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Discussion Starter #1
Hey my peeps!:wavey

I want a 3.73 rear end for my 1990 5-speed (future turbo) Mustang. I know a guy selling a 8.8" rear end with 2.73:1 gears (stock 1988 GT rear end). I also know of many junk yards in the area that have automatic 2.3 mustangs... and lots of them! I want 3.73:1 rear gears for some quick of the line acceleration.

Should I go to a junk-yard and pick up a 7.5" 3.73 rear end or buy this 8.8" rear axle and dump some 3.73's in it? My turbo motor will be close to 300hp by the way... so another factor would have to be would the 7.5" hold up against 300hp? Obviously the more cost efficient way is to go to the junk yard and pick the 7.5" up for $100 rather than the 8.8" for $200 plus $150 for the gears.

Just reply on what you think i should do and why: 7.5" or 8.8"?

Thanks guys,

Steve
 

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Hey my peeps!:wavey

I want a 3.73 rear end for my 1990 5-speed (future turbo) Mustang. I know a guy selling a 8.8" rear end with 2.73:1 gears (stock 1988 GT rear end). I also know of many junk yards in the area that have automatic 2.3 mustangs... and lots of them! I want 3.73:1 rear gears for some quick of the line acceleration.

Should I go to a junk-yard and pick up a 7.5" 3.73 rear end or buy this 8.8" rear axle and dump some 3.73's in it? My turbo motor will be close to 300hp by the way... so another factor would have to be would the 7.5" hold up against 300hp? Obviously the more cost efficient way is to go to the junk yard and pick the 7.5" up for $100 rather than the 8.8" for $200 plus $150 for the gears.

Just reply on what you think i should do and why: 7.5" or 8.8"?

Thanks guys,

Get the 8.8" much stronger then a 7.5 and will easily hold the 300hp. For $100 more its an easy decision! And brand new Ford Racing gears are well worth it:bigthumbsup
 

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Buy the 8.8 and spring for the extra bucks for the gear swap. The gear swap will cost you another 350 bucks (app). Gears plus instilling price.:bigthumbsup :bigthumbsup :bigthumbsup
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Buy the 8.8 and spring for the extra bucks for the gear swap. The gear swap will cost you another 350 bucks (app). Gears plus instilling price.:bigthumbsup :bigthumbsup :bigthumbsup
Hey Tom, Are you trying to tell me to skip learning about how to swap rear end gears and let someone else work on my car? :nono::nono::nono: I have a good friend who happens to be my neighbour who also happens to be a mechanic who specializes in the driveline... He has helped me a lot thus far, I will be callign upon him again to teach me about the rear end. I have done basically everything myself thus far and am planning on saying "I built this car" when I am finished.

I have seen the tech articles on the issue, I don't think it will be very hard if I set the rear end down on a table and work through it slowly.

Thanks for your input... Definately will pring for the 8.8"!!!

Steve:bigthumbsup:bigthumbsup:bigthumbsup
 

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SM90, you may have misunderstood what Tom was trying to do. After reading posts made by a person, you start to get a feel for their technical prowess and mechanical ability. When something like ring and pinion setup is the subject, and you get the feeling the person may not be capable of setting pinion depth, runout, and backlash by themselves, you warn them that they may be getting in over their head. I'm not always as subtle as Tom. The fact is, no one wants to see someone get hurt, waste money, damage their car, or get frustrated and give up by taking on a job that may be outside of their skill level. I've read your posts and helped along the way, but I get the impression you're new to this or at least a little unsure of yourself at times. No offense, confidence and ability comes in time with experience. There are things I'm more comfortable letting a shop do as opposed to tackling it myself.

I can't speak for Tom and won't, but I can offer my opinion. Tom was just trying to help you get something done on your project and offered a means given an assumed skill level. Knowing that you have qualified help that can lend a hand and instruction changes things a bit. If you were on your own, even I'd suggest you take the first one to a shop. It's what I did when I did my first gear set.

So, ya got that rearend in yet? :gringreen
 

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Discussion Starter #6
SM90, you may have misunderstood what Tom was trying to do. After reading posts made by a person, you start to get a feel for their technical prowess and mechanical ability. When something like ring and pinion setup is the subject, and you get the feeling the person may not be capable of setting pinion depth, runout, and backlash by themselves, you warn them that they may be getting in over their head. I'm not always as subtle as Tom. The fact is, no one wants to see someone get hurt, waste money, damage their car, or get frustrated and give up by taking on a job that may be outside of their skill level. I've read your posts and helped along the way, but I get the impression you're new to this or at least a little unsure of yourself at times. No offense, confidence and ability comes in time with experience. There are things I'm more comfortable letting a shop do as opposed to tackling it myself.

I can't speak for Tom and won't, but I can offer my opinion. Tom was just trying to help you get something done on your project and offered a means given an assumed skill level. Knowing that you have qualified help that can lend a hand and instruction changes things a bit. If you were on your own, even I'd suggest you take the first one to a shop. It's what I did when I did my first gear set.

So, ya got that rearend in yet? :gringreen
Hey Chandler:wavey:wavey:wavey:happydance:, yes I am just starting out at this, and I do understand how technically difficult a task like this is. One of the reasons why I have tackled this project is to learn about this kind of stuff. And failure doesn't scare me, heck, I've messed up a lot on this project so far that has costed me a lot of headaches and lost time, but here I am, still pluggin' away and having a good time doing it. I realize that taking it to a shop and getting a warrantee would be my best bet, but if I take it there my first time and spend $300, then I might as well get them to do it next time because I still don't know how to do it, and I don't learn anything. When is my first time gonna happen (this has multiple connotations:laugh:)? If I am going to take it and let them do something that I could learn to do with reasonably simple apparatus and a head on my shoulders, then I might as well give my entire project to someone to do with a list of things that I want done on it and pay them a lump sum of cash that I don't have (I understand that if I mess this up, I will also be paying out of the pocket, but it will eventually start making me money).

This project has been over my head every step of the way, but each day I learn a little bit and my head resurfaces. This is not the first time that I had no idea what I was doing and yet went ahead and dove right in did it properly. I will talk to my friend. If he says that I should take it to a shop, so be it. If he says it is something he can teach me, so be it. My ideal situation would be

Thank-you guys for giving me some forewarning so I don't dive into things completely clued out to the risks involved. So if anyone wants to throw up a check-list of things to remember while I am at this, please go for it!

Steve:bigthumbsup
 
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