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Discussion Starter #1
Needs some advice folks.

I've got my engine in the machine shop right now and just got off the phone with them. They tore into my 289 and in the words of the machinist, "The heads are mush." So I'm going to need to replace the heads and all associated parts. He can get me a set of remans for $345/head assembled. I'm looking around and I can get some Edelbrocks for about $500/head assembled. I'm on a budget and I'm not trying to trick my ride out for performance or anything. Just going for a fun daily driver. Will going with the remans be a good deal or will I regret it?

I should also add that he tore into it and discovered that it had been rebuilt before and bored to "40" as he put it. I'm not totally familiar with engine terminology but I'm assuming that means 0.040 over original bore? He said that it needs rebored because it's beyond polishing so he is going to have to bore it to "60," which again I'm assuming is 0.060 over original bore? He's going to bore the rod bearings to "20" and the mains to "10." Is this sounding like an ok setup or am I going to wish I had just bought a new engine? Obviously money IS an issue because having to buy heads is already putting me over budget.

The total rebuild is going to end up costing me probably just over $2k and that includes a master rebuild kit but reconditioning of a lot of parts that are still in good condition. I originally was hoping not to go over $1400, but the heads have thrown me over.

Thoughts? Will the reman heads be ok? Is boring it to what he said a bad idea? Need to know soon because he's going to start ordering parts after the weekend.

*Side note I'm installing a new 180 degree thermostat, all new hosing, and a new 2 row aluminum radiator. I've heard that boring that much can have heat issues, so just want to clarify this info in case that comes up in discussion. NO A/C no power steering. Base model.
 
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If it needs to be bored .060" over, I would probably junk it and start with another engine. Unless you're wanting it to be absolutely original for resale value, any 289 or 302 will drop right in, though you will need to replace the harmonic balancer and either your flexplate or flywheel if you go with a 1982 or newer 302.

You "can" bore a 289 or 302 over .060", but it will run much hotter and the block will need to be sonic checked to see if it can even handle it. Both of the 302s I've run that were bored .040" ran MUCH hotter. In my '87 Mustang GT I was able to upgrade the cooling system to compensate enough to get by except on the hottest days in bad traffic. In my '76 Mustang II nothing seemed to help, it'd run a constant 220 on a good day and boil over if it wasn't a good day.

As far as the heads go, rebuilds will be fine as long as they're done properly. I've seen some "rebuilt" heads that were a little less than kosher come out of some of these mass rebuilders over the years though.
 

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from everything I read, and with experience, I suggest pulling out of a junkyard a 5.0 motor, or buying a 302.

Some can be had from pan to intake for 200$, with a mild rebuild suggested, others a short/long block for 100.

The 302 if its a late model will be able to use a roller cam/lifters, longer bore skirts for pistons and ofcourse the more cubic inches, + with all your old accessories keep the 302 looking like the 289 was still in there, only way to find out would be to start pulling numbers or parts off.

I think that would be cheaper way to go, and more dependable.

Go with a rebuilt 302.
 
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How well do you know this machine shop? It sounds a little funky right now. Did they tell you how much wear you have on your cylinders? And what do they mean by saying your heads are "mush"? Unless you have some bad cracks, your heads should be rebuildable. Bruce
 

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I don't understand the mush either, if the valve guides are too worn, they can be knurled or replaced, valves can be replaced, the seats can be replaced (in fact the exhausts should have hardended seats installed so you can run unleaded, this may mean new exhaust valves also, valve springs can be replaced, rocker arm studs can be replaced, the problem is all this costs money to have done, as long as the heads aren't cracked or warped too much, they can be rebuilt. My 2 cts. Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I should probably elaborate on the "mush" comment. The machinist said that the heads are cracked, both of them. They are not salvageable. He can obviously replace the innards - valve guides, seats, rocker arms etc. He said that all of that was beyond repair. He's planning on replacing all of it but the heads are obviously finished.

The machine shop is trustable. A good family friend of mine who has been rebuilding and hotrodding cars since he was a teen (he's in his 70's now) has been on good relations with the shop I'm using for over 20 years. They've been around plenty of engines of all shapes and sizes and are incredibly trusted in town.

Where does a person even go about finding a 302? Everything I've been looking at is way too expensive. Even with needing to replace the heads I can still get the rebuild done for less than $2k. My biggest fear was the .060 over. Am I running that big of a risk?

I don't understand the mush either, if the valve guides are too worn, they can be knurled or replaced, valves can be replaced, the seats can be replaced (in fact the exhausts should have hardended seats installed so you can run unleaded, this may mean new exhaust valves also, valve springs can be replaced, rocker arm studs can be replaced, the problem is all this costs money to have done, as long as the heads aren't cracked or warped too much, they can be rebuilt. My 2 cts. Good Luck.
 

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its a gamble I wouldnt take, like some horror stories, you can put this money into a full rebuild then it will run hot/possible weakening of the walls, and just be a bigger pain in the neck.


To get a 302, I would first start by asking shops if they have any blocks and rotateing assemblies for cheap, or trade, if that is dry then call some junk yards asking about salvaged vehicle motors.

Theres a junk yard near my house I got a 94' 302 motor out of a mustang for 100$, all i had todo was bring the tools and do it myself.

Then last, check criagslist, plenty of people im sure have these engines around waiting for someone to give them new life.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hmm. This is a tough one. Part of me really wants to keep the original engine just because , well, it's the original 1967 engine and I hate to separate it from the car. But to be able to put a 100,000/7 year rebuild for nearly the same price is tempting. It's still an option. I'd probably just be in a few hundred bucks to my machinist at this point for disassembling the engine.

Why would I want to go with the 1985 5.0 instead of a 1968 302 though or even a 1967 289? I'm not sure how I feel about dropping a 5.0 in it. I'm not shooting for super performance as much as I'd like to stick with uniqueness of simply being a 1967 Pony car. Does that make any sense? Am I taking as big of a chance as everyone says by boring to .060 over?

Questions I have to ask myself are what I really want from the car. I know the 302 was a better engine, but the 289 was a unique engine that was discontinued in '67 and that unique aspect is appealing. So at the same time I have to ask, why not buy a rebuilt 289 then? But then there is the originality aspect and just the ability of being able to open my hood and say, "That's the original engine, sweet isn't it?"

This is a tough call. Anyone care to throw in their thoughts? What would you do?

you should have gone with something like this, you would have had your entire stock long block for under 2 grand.

1985 Ford Mustang Engine - V8, 5.0 L, 302 CID; Our Remanufactured Engines Backed By 100,000 Mile / 7-Year Warranty!
 

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if you want to keep a 289, then you can get a 289 long block from the same company as well.

Why a 1985 302 over a 1968? Because 85 and up 302's came from the factory as a roller cam motor, and cams with roller lifters have more power, can run more aggressive profiles, and have less wear on the cam lobes and lifters.

289 and 302 is the same block. Same bore even, just different stroke. You could still badge a 302 as a 289 and nobody would ever be able to tell the difference unless they looked at casting numbers on the block. All the tin from your 289 will still bolt up to it. It's easier to make more power with a 302 than a 289, and that's why I went with a 302 roller instead.

There's no right or wrong decision you will make. If you want to stick with a 289 there's no problem with that, especially if you're not wanting to make a powerplant.

Just throwing it out there though, you can still keep your original 289 if you get a remanufactured engine and then you'll still always have it. Unless you want the original motor to be the block of iron that actually makes your car go. In that case you're pretty much stuck with rebuilding the one you have.

I thought 60 over sounded a little large. Looking through Google there are lots of people out there who have done it and without ill affect. I personally don't have an opinion either way, i'm not experienced enough with boring motors out to have an educated opinion. I would do your research and then make your decision based on everything you find.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So just throwing this out there, but let's say I were to go with te 5.0. I'd be able to pull the oil pan off my 289 and then I'd probably just need to pick up a timing cover. Would everything else essentially be the same?

I'm going to have to think about this. Not to mention I'd have to figure out what to do with my disassembled 289 at the machine shop. I think I'll think about this over the weekend and then call my machinist Tuesday and see what he thinks. I'd probably be looking at $2k either way when it's all said and done. Just comes down to whether I want the original 289 bored over or a "new" 5.0.
 

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You could always have your 289 resleeved back to 4 in.bore. Don't know what that would cost. Late Model Restoration has a budget short block for $699.00 It accepts roller cam and would need a 50 oz. 5.0 balance damper. The short block Part # LRS-6009E. I am sure there are others around at a similar price.
 

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So just throwing this out there, but let's say I were to go with te 5.0. I'd be able to pull the oil pan off my 289 and then I'd probably just need to pick up a timing cover. Would everything else essentially be the same?

I'm going to have to think about this. Not to mention I'd have to figure out what to do with my disassembled 289 at the machine shop. I think I'll think about this over the weekend and then call my machinist Tuesday and see what he thinks. I'd probably be looking at $2k either way when it's all said and done. Just comes down to whether I want the original 289 bored over or a "new" 5.0.
everything that was on your 289 transfers right over. If you were to do that, you'd have to tell them you're using a mechanical fuel pump so they'll put an eccentric on in front of the cam for the fuel pump lever. You'd also tell them you're using a front sump oil pan, and they'll plug the hole at the back of the block. You'd have to get a 50 oz balancer and flex plate for it. I sent them my 28 oz balancer and flexplate. Since I was having them balance the engine as well, they balanced it to my balancer.

You should just ask your machinist the potential pit falls of boring it over that much and get his honest opinion and see what other alternatives are, such as resleeving.

Also, from that same link you can also just get reconditioned heads. You might check into what a set of 289 heads would cost, to see if they're any cheaper than the current quote you have. I'm not trying to talk you into a getting a 302. I'm just letting you know your options and what would be required.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm planning on talking to my machinist first thing Tuesday morning and having a good honest conversation with him. I can't seem to find any heads on that site? I've searched for heads and can't find any for the price my machinist quoted me ($345/head).

everything that was on your 289 transfers right over. If you were to do that, you'd have to tell them you're using a mechanical fuel pump so they'll put an eccentric on in front of the cam for the fuel pump lever. You'd also tell them you're using a front sump oil pan, and they'll plug the hole at the back of the block. You'd have to get a 50 oz balancer and flex plate for it. I sent them my 28 oz balancer and flexplate. Since I was having them balance the engine as well, they balanced it to my balancer.

You should just ask your machinist the potential pit falls of boring it over that much and get his honest opinion and see what other alternatives are, such as resleeving.

Also, from that same link you can also just get reconditioned heads. You might check into what a set of 289 heads would cost, to see if they're any cheaper than the current quote you have. I'm not trying to talk you into a getting a 302. I'm just letting you know your options and what would be required.
 

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they won't have then listed. But if you gave them a call they'd tell you if they had them and how much they would be.

By the way, the company that actually builds the remanufactured engines for that site is S & J engine in Spokane, WA so you could just call them directly. Unfortunately it's an 8.5 hr drive for you so you wouldn't be able to save on shipping.

https://www.sandjengines.com/rebuilt-auto-engines/FORD/MUSTANG

I see they have a 289 for $1260.
 
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You could always have your 289 resleeved back to 4 in.bore. Don't know what that would cost. Late Model Restoration has a budget short block for $699.00 It accepts roller cam and would need a 50 oz. 5.0 balance damper. The short block Part # LRS-6009E. I am sure there are others around at a similar price.
I was thinking the same thing sporty12, but you beat me to it.

Eatplaysleep, I can fully understand you wanting to keep the original block. And that's a good move. Have your machine shop do a thorough sonic test on the cylinders to make sure there is enough material there to accept a .060" overbore. If not then your choices would be to re-ring, have the cylinders sleeved back to standard bore, or use the block as a paper weight in the future eventuality you sold the car to a restorer for a "numbers" project. Bruce
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though you really wouldn't be gaining anything in having a numbers matching 67 coupe.
 

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sleeving one hole to fix it is great! to do all 8 would be crazy. it is 80-100 bucks per cylinder. 800 bucks would go along way toward another engine! just my 2 cents...
 

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You might check out this ebay listing (270606850830) and see what you think. Rebuilt 302 with 36000 mile warranty. 1375.00 including shipping and core deposit
 

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1) didnt the engine run before you took it there IE the heads were not cracked before?

2) I have a set of correct heads for ya if you want to have correct #'s if you can wait till I pull them out of the car in a few weeks you can have em PM me.
 
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