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Discussion Starter #1
Got a new clutch around a year ago. Now when the clutch is out (when I'm in neutral with my foot off the clutch) I'm hearing tweetie birds. It goes away when I push the clutch in a little bit.

Any idea what this means?

Thanks guys!
 

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throwout bearing.
 

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so he bearing will eventually lock up??
 

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Discussion Starter #4
did a bit of research, i'm guessing when I had my clutch replaced they just threw in a new throwout bearing...but not a new pilot bearing. Local shop wants $275 to replace both.

Any guesses if this will solve the problem? Thanks guys!
 
J

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Chirping rarely means you have a problem with your TOB (grinding, crunching, or whining does) -- though you'll see people commonly replace them because of the chirping. It usually means that it's skipping off of the pressure plate fingers from being adjusted too loosely -- especially if putting a little pressure on the pedal relieves it. If you have an aftermarket adjustable quadrant / cable you'll want to adjust it tighter. If you don't want to adjust it tighter (which can cause it to wear more quickly) then you could consider one of these:

LDC Chicago Clutch Freeplay Correction Kit [LDC-FREEPLAY] : Lethal Performance, Performance parts for Ford Mustangs

The stock self-adjusting quadrant pre-loads the TOB against the pressure plate fingers. This causes it to wear quickly, but it doesn't chirp. With an aftermarket quadrant, when you leave slack in your cable adjustment, there's nothing to guarantee that the TOB won't bounce back towards the pressure plate and cause the chirp. The spring kit above (or any spring of your choosing) to positively push/pull the clutch fork away from the pressure plate (and to take up the full slack from your cable) will fix the problem with the chirp. It also removes the "dead spot" from the top of the pedal travel.

The pilot bearing makes different noises usually when the clutch is fully disengaged. Give it a try, you might be able to save your ca$h. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Wow, I love this place!

Where, praytell, does one install this spring? Hoping a relative newbie DIYer can do it, and that it comes with instructions!
 
J

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Yes, it does come with instructions and it's extremely easy to install. You'll have to get under the car and remove the clutch-fork cover / dust-shield (1 screw, on the driver's side). You then remove the cable from the fork (prying the fork forward if needed). The metal spacer goes on first (clears the cable retainer clip), then the spring. Then, pry back the fork and re-install the cable end. Put back your dust cover and hopefully the birds will be gone. :)

This link has a picture of one installed: Ldc Freeplay? - SVTPerformance

You could use any spring, but I like this kit because it's not very expensive and fits under the dust cover (I was just going to rig a brake spring to some bracket or something but this is just what I wanted).

I've had one on my car for about a year now, works perfectly. It adds next-to-nothing to the pedal pressure, I couldn't tell a difference at all. Except no chirping and when I go over a bump my clutch pedal doesn't clang anymore. Good luck!
 
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