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The great Sniper experiment is not called off, but it is postponed until I can get the car on the road. All through this project I've known when to give it up to the pros. I had pros build my engine and now I'll have another tune it. I have an appointment for April 4 at Horsepower Ranch. This place is out in the middle of nowhere, forest and farms. I know I grew up out there. It also just hppens to be about 10 miles from where I live now and 9 miles from Pacific Raceways. Horse Power Ranch - Dyno Tuning Specialists. We Make HorsePower!

I was taking a video of the car today and I was looking at it tonight. When I started the car water (it had no smell) came gushing out both tailpipes. It's been sitting there for 6 months. Can gas separate and could I have water at the bottom of my tank? How can I tell and how to fix it.

P.S. I shouldn't have done it and I'm not going to do it again until I'm tuned but I took it around the block and punched it just once or twice just for a second or 2. It's going to be a rocket.
 

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Water certainly would have condensed over that time. Did you put any Stabil in the tank? I'd run a bottle or two of dry gas or Seafoam to get rid of the water.
 

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The great Sniper experiment is not called off, but it is postponed until I can get the car on the road. All though this project I've known when to give it up to the pros. I had pros build my engine and now I'll have another tune it. I have an appointment for April 4 at Horsepower Ranch. Horse Power Ranch - Dyno Tuning Specialists. We Make HorsePower!

I was taking a video of the car today and I was looking at it tonight. When I started the car water (it had no smell) came gushing out both tailpipes. It's been sitting there for 6 months. Can gas separate and could I have water at the bottom of my tank? How can I tell and how to fix it.

P.S. I shouldn't have done it and I'm not going to do it again until I'm tuned but I took it around the block and punched it just once or twice just for a second or 2. It's going to be a rocket.

It's probably just condensation that has built up in the exhaust system during storage. If you run the car long enough for the exhaust system to dry out completely and the oil to get hot enough to boil off the condensation that forms inside the engine then the water should be gone. Of course there will be more (about 1/2 cup or so every time you start the car as long as temperatures are low enough for condensation to form.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Water certainly would have condensed over that time. Did you put any Stabil in the tank? I'd run a bottle or two of dry gas or Seafoam to get rid of the water.
I've never put anything in the gas. Do you know how the stuff works or is it just magic?
 

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It's probably just condensation that has built up in the exhaust system during storage. If you run the car long enough for the exhaust system to dry out completely and the oil to get hot enough to boil off the condensation that forms inside the engine then the water should be gone. Of course there will be more (about 1/2 cup or so every time you start the car as long as temperatures are low enough for condensation to form.
That's not it because I just put in brand new exhaust front to back that was stored in the living room all winter.
 

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I've never put anything in the gas. Do you know how the stuff works or is it just magic?
Simple dry gas is nothing more than alcohol and will absorb water. It won't foul your plugs. Stabil is fuel stabilizer that keeps it from turning to varnish when sitting for an extended period.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Simple dry gas is nothing more than alcohol and will absorb water. It won't foul your plugs. Stabil is fuel stabilizer that keeps it from turning to varnish when sitting for an extended period.
I'll be getting some tomorrow. Thanks for the tip.
 

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I would put some 100 in it. Just do 1/3 of 100 and rest 93 or 91 and burn that off completely with out getting on it and then fill it up with what you plan to tune with.

one thing I do though is tune with lower graded 91. I like to tune with Valero 91 were I live and after the tune I only put in Cheveron. One reason is because if you ever buy bad gas it wont affect your car as much and if you are ever forced to put any other gas in it such as on a road trip you wont have to worry as much.

We have had good luck with tuning like that and I have never had issues like others have with having bad gas ever.
 

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I thought about higher octane but he really just needs some good, clean gas. Maybe a splash of 104 unleaded wouldn't hurt
 

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That strange that you had water when the exhaust is a new one. Maybe it is humid air from inside the house that condensed in the pipes when you took them outside. Do you usually have a humidifier running in the house?

If not, I don't know why it would have been from gas since you barely ran the thing. According to chemistry and for simplicity's sake, I'm only going to calculate this out for octane (since a gas molecule is between 5 to 12 carbons long), you would assume that:
2 C8H18 + 25 O2 --> 16 CO2 + 18 H2O
This says that for each molecule of gasoline you burn, you would get around 9 molecules of water vapor in a complete burn. With a density of gas about 703 grams per liter (at STP), octane's molecular weight of 114.2, 3.79 liters per gallon, water's molecular weight of 18.0, and water's density of about 960kg/m^3 at just below boiling (since all water would leave the engine as steam), you would expect that:

(1 gallon octane) x (3.79L/gallon) x (703g octane/L octane) x (1mol octane/114.2g octane) x (9mol water/mol octane) x (18.0g water/mol water) x (1kg/1000g) x (1m^3 water/960kg water) x (100^3 cm^3/m^3) x (1mL/cm^3) x (1L/1000mL) x (1 gallon water/3.79L) = 1.04 gallons of water

Basically, if I remember my chemistry, this says that for every gallon of gas you burn, you would get 1.04 gallons of (liquid) water. This is a high estimate though, since you wouldn't get a complete burn, and the water comes out of the engine as vapor and not liquid, so the only liquid you would see is what condenses on the pipes. Let's say that 99.5% gas in an engine is actually combusted with 0.5% remaining intact (this is a complete guess since I have no idea on the real number, but I would assume much lower combustion percentages would make your exhaust smell like gas) and that 4% of water vapor actually condenses when the exhaust piping is cold (once again, another guess; could be much higher), giving us an estimate of 0.04 gallons of water condensed per gallon of gas injected into the engine.

Finally, with each revolution of the engine with the fuel injector working at 39#/hr, assuming it is a V8 engine and that, from your other thread, lets say, 4 minutes total running time with an average of 1500rpm idle (I stole the base equation from Wikipedia's fuel injector page):

(Fuel flow rate) = (2.0 ms/intake-stroke) × (hour/3,600,000 ms) × (39 lb-fuel/hour) × (4-intake-stroke/rev) × (1500 rev/min) × (60 min/h) = (7.8 lb/h) x (1hr/60min) x (4min) x (453.6g/lb) x (1L/703g) x (1gallon/3.79L) = 0.089 gallons of gas (in 4 minutes)

(0.089gallons octane) x (0.04gallons water/gallon octane) = 0.004 gallons of water

So, this SHOULD mean that in the time you had your car running, 0.004 gallons, or about half a fluid ounce, of water had condensed on your exhaust pipes, which sounds like way less than what you were talking about.

However, since you mentioned your engine had been flooded with gas a couple days ago, much more gas than predicted could have been burned and would have produced more water, so maybe that is where your extra water came from?

And as far as gas breaking down in the tank to form water, I would doubt it. While I am guessing gas would break down into CO2 and water in the presence of oxygen, I really wouldn't think it would produce a noticeable amount of water in only half a year, especially since the winter temperatures would slow its oxidation.

Like I said above, some of these numbers I assumed from what I thought would be reasonable for the situation, and the gas you burned may very well have caused the water.
 

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Oh and one more possibility: when you turned off the engine, more water vapor could have condensed once the vapor was no longer being pushed out of the pipe (and would be more or less sitting in the exhaust pipes until it either a) worked its way out the end of the exhaust system or b) condensed on the pipes)
 

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on that note, Im going to bed.

that seriously made my head hurt man.:laugh:
 

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I've never put anything in the gas. Do you know how the stuff works or is it just magic?
It's a chemical reaction to keep the molecules from reacting with air over time. It's magic:headscratch:. All I know is it does work. I've been storing motorcycles during the cold season for almost 40 years. I learned the hard way that gasoline turns to a varnish like substance as some of the chemicals evaporate. Carb jets and needles plug up and require a rebuild. Stabil keeps it from happening. I just started my bike for the first time in 4 months and it fired up with ONE KICK. I use Stabil in the stang, all 4 of my bikes, lawnmower, snow blower, weed wacker and any thing else that has gasoline. Actually, now when I buy gas for the mower and other small engines, I just mix Stabil right in the gas can. By the way, pump gas can go bad within 30 days.
The water you saw was condensation in the exhaust. Your short drive warmed it enough to form the condensation, but not enough to dry it out. This is common to all cars in colder, damper climates.
 

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Sorry, I got to talking Stabil and didn't offer any advice. The bad gas has to go. Mixing higher octane will help some, but DO NOT TUNE with old gas in the tank. Burn it off or drain it. I would also recommend fuel injecter cleaner run through the system as well. That will disolve any varnish that formed in the tank and is now flowing through the rest of the fuel system. After this tank is gone, buy 1/4 tank and use the fuel injecter cleaner. That stuff works well and 1/4 tank will clean averything out.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Thanks for all the tips. I will definitely Use the drying agents and also try to drain as much of this gas as I can before I go to the dyno tuner.
 

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It's a chemical reaction to keep the molecules from reacting with air over time. It's magic:headscratch:. All I know is it does work. I've been storing motorcycles during the cold season for almost 40 years. I learned the hard way that gasoline turns to a varnish like substance as some of the chemicals evaporate. Carb jets and needles plug up and require a rebuild. Stabil keeps it from happening.
I would think it would change the physical properties of the gas by keeping the byproducts from the gas' evaporation in a dissolved or combustible state.

Since gas is pumped from the ground, it must be distilled and purified. While the end product IS very pure, traces of petroleum-related "gunk" will still remain in the product. Since the main constituent of gas is volatile, it will evaporate fairly quickly if given the chance. As this happens, the I would assume the proportion of the gunk in the gas raises since it stays at roughly the same amount in the tank while the amount of gas lessens from evaporation.

When this is burned, it would create more deposits since the actual gas burns quite easily compared to the gunk in the conditions of an engine.

My guess would be that stabil would work by dissolving and forming an azeotrope with the gunk where it can be carried away in the exhaust with much more ease than if the stabil wasn't present.
 

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Sorry, I got to talking Stabil and didn't offer any advice. The bad gas has to go. Mixing higher octane will help some, but DO NOT TUNE with old gas in the tank. Burn it off or drain it. I would also recommend fuel injecter cleaner run through the system as well. That will disolve any varnish that formed in the tank and is now flowing through the rest of the fuel system. After this tank is gone, buy 1/4 tank and use the fuel injecter cleaner. That stuff works well and 1/4 tank will clean averything out.
One thing while we're talking Stabil. It doesn't work on old gas. You need to add it when the gas is fresh. Once it starts to varnish, Stabil does no good. That's when I'd use Seafoam.
 
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