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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've just got my hands on a 69 351W block. My goal here is to build it to 500hp or so and keep it very streetable. I'm not very familiar with this motor so any and all suggestions would be very helpful.

I don't know if I should keep the motor mild and throw a blower or nitrous on it or what?

I'm planning on boring it 030 over and other than than I really don't know were to start. I would also like to keep the motor carbed.

thanks :)
 

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408W, FTW! oh yeah.

408w Stroker Cobra Replica Engine

thats a 408w putting out 485hp. it has a list of modifications done to it as well.

i think that it should give you a good baseline as to what you would need to do, along the N/A route.
 

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Thats a pretty sweet 408, but wow thats pricey. You could piece together your own package and have a machine shop build it for less. I was thinking about building a 393. 94+ roller 351, 3.85 cast stroker crank, stock truck(football) rods with ARP bolts, forged 302 pistons, Edelbrock Victor Jr, heads and intake. Not 100% sure on which carb or other stuff. I've been doing a bunch of reading on this lately and a stock block block can handle 600-650 horse and a cast crank, truck rods with upgraded bolts will handle close to that as well. I'm shooting for at least 450 horse n/a with room for a shot of juice on top. I don't want to rev it past 6500 rpm and this is for a drag only car.
 

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408 is a good way to go. 500 hp is easy with such a stroker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the input guys. So I've decided I will stroke it to either a 393 or 408.

Now, what kind of h/c/i combo would you guys use? Also, what kind of cfm am I looking for in a carb? And will I need to do any mods to the heads, pistons, etc.? Remember I'm trying to keep this car streetable as much as possible.

Also (a little side note) the block is a 1986 and its a little worse for wear. I want it basically back to new, so what do I ask the machine shop to do? And what should I expect to pay?

Thanks guys:bigthumbsup
 

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der. stroke it...but i would also make it a roller motor!
 

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500hp is a good goal. With a stroker, it's obtainable, but you'll have to work at it a little. Not much, just a little.

You defiantly need more cubes. The 408 is probably the best choice. If you're considering a power adder, or high rpm's on a road course, use forged parts. If not, cast parts will last forever and are reasonably priced.

You'll need big heads to move that much air. I'm using Dart Pro-1, but Edelbrocks are also good.

You'll want to use a good cam. Think big. Think roller. I'm using the largest retrofit roller Coast High has to offer; lots of lift and duration. That, of course, bleeds off cylinder pressures. So you'll want a somewhat high static compression ratio.

What do you plan on using for induction? There's no stock type intake/EFI system that's going to feed a monster like this.

Same thing with the rest of the fuel system. You'll need to upgrade to bigger pumps and lines to keep up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm planning on carbing the engine.

And what do you mean by static compression? I've never heard this term before.

And with the 408 kit, do the cylinders need to be bored 30 over or what?

Thanks again
 

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Static compression (AKA: Compression ratio) is a simple calculation of how much the air:gas mixture is squeezed in the cylinder. 9.8, 10.2, etc.

Not to be confused with Effective Cylinder Pressure (AKA: Cold Cranking Pressure). This is an actual measurement of the pressure in the cylinder. You can measure it with a compression gauge. It takes in to account bore, stroke, rod length, etc. But mostly it's a factor of air pressure (ambient or forced), static compression, and intake valve closing.

On a big cam, the intake valve may be open for 290-300*. If you look at a cam card, you'll find the intake valve closing point. That point is somewhere around 30-45* ABDC. That means the intake valve is open while the piston is rising in the cylinder. That bleeds off effective cylinder pressures at lower rpm's. To compensate for that, you raise the static compression.

ECP should be around 180-190psi or so for good street manners on pump gas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So then I would just raise the static compression with a bigger carb (800 cfm?) and a 190 or so fuel pump?
 

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So then I would just raise the static compression with a bigger carb (800 cfm?) and a 190 or so fuel pump?

No, no, no. I'm sorry, but I didn't explain that well.

Static compression is how much the air:fuel mixture gets squeezed inside the cylinder. It has nothing to do with the intake or the carb.

The Static Compression RATIO is defined as the Volume of the Combustion Chamber when the piston is at the very bottom of it's travel (called "bottom dead center" or BDC) DIVIDED BY the Volume of the Combustion Chamber when the piston is at the very top of it's travel (called "top dead center" or TDC).

Compression Ratio Explained (Static & Dynamic) - Team Integra
 
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