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I have been using 87 Octane gas as per manual but have started to get a ping under load when shifting into 2nd and 3rd. Any thoughts on using higher octane gas? Dealership says this is minor and can't be fixed?
 

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I would return it to the dealer and demand that they check the knock sensors and O2 sensors with the hand held scanner that Ford has. This test must be done under load while driving on the road. The Ford Tech can down load the readings while driving and review them after coming back.

If the dealer says that everything is ok have them write that on your RO (Repair Order) recipt and keep it for future action. If the pinging gets worse then again take it back to the dealer to be checked and the work recorded on a RO. This will be your proof that you had the car looked at if you have a future major engine issue.

The engine is required to run on 87 octane as stated in the owners manual. If the dealer says that you have to run a higher grade that is BULLS##T and the dealer knows it. I run a fleet of over 30 Police Interceptors from model year 2001 to 2005 and not one of them pings and they all use the same 87 octane fuel. The only units that I have that run 91 are the BMW and HD motorcycles.

I am so tired of the dealers blowing off the customers that complain of engine knock.

:mad:
 

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try a different station's 87 octane like chevron or something. also if you hear pinging only briefly when you give throttle, that's pretty normal and the knock sensor is doing it's job in that case.
 

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CITYDAVE how do you really feel...
 

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I've noticed that my GT is knocking under load also. I tried using a higher octaine and it went away. However, on page 215 of the owners manual it says "Do not be concerned if your engine sometimes knocks lightly". Guess I'll go back to 87 octaine.
 

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The cost of regular = 96 cents/litre...the cost of midgrade = 101/cents litre....the cost of being able to stomp on it worry free of pinging = priceless:winks
 

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I just received my 2006 mustang GT. It is the replacement for my 2005 mustang GT that I thought I should be able to run 87 octane in because the manual told me so. My engine was damaged by spark knocking from using the recommended 87 octane BP fuel. Ford tried to convince me that the 1/4 to 1/2 second soark knock on upshifts when at normal operating temp was perfectly normal, but when they borscoped the cylinders at a mere 7500 miles, what they saw prompted them to give, yes, give me a brand new car. The cost to me was only the difference in MSRP's between the 2005 and 2006. (95 bucks in my case, I had 14000 miles on the 2005 that they bought back) There are many many improvements in my 2006 model, (clutch, shorter shifter throws, infinitely better seats, the dash rattle thing seems to be worked out, and many other little stupid things like that crazy little weak magnetic thing that is supposed to alter the position of your safety belt that is now a powerful snap which actually works). The car now has about 1200 miles on it. Unfortunately, it also spark knocks on that 87 BP fuel. It's not just BP either. I tried shell, lukoil, and others. It does not matter. The Ford engineers who decided to replace my car would never admit that I could run higher octane, but did tell me that I would not void my warranty if I used it. Run what you will, but I have lived through the horrors of the mustang GT and 87 octane. Car is holding it's own on 89 for now. I will move to 93 if we have a hot summer and the knocking becomes a problem like it was in my 2005 in the hot weather. Good luck. . .
 

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One other thing about my above posting. Ford tried to fix this alleged normal condition numerous times. Knock sensors were replaced, processor reflashed, top end cleaner was injected into the cylinders and left overnight to clear what they described as excessive carbon buildup. The car was road tested extensively with all of the bells and whistles hooked up to it. If this is a normal condition, why have I not ever heard it in any other car, and why would Ford have invested so much time and effort on attemps to fix it? It knocks on upshifts, acceleration at highway cruising speeds, and most annoyingly on straight line acceleration at higher RPM's. All of this behavior has been noted in my 2005, which was built in June 2005, and my 2006, which was built in April 2006. Both were/are bone stock by the way. Call high test fuel a waste of money if you must, but tearing apart the soft components in the top half of your engine does not sound like a very good alternative. Good luck. . .
 

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CityDave said:
I would return it to the dealer and demand that they check the knock sensors and O2 sensors with the hand held scanner that Ford has. This test must be done under load while driving on the road. The Ford Tech can down load the readings while driving and review them after coming back.

If the dealer says that everything is ok have them write that on your RO (Repair Order) recipt and keep it for future action. If the pinging gets worse then again take it back to the dealer to be checked and the work recorded on a RO. This will be your proof that you had the car looked at if you have a future major engine issue.

The engine is required to run on 87 octane as stated in the owners manual. If the dealer says that you have to run a higher grade that is BULLS##T and the dealer knows it. I run a fleet of over 30 Police Interceptors from model year 2001 to 2005 and not one of them pings and they all use the same 87 octane fuel. The only units that I have that run 91 are the BMW and HD motorcycles.

I am so tired of the dealers blowing off the customers that complain of engine knock.

:mad:
I agree they should check it out...but I wouldn't "demand" anything.:winks
 

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Extensive tests with different octane levels of the following:
BP
Shell
Lukoil
Gulf
I have heard great things about Shell, and horrible things about Gulf. I could not tell the difference. The car performed well on both. It spark knocks just as bad on Shell 87 as it does on Gulf 87. The same was noted for the others. I was/am able to get away with all brands of 89 octane in sub 80 degree temps. That is to say that the car knocks less frequently. Probably what Ford means when they say not to be concerned if the car sometimes knocks lightly. All brands did not knock at all on 93 octane under normal driving conditions in any weather. Ford told me there was a nationwide problem with octane levels and to run 89 octane in my mustang, but that was shouted down as a mistake during my meetings with the engineers. Fords stand is that you should not ever run anything more than 87 octane in the mustang GT. Cited carbon buildup as the problem with higher octane. Do you know how they test knock sensors? They replicate the knocking sound by taking a hammer and chisel and banging on the manifold while monitoring the timing. So, whenever you hear that knocking sound, think about that hammer and chisel and ask yourself how long you think your engine will last? I guess I played around with 87 octane too long. And many thanks to Ford for giving me a second chance. Good luck. . .
 

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BP is Amoco. Thats all I use now. The silver (89) is working for me. I think Mobil and Lukoil use the same fuel, but am not sure. I was not able to tell the difference in any of the brands. The car (my old 2005) ran great on all of them. It just pings away like there is no tomorrow on the 87 octane level of each and every one of them (in the warmer weather). Perhaps Ford did their testing and tuning in Alaska.
 

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zman99 said:
BP is Amoco. Thats all I use now. The silver (89) is working for me. I think Mobil and Lukoil use the same fuel, but am not sure. I was not able to tell the difference in any of the brands. The car (my old 2005) ran great on all of them. It just pings away like there is no tomorrow on the 87 octane level of each and every one of them (in the warmer weather). Perhaps Ford did their testing and tuning in Alaska.
Not true, totally seperate fuel blends- Mobil is much more superior to Lukoil (Getty). Quality control is also better. (ie: dedicated transporters and independant third party testing)
 

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This is a recurring topic, of which several threads have been created in the past (one by myself). I got the same treatment from my dealer when I took my '05 in about 6 months ago. Did the test drive, put it on the scanner, and reported that all parameters were within spec. They then made me a copy of the page of the manual stating how light pinging is normal, and will not hurt the engine. Maybe not, but like you, I feel better not hearing it. So, for a mere $.20 per gallon, I use 93 octane and don't hear the rattle anymore. I prefer Chevron, but that's just me.

Others have reported that a custom tune by an aftermarket tuner has eliminated this problem. Could be, but I'm not going to go that route before my warranty is up. So, in my humble opinion, I'd just use premium and sleep well. I think the whole idea of recommending 87 octane is a selling point. Some folks would be scared away by them recommending premium. Of course, we all would like to save money on gas, but why risk engine damage for a mere $3 or so per fill up? To me, this is the same logic as people who try to skimp on oil, thinking they're smart because they saved 5 bucks on an oil change, using some store brand oil of unknown quality...
 

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HazMatLadder26 said:
Not true, totally seperate fuel blends- Mobil is much more superior to Lukoil (Getty). Quality control is also better. (ie: dedicated transporters and independant third party testing)
I don't know about other states, but in California there is absolutely no difference in octane, the sole determinant of knock resistance, frome brand to another. All gasoline comes from the same tanks at the distribution center. The only difference is in the detegent packages that are added when the fuel is pumped into the storage tanks at the gas station.
 

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Thanks for the tip on Lukoil. Unfortunately, all of my area Mobils were converted to Lukoils, so now I use BP. Ford can't give me any crap about using BP because my new car has "Ford recommends BP" stamped on the gascap. Oh, by the way, I can actually fill the tank in this one without the pump shutting off repeatedly. I agree with rainman. You just gotta stop that knocking at all costs. I learned the hard way. Perhaps this car IS a 93 octane tune out of the box.
 

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chevron is one of the very few that process oil into gas from ground to pump...I always use chevron...rotten robbies etc. is trash fuel with many impurities and in the end, you get what you pay for....I don't mind paying a few cents extra per gallon for a processed fuel from ground to pump...
 
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