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Discussion Starter #1
I recently got my car back from paint. When I got it back it wasnt running well anymore and was difficult to get it to start. We went ahead and swapped out the points distributor for a duraspark distributor after this the car was running better then ever for about a week or two. So when I tried to turn the car on I had no crank nothing just a click at the ignition box. We ran a couple test and decided it was the starter solenoid. I went and bought a new one from O'reillys. When I went to turn the car on i had to hold the key in the start position for about 5 seconds till it started cranking over. When it did crank it would not stop. The solenoid was stuck. I went to return it and bought one from Mustang Country in Paramount, CA. I installed it and the car turned on fine. It turned on right away and the solenoid didnt get stuck. I turned the car off and on and again it turned on fine. After this time the same thing started happening. The solenoid kept getting stuck. We decided to take out the pink resistor cable. After that the car turned on perfect. Now I cant get the car to start. Not even by jumping the solenoid. I need help im out of ideas and have no idea what to do next.
 
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Based upon what you have described, I do not think your starter solenoids were all bad. I think it is your ignition switch getting "stuck" in the start position. To disprove this, monitor the voltage at the 'S' pin on your relay. It should go to about +8v to 10v(depending upon your battery) while you are cranking and then to 0v when you let off the key to the 'run' position. Sometimes relay contacts will weld together, especially when they get old and worn but again, I do not think this is your problem. A simple tap of the relay will often unstick the contacts. If you have a voltage on the 'S' pin when the key is in the run position, the ignition switch is shorted internally somehow(or a wire is touching a wrong terminal). I know this situation is intermittent so you will have to catch it in the act.

I am not sure why you removed the pink wire? That is your ballast resistor and needed to feed the ignition coil when running. Without it, the engine will turn over and try to start but will stall out when you let off the key to the run position. So put the pink wire back. It is not the main problem...well it is now.:smilie
 

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Based upon what you have described, I do not think your starter solenoids were all bad. I think it is your ignition switch getting "stuck" in the start position. To disprove this, monitor the voltage at the 'S' pin on your relay. It should go to about +8v to 10v(depending upon your battery) while you are cranking and then to 0v when you let off the key to the 'run' position. Sometimes relay contacts will weld together, especially when they get old and worn but again, I do not think this is your problem. A simple tap of the relay will often unstick the contacts. If you have a voltage on the 'S' pin when the key is in the run position, the ignition switch is shorted internally somehow(or a wire is touching a wrong terminal). I know this situation is intermittent so you will have to catch it in the act.

I am not sure why you removed the pink wire? That is your ballast resistor and needed to feed the ignition coil when running. Without it, the engine will turn over and try to start but will stall out when you let off the key to the run position. So put the pink wire back. It is not the main problem...well it is now.:smilie
I thought you were suppose to remove the "pink" wire if you get pertronix electronic ignition. I got the pertronix but never found the pink wire to remove.

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I agree with the ignition switch. Mine just quit working while the engine was running. It is an easy fix and under $20.
 

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The pink wire is under the dash. It runs from the ignition switch to the plug on the firewall. It has a heavy insulation on it.
 

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If your car ran fine before, leave the pink wire. I have the pentronix and the pink wire is fine. You can check it by checking the voltage at the coil with the key in run it should be 10v or higher.

I also think the problem is with your ignition switch.
 
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I would like to amend my previous suggestion to measure the voltage at the 'S' pin (closest to the battery) on the starter relay. No need. Just pull the single wire connector off that pin when the starter gets stuck. That will ensure that nothing electrical is driving the relay. If the starter stops spinning, then your ignition switch is the culprit. IF the starter keeps spinning, then tap the relay with the handle end of a screwdriver (or similar) to 'unstick' the contacts. I cannot really see the contacts being welded together especially on multiple relays. However, if the starter were drawing way too much current, it might happen.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
my car ran fine before but that was when i was running points i recently switched to duraspark. tomorrow morning im going to buy a new ignition switch at mustang country. if that doesnt work i might just go ahead and replace the starter as well. Thank you everyone for your input.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So i bought the ignition switch and installed it The car cranks right away, but as soon as I let go of the key the car shuts off Any idea why??
 
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So i bought the ignition switch and installed it The car cranks right away, but as soon as I let go of the key the car shuts off Any idea why??
Yes. Your 'pink' wire is not hooked up. Needs to be there to power the coil during run.
 

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What did you connect to the red/green wire coming off the ignition? That's where the pink wire goes, or whatever color you had there before. After 45 years mine didn't look pink anymore until I looked under the wrapping. Now might be a good time to just run a separate wire from that red/green on the ignition, straight to the coil. This will eliminate the 'pink wire' problem if there is one. Atleast do that to see if it runs fine, if it does, then that is your problem and you were suffering from the dreaded 'pink wire' syndrome. :bounce2:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I connected the red green just bypassing the pink wire. when cranking i have 10.x volts at the positive side of the coil.
 

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Yeah when cranking means nothing. Soon as the key goes to run only, it will cut it if you dont have the pink wire connected. Try bypassing it with a long wire, just run it out the window into the engine bay. A wire running from the red/green on the ignition to the coil plug that is not connected to the distributor. See if it runs that way. Easiest way to eliminate that as a problem. Or you can check the voltage running to the coil with the key in the RUN position and see what you get. If you get 12v while the key is on (not cranking), then ignore all my previous comments.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
In run with one test lead on the negative battery terminal and one on the positive side of the coil i get 12.74 volts. test lead on the positive side of the coil and the other on the negative side of the coil i get 0 volts. one test lead on the negative post on the battery and one lead on the negative side of the coil i get 12.74 volts. Is that normal?
 
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hockman is correct. However, you will not get 12v at the + coil side if the points are closed. With the points closed you should get closer to 6 or 7 volts. It is just simple Ohms law. So, with the key in the 'run' position, you can check the voltage at the coil and remove the distributor cap to open or close the points and watch the voltage change.
 

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hockman is correct. However, you will not get 12v at the + coil side if the points are closed. With the points closed you should get closer to 6 or 7 volts. It is just simple Ohms law. So, with the key in the 'run' position, you can check the voltage at the coil and remove the distributor cap to open or close the points and watch the voltage change.
i dont think that is correct as we are measuring voltage going to the coil before it even gets to the points. we are just trying to confirm he has 12v going to the coil from his new ignition switch while the key is on.

GC ignore the battery for now as it sounds like you are losing power to the coil after you stop cranking the motor. I posted easy instructions on how to check your voltage at the coil with the key on. just hook a volt meter up to the ignition switch side of the coil and ground the other probe on the motor.
 
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Gus, I would like to take a moment to explain why the 'pink' wire is in there in the first place. It might help in your troubleshooting (or those having similar issues) and understanding of ignition system. You may already know this but here goes:

A typical car battery will deliver approx. +12v to the cars electrical system. When you turn the key to engage the starter, the starter takes a LOT of current, perhaps greater than 100 amps. This large current flow drops the effective voltage at the battery terminals from +12v down to something lower, like 6 to 10 volts depending upon the size and design of the battery. So, the coil must be able to deliver a good spark at this lower voltage. The designers of the coil, realizing this, make the coil to work at say 6v (instead of 12v) so that the engine will have sufficient spark, while cranking, to fire the cylinders. Now, when the engine does start, the starter motor is turned off(when the key is released to the 'run' position) and the battery voltage jumps back up to +12v. But the coil was designed to run at +6v and to run at +12v will eventually burn the coil out...so what to do? The designers decided to put a resistor in series with the battery and coil to knock the voltage back down when running so as not to overheat the coil. This resistor is known as a 'ballast' resistor and is built into the 'pink' wire on our Mustangs(the wire is actually a resistance wire). This resistance wire is shorted out by the starter relay when you turn the key to 'start' thereby delivering the full battery voltage(which is going to be less than 12V) to the coil at start time.

Anyway, just a brief history and I hope it helps.
 
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i dont think that is correct as we are measuring voltage going to the coil before it even gets to the points. we are just trying to confirm he has 12v going to the coil from his new ignition switch while the key is on.
It is very correct. The points serve to ground the coil. Believe me, the voltage at the coil WILL change depending upon whether or not the points are open/closed if the ballast resistor is in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
OK checked voltage on the coil positive side with one probe on the coil and one on the engine block with the key in the start position reads 12.74 volts.

randal, the distributor isn't a points distributor its a Duraspark distributor and the coil is an MSD Blaster 2 coil does the 6v still apply? i checked the resistance of the coil and read exactly what MSD states it should. This really has me stumped

this is how the duraspark is wired in


is that correct? or is this one correct?
 

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gus, you need to test it with the key in the run position, not the start position.
 
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