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Discussion Starter #1
So sure this is a pretty easy install.......however I have a question.

All of the instructions I see indicate to remove the bolts using a 18mm socket. That being said - the nut is 21mm.

Historically, I remove the nut first to remove a bolt. I see the nut is designed to hold isetself tight so you don't need the 21mm wrench to hold it.

So what's the deal here - just remove the bolt?
 

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I would like to know the answer to this question, too. My uncles/fiance tried to remove my stock LCA's to install BMR LCA's and my stock ones would not come off. I'm going to have to take it to a shop to have them installed. :so
 

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Remove the bolt and the nut stays in place! I just had to replace mine about 3-4 months ago because my tie rod ends were bad on both sides.

They are hard to get in and out due to the weird design of them.
 

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If you need more documentation, let me know- I have a ford service manual that I can scan in a few pages on the LCA's.
 

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I just did my LCAs this past weekend, so it's still fresh in my mind. Yep, the bolts are 18mm, and the nuts have the tab welded on the back so you don't have to hold them.

Here's a brain dump of the process I followed:

You'll want to put the rear axle up on jack stands and pull the wheels.

With the e-brake off, pop the little spring steel clip off the e-brake assembly, and unhook the cable, and thread it through the stock LCA.

Then, for one side, pull the 18mm bolts out, and take out the stock LCA. Do them one at a time, or else the axle may shift.

Grease the bushings as specified in the instructions, and put the LCAs into place. Mine also had a front/back and left/right orientation, so make sure you get that right.

I have a rubber hammer that I used to get them settled, and get the holes lined up. Insert the bolts but don't torque them down very much. I also used the rubber hammer to tap the bolts through.

When both LCAs are in, but not torqued down, put the wheels back on, drop the car, and put the back up on ramps. I used Loc-tite on the bolts as well. Then, torque the bolts down to 129 ft-lb. You want to torque to spec while they're sitting at the stock ride height, hence the wheels sitting on the ramps. Just a fore-warning, there's not much of an arc to turn the torque wrench on the front (frame) bolts, so it takes awhile.

There's also something in the shop manual about a method of marking the rear shock sleeve height, but I didn't feel like messing with that.

A lift would make it really easy, but it's doable on jackstands and ramps. Have fun!

I would like to know the answer to this question, too. My uncles/fiance tried to remove my stock LCA's to install BMR LCA's and my stock ones would not come off. I'm going to have to take it to a shop to have them installed. :so
Ouch... I don't remember mine "falling" out, but I didn't have to put much pressure on it. With both bolts and e-brake cable out, I'm assuming they tried tapping it with a hammer or something, right?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info. It was really removing the bold rather than the nut that concerned me. Cheers.
 

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i change mines like 2 weeks ago, i just remove the bolt and that was it. by the way in what they help you this friday ima take it to the track see if they help me on my 60ft.
 

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Just a little FYI on bolts and Loc-tite:

Most of the Ford bolts are one time use because they add a little patch of "loc-tite" to the bolts. This amount was determined using a controlled test environment so that Ford could have a high confidence level that the applied torque produces the correct preload in the bolt.

Using too much Loc-tite increases the preload obtained for a specified torque.

That being said, I use Loc-tite; it makes me feel safer. Just don't over do it or you will have bolts that are not preloaded enough even though you applied the correct torque.
 

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Just a little FYI on bolts and Loc-tite:

Most of the Ford bolts are one time use because they add a little patch of "loc-tite" to the bolts. This amount was determined using a controlled test environment so that Ford could have a high confidence level that the applied torque produces the correct preload in the bolt.

Using too much Loc-tite increases the preload obtained for a specified torque.

That being said, I use Loc-tite; it makes me feel safer. Just don't over do it or you will have bolts that are not preloaded enough even though you applied the correct torque.
Those bolts are also torque-to-yield so they're designed for single use because they actually stretch.
 

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Those bolts are also torque-to-yield so they're designed for single use because they actually stretch.
I was just about to disagree, but then I did some math and the torque specs in the manual actually do come out pretty close to theoretical torque to yield a M12x1.75 fastener. Learn something new everyday

The point of my previous post is even more important now ...

If you over do it on the Loc-tite, you reduce the friction between the bolt and nut thus resulting in more preload for a applied torque.
 
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