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Ok I hit a small pot hole the other day. When I got up to the stop light, I heard a noise on the passenger side and felt a vibration in my brake.
I noticed that I did not hear anything or feel any vibration under 20 miles an hour, only when slowing down from 30 or above miles an hour.
I jacked up the car had my son start it up, put it in gear and rev it up to 40 50 miles an hour and then slowly push the brake. I did not hear anything while laying under the car. Son said he felt the brake vibrate.
I put new rotors and brake pads on both sides but sill hear the noise and feel the brake.
Ok now what I did was with the front wheels off the ground, car in drive, the left wheel tuns really really fast but the right side wheel does not turn any wheres close to the left wheel. It was turning real slow, even stopped turning at one point.
So I m thinking when I hit the pothole, I bent the CV joint. I I was only driving 25 30 mile an hour when I hit the hole, but it hit really hard. Can anyone tell me for sure what I may have did by hitting the pot hole? e mail me with any answers [email protected]
 

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Im saying wheel bearing. Does it pop or anything when you turn the wheel? I bet if you measure between the A arm and another static point they are different side to side, which would also be frame damage.

Only reason I know this, is on my Volvo last winter I hit a curb at low speed, however was braking at the time and it drove the side I hit (passengers) back about half an inch and ruined the wheel bearing on the opposet side.
 

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the whining definitely makes it sound like a wheel bearing
 

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Any chance that a sticky caliper is causing one of the wheels to turn slower when raised in the air? and may have already heat-warped the rotor too, leading to the vibration in the brake pedal?
 

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The term "warped brake disc" has been in common use in motor racing for decades. When a driver reports a vibration under hard braking, inexperienced crews, after checking for (and not finding) cracks often attribute the vibration to "warped discs". They then measure the disc thickness in various places, find significant variation and the diagnosis is cast in stone.

When disc brakes for high performance cars arrived on the scene we began to hear of "warped brake discs" on road going cars, with the same analyses and diagnoses. Typically, the discs are resurfaced to cure the problem and, equally typically, after a relatively short time the roughness or vibration comes back. Brake roughness has caused a significant number of cars to be bought back by their manufacturers under the "lemon laws". This has been going on for decades now - and, like most things that we have cast in stone, the diagnoses are wrong.

With one qualifier, presuming that the hub and wheel flange are flat and in good condition and that the wheel bolts or hat mounting hardware is in good condition, installed correctly and tightened uniformly and in the correct order to the recommended torque specification, in more than 40 years of professional racing, including the Shelby/Ford GT 40s – one of the most intense brake development program in history - I have never seen a warped brake disc. I have seen lots of cracked discs, discs that had turned into shallow cones at operating temperature because they were mounted rigidly to their attachment bells or top hats, a few where the friction surface had collapsed in the area between straight radial interior vanes, and an untold number of discs with pad material unevenly deposited on the friction surfaces - sometimes visible and more often not.

In fact every case of "warped brake disc" that I have investigated, whether on a racing car or a street car, has turned out to be friction pad material transferred unevenly to the surface of the disc. This uneven deposition results in thickness variation (TV) or run-out due to hot spotting that occurred at elevated temperatures.
 

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Friggin sweet write up. Whenever I've had a "warped disc" I have just removed the excess on the disc and replaced the pads and back to normal. I worked at a brake factory for a year and a half and they taught us just what you said. No one has ever believed me when I've told them this. Good to see it in writing.
 
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