hp (145 kW) — and the HiPo. 1968 was the last year of production for the 289."

The only way to really know if your engine is a 289 or 302 is to check the date codes stamped on the block. One is stamped onto the top of the block under the intake manifold, it will say 289 or 302. The other is on the bottom side of the block, on the passenger side, right between the oil pan and starter. Its much easier to see this with the pan off. This number is a date code.. write down the numbers and then Google "ford block casting numbers".. should be the first site.. use this to decode the number

you could just pop off a valve cover and see if the head says 289 or 302, but these could have been replaced/removed, etc. at some previous time.

and i agree with MustangBradley's post about safety... you need to check out the suspension. any rusty parts needs to be replaced.. new shocks/springs... if the orignal control arms are okay they may just need new ball joints. new disc brakes up front are always a good thing
 
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