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my rebuilt 289 is ready to do a run in for the first time in a year, it has a spark and fuel the timing is 10 degree tdc ( it is a hi-pro 289 (i think) so 10 is right ...or so iv been told) the distributor is set right. the advance is right on, and when i put my key in and turn it the 289 turns over and starts. ( the fan is spinning fast enough to cut steel so i know it starts) so when i get it going i let go of the key and both the starter AND the engine stop.
and after the whine of the starter stops i try again and the same thing happens. turn key , start, let key go, engine dies,let starter whine and cool down. can anyone tell me what is going on ?
thx all
 

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From your description, the coil may be getting power on crank but not on run. To check, connect a direct feed to the positive side of the coil & see if it will keep running then. Don't leave it running like this though as the coil may overheat.
 

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With the engine off, turn the key to the run position. Check for voltage to the coil at the + terminal from a RED/GREEN STRIPE wire. You should be getting a voltage reading of about 8 volts. The reduced voltage is because there is a resistor wire in the circuit when in the run position. In the start position the resistor wire is bypassed to make starting the engine easier.

Power to the ignition coil in the run position originates from the back of the ign. switch, the RED/GREEN wire. If you trace the wire from the switch, the RED/GREEN will turn into a PINK wire for a few inches, then back to RED/GREEN and on to the coil. The PINK wire is the resistor that drops the voltage and protects the coil. There should be one connector near or at the firewall as the wire progresses to the coil.

Since the engine will run in the start position, this can eliminate a good portion of the circuit including the neutral safety switch, if equipped. I would suspect that there is a break in the resistor wire or there is a problem with the ignition switch itself. The resistor wire gets hot during operation which could lead to its breakage at some point and makes for a good suspect. You just need to find out where the lack of voltage is originating with the RED/GREEN wire.

Don't run the engine with the starter still engaged. You'll be looking for a new starter in no time.
 
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