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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Anyone know how to adjust a clutch that is New install... never adjusted previously.

I've just engine swapped and have a new 302 4 speed in.
The trouble I'm having is knowing how to get the freeplay in the clutch pedal.
Clutch pedal is smooth and has strong return spring. It either stays at floor or stays up pivoting in middle to go in either direction when NOT attached to z-bar. Basic pressure plate, not three finger...
Bell housing: Block 6 Bolt pattern-Aluminum w/ 157 tooth flywheel/and appropriate clutch fork.

having pedal in up position, I've attached to the Z-Bar and then adjusted the clutch rod up to the clutch fork. The rod sets nicely in the dimple with me being able to wiggle it around lightly with my finger... with enough force I could simple pull it out.. Then I've added the two return springs; the one that goes from the clutch fork to the z-bar and the one that goes from the z-bar to to the firewall...

This adjustment leaves the pedal at the very top but with NO preloaded pressure on the clutch fork/clutch diaphragm.

The main pedal return spring under the dash that seems to override the other two smaller springs in holding it up.

My clutch fork barely wiggles AT ALL when fully released. it has not no back and forth movement, only verticle up/down to indicate that there is no pressuee on it. If I have someone step on clutch there is NO wiggle in any direction indicating it is in contact with pressure plate.

So... my quesiton.. how does one adjust or achieve freeplay.. or do I already have it and just don't know????
 

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Since it has been converted to a diaphragm clutch, it is different on the feel and how it works according to some of the others on the forum. I can tell you about free-play, on a 3 finger which should be the same for a diaphragm, as the free play is to prolong the life of the throw-out bearing and to make sure the clutch engages fully and disengages fully, otherwise you will have slippage on the clutch and in turn heating, which will damage it, it should be 7/8"-1 1/8" at the pedal, I always use my hand to feel the difference when the throw-out bearing touches the clutch. The heavy spring under the dash is the clutch assist spring, it is not a return spring, it removes some of the pedal pressure on your foot, when the clutch is depressed all the way, some on the forum have indicated, that removing this spring still did not give it the feel of a 3-finger. Since I have not done this conversion, I can't give a lot of help. I hope someone else on the forum that has done this can give you more help. If your clutch return spring can not pull the clutch pedal back up, you may have to try a extra spring, or a heavier spring. You also need to double check the extra springs in the clutch linkage, that they are installed correctly. I wish I was more help. Good Luck.
 

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First of all, get an official Ford shop manual. You will be shooting yourself in the foot without it.

To adjust the clutch, take off those springs on the Z bar. Then you will need to adjust the the upper or lower linkage rod, whichever one is adjustable, so it has 1/8" slack in the linkage AT the bell housing end.

Tighten the lock nut on the rod, put the spring(s) back on the z bar and you are done,

Z
 

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Re the under dash assist spring, I've left it in place when installing numerous diaphragm clutches, and neither I nor my customers have had any issues. However there are anecdotal reports that occasionally the clutch pedal will stay on the floor when shifting at very high rpm. I have routinely shifted at 6,000 rpm on my Shelby's and K codes, and never experienced that phenomena. If it were my car, I'd leave it alone, until it showed up as a problem.

Z.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks...

I've never had a three finger clutch before and the "SHOP" manuals only really provide good info for original stock set ups. I have 3 total - the original 2 inch thick pea soup yellow/green one, the haynes and lastly the chilton and still none provided info that made sense. Z-Ray, you said remove springs adjust distance of rod to fork, tighten up and then put on the springs. That is exactly what I did.. it doesn't really give any free-play in my opinion but I do know for fact that fully up the clutch is engaged and fully down it's disengaged. So at this point I will drive it and be conscience of it until I know it is working correct.

In past I've built my mustangs to be more concours correct, but since this car is more of a restomod and less original it has proved more difficult for me as it's unexplored territory and figuring out things for my self by searching online, asking others, and trial/error. Doesn't seem to be a definitive answer for custom.. guess that's why they call it custom... :smile:

Thank you for your reply.. it does help...

-JT
 

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Once you put the z bar springs back on, they pull the linkage the 1/8" AWAY from the throwout bearing. So you don't feel the 1/8" slack anymore because the springs are putting some tension on the linkage.

Clear as mud ? I'm not the best "explainer" . So don't hesitate to ask again if if not making sense.

Z

PS. the Ford shop manual does give the procedure for setting the slack or clearance, but they do it by backing off the lock nut, then tuning the adjusting rod until it takes out all the slack and makes slight contact with the clutch fork dimple, then putting the correct feeler gauge between the lock nut and the adjuster rod, then remove the feeler gauge and then turn the adjuster rod back to meet up with the lock nut. That will give you the same result as what I posted above. I'll look up what page it's on sometime.
 
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