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Discussion Starter #1
Hey Guys:

So i finally got my 1990 5.0 T5 parts car, anyhow i find at high rpm shifts into second, it doesnt feel like it grabs the gear all that well, and also when driving in all forward gears, then stop and put it in reverse it sometimes grinds into gear? I believe there is a clutch problem. Ive also got a recept for the transmission being rebuilt in 2005 with new gears and brand new syncors. So i dont think it is something inside the trans...

Any suggestions?
 

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yeah. a cheap re-build. most mechanic shop are based on quantity, not quality. its hard to find a good transmission shop that will not screw you over. but my t-5 in my 4-banger car always grinds into reverse since day 1 that i had it. plus it has a bad 2nd syncro and it was rebuilt no more than 3 years ago either. i always have to put the thing in a forward gear and then into reverse to avoid grinding the guts out of it...but my tremec hasnt given me any trouble in my gt, but that was a 2000 dollar trans so what do ya expect..adjust your clutch cable at the quadrant if you have one...i never have had an adjustable quadrant so i would know where to start..
 

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The clutch could probably use an adjustment, and reverse has no synchros to grind.
 

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The T-5 does not have a synchronized (or cobstant engaged) reverse gear. I don't know if that is the exact description, but here is the practical side of things. When you shift into reverse in a T-5 the input shaft will need to come to a complete hault until you can get into geat without any "grinding". So this in by itself does not say that thre is any problem with your transmission or clutch. Now if you have a problem with grinding after a complete stop and you have pressed in on the clutch long enough for the transmisssion input shaft quit rotating.. i.e. you still ahve a solid / continuous grind, then the clutch is out of either adjustment or is going bad. This could also account for not "getting into gear" all the way. Hope this helps.
 

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The clutch could probably use an adjustment, and reverse has no synchros to grind.

+1 I agree with Eagle about the clutch possibly needing adjustment. Also, as he said, the T5 does not have a syncronizer for reverse so unless you put it in a forward gear first and then pull it back to reverse, you are going to get grinding. I usually go into 5th and then pull back to reverse and this way, it doesn't grind.
As far as it not fully engaging the 2nd gear at high rpm, what rpm are you trying to shift at? Are you using shift stops on the shifter? Does it pop out of gear and end up back in nuetral?

When adjusting the clutch on a '90, all you can do is pull the pedal all the way as far as you can and then push it to the floor. Repeat as necessary until you hear it click. This will bring the bearing closer to the fingers of the pressure plate.
General rule of thumb is you need 1/4" gap between the face of the bearing and the fingers of the pressure plate with the pedal at the rest position. You can remove the clitch fork cover from the side of the bell housing and look inside to determine how much gap you have. If it looks like the gap is greater than 1/4", then adjust on the pedal until you get it down to that measurement. Another thing to check is air gap. Air gap is simply the amount of gap between the clutch disc and the flywheel surface when the pedal is pushed down on the floor. Obviously you'll need a buddy to help with this unless you have really long arms.:hihi: Basically, get a .030" feeler guage and if you get into the bottom of the bell housing(you may have to remove the starter shim plate temporarily), have your buddy push the clutch pedal to the floor and hold it. Take the .030" feeler gauge and see if you can slide it up between the disc and either the flywheel surface or the pressure plate surface. The feeler gauge should feel like it does when you gap your spark plugs, not slide in loosely but not have to jam it in there either. Should be nice and snug when you slide the gauge up in there. A diaphram style pressure plate like you have requires an air gap of .030-.060. We like to set them on the low side that way once the disc starts to wear from useage, it won't wear beyond the air gap range. If you don't have .030" gap, then re-adjust your clutch some more and re-check until you do. Remember, to reduce the air gap down, you need to back the bearing away from the fingers. In other words, if you have .070" air gap, that's too much and you need to reduce that. You'll need to adjust the throw out bearing away from the fingers to reduce the air gap.

Hopefully that didn't confuse. Let me know if I can be any more help.:bigthumbsup


Richard
Tech Support
Tremec TKO, T45 & T56 Transmission Systems
 

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Discussion Starter #6
hey guys, i also noice i whining noice, from the clutch only when your letting it out, now i believe thats the throw out bearing, and the clutch seems really heavy when pushing it in. What would cause that?
 

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Your due up for a new clutch. Usually the fingers on the plate cause these problems.
 

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hey guys, i also noice i whining noice, from the clutch only when your letting it out, now i believe thats the throw out bearing, and the clutch seems really heavy when pushing it in. What would cause that?

A whining noise that occurs when you push the clutch pedal down is signs of a bad throw out bearing. A whining noise that occurs in the clutch area when NOT pushing the clutch pedal usually points to the pilot bearing.

The throw out bearing only spins when you push the clutch pedal down, therefore, when you depress the pedal and the face of the bearing contacts the fingers and starts spinning, if it's bad, it'll whine.

The pilot bearing on the other hand, is turning constantly when the motor is running and is more likely to make a whining noise at this time. The exception to that is when you push the pedal down, it causes the inner bearing part of the pilot to turn at a different speed than the outer case of it(which is in contact with the walls of the crank.

In either case, when replacing a clutch, it is always a good idea to replace both the pilot bearing and the throw out. :bigthumbsup


Richard
Tech Support
Tremec TKO, T45 & T56 Transmission Systems
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hey, guys so i looked at the receipt and the clutch has 90,000 km's on it!!!!!!! i couldnt believe it, no wonder im having issues
 
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