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Discussion Starter #1
i dont know if the new style is different i have an 02GT and there is a way to adjust the clutch. Yes i do know it is a self adjusting clutch and that is why i was skeptical but by moving the quadrant above the gas peddle you can change the friction points Like i said i dont know if it will work for 05+ model but i know i like mine alot better now took it out of the floor and about mid-range where id prefer. its worth a shot if you dont like it just use your foot to pull the peddle back out and try again. I went two clicks if anyone has questions just pm me or post back on the thread


i did not write the following.

how to adjust your clutch without an adjuster (and no not by lifting the pedal)....this REALLY adjusts it/works!!


This article will hopefully explain how to easily adjust the stock clutch in your Mustang. Many people think that all they can do is use the self-adjust mechanism as described in the owner’s manual and then live with that, or else buy an aftermarket adjustable clutch cable or some other device. Well, that is not exactly true, since the stock clutch setup is completely adjustable so the clutch can be made to release or engage at any point in the pedal travel. Reasons you might want to adjust the clutch:
Clutch is getting worn out
Clutch pedal has a "dead" or "mushy" feeling to the first part of the travel
Difficulty shifting (shifter doesn’t move freely, or gears clash, etc)
Just a preference to set the clutch engagement point where you want it Obviously each of these reasons can be due to other problems, but since this is a "no cost" modification, you might consider trying it first. For safety, I strongly recommend that you spend the time getting to know how the clutch and the adjustment mechanism work, so that you will really understand what you are doing. Also, any clutch adjustment should be performed with the engine turned off, transmission in neutral, and the parking brake firmly set. There are two ways to adjust the clutch, depending on the reason you are adjusting it in the first place. The standard procedure called out in your owner’s manual is to pull the clutch pedal back toward the driver’s seat. Sometimes this is referred to as "lifting" the clutch pedal since it is usually done with the toe of your shoe while you sit in the seat. This activates the self-adjusting mechanism and is generally fine for most people and is the procedure to use as the clutch wears normally. The second method is the one most performance enthusiasts would probably want to consider, as it allows the clutch to be adjusted so it releases/engages wherever you desire for your particular driving style. This is one of those jobs that can literally be a pain in the neck if you really want to understand how the stock clutch adjustment mechanism works, since you have to look up under the dash from the throttle pedal’s point of view. But, the actual adjustment can easily be done kneeling next to the car and reaching under the dash once you know the method, this is especially good if you are like me and don't fit under the dash very well. Now, it is important to understand the basics. Viewed from the driver’s seat, the brake pedal is between the clutch pedal and the throttle pedal. However, looking under the hood you will notice that the clutch cable goes through the "firewall" between the brake booster and the throttle cable. http://www.corral.net/images/tech/clutch1.jpg
This picture is taken from the radio’s point of view, looking toward the driver’s side of the car. The dash is removed in this photo along with all of the interior trim that would normally be visible from this angle. It shows the steering shaft (goldish colored), clutch and brake pedals (black - hanging down in the center of the picture). So to the right of the picture is the "firewall" (forward in the car) and to the left would be the driver’s seat. Although the picture does not show the complete quadrant assembly, studying it should help you understand the mechanism. (I found this in the "random pictures from the past" pile in a drawer and hopefully it is good enough, as I really don’t feel like taking the dash apart to get a better picture for this article. If someone has a better picture, feel free to submit it to the Corral and it will be added.) The clutch pedal is solidly connected to the shaft that comes through the top center of the picture. This shaft is also solidly connected to the steel arm that extends forward and holds the small ratchet mechanism seen in the upper right of the picture (with a clip holding the ratchet to a small shaft on the
steel arm). Ignore everything else for a moment and just think about what happens when you push the clutch pedal. The pedal moves to the right in this picture, causing the shaft in the top of the picture to rotate counterclockwise, causing the small ratchet mechanism assembly to rotate upward. Once you understand that, then the rest will be easier to follow. Now would be a good time to define exactly what this "quadrant" thing is that people talk about. A quadrant is just ¼ of a circle. It is the light colored part of this clutch ratchet mechanism that is in the top center of this picture (actually appears to be more like 1/3 of a circle). It has little teeth on its perimeter and is held onto the clutch pedal shaft by the clip that is visible. However, the quadrant is floating on the shaft, as it is not splined to the shaft and does not directly have to rotate with the shaft (this is a very important part of understanding how the mechanism works). The clutch cable comes through the "firewall" and attaches to the top of the quadrant, in much the same way that the throttle cable attaches to the throttle body. (Unfortunately this section of the quadrant is out of view above the picture.) Again, think about what happens when you push the clutch pedal. The small ratchet mechanism assembly on the right rotates upward. This small ratchet mechanism has teeth that are meshed with the quadrant’s teeth, causing the quadrant to rotate counterclockwise, pulling the clutch cable. If you have difficulty visualizing all of the motion from the picture and this description, then it may be worthwhile at this point to look at it in your car and push the pedal by hand so you can watch what happens. Now, let’s look at the two actual adjustment methods. The first method is the one described in the owner’s manual. If you pull the clutch pedal back toward the driver’s seat, you will be rotating the small ratchet mechanism assembly downward. Looking at the picture, you’ll notice that the small ratchet mechanism will push against a metal "tab", causing the teeth of the small ratchet mechanism to disengage from the teeth of the quadrant. This causes the clutch to self adjust into the normal location. Many people (including me) find that this makes the clutch pedal position annoyingly close to the floor when the clutch engages/disangages. The second method is the one you are most interested in and you can probably already see what to do if you understand how the whole ratchet/quadrant thing works.
 

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that is pretty kewl bud...to bad it won't stay at the top of page...alot of people are always wondering how you adjust the clutch.
 

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Excellent post

I registered on these forums just to say thank you to you. i have an 89 5.0 and couldn't figure out why the clutch made a loud pop and then went straight to the floor. the cable from the firewall to the trans was fine and i had a hard time seeing what was connected to the pedal. thanks to your post i found the problem and can now also adjust the pedal to my preferences. the post above me is absolutley correct this thread deserves to be a sticky topic near the top of the forums pages. Thanks alot again bud.
 

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Yup, I'd agree with whats been said. Whenever I look in the 2005+ forum there's tons of stickies for useful info. We hardly have any :scratchchin

WE NEED MORE STICKIES!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
well i know when i found it i thought i would share bc it seemed to fix me right up how i like it :bigthumbsup +1 for the stickie
 

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This is good info and I wish I had found this three weeks earlier. I already changed out the parts for the Steeda firewall adjuster, Steeda adjustable cable and Steeda Quadrant. I've been meaning to do a write up/how to with the pics I took. I haven't had time since I am in the process of moving.

Good post, nice to help members out who wouldn't need to pay for the adjustable parts, although I feel more peace of mind having them in my car(stock quadrant made of plastic isn't too reassuring).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
yeah this is a good way to ave money if your clutch has dropped or if you just wanna change the way in engages it will deffinately be able to be set back too... still waiting on that stickie though :bigthumbsup:bigthumbsup:bigthumbsup
 

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Since this got stickied, I think it is important to let everyone know the rest of the story.......

General rule of thumb is you need 1/4" gap between the face of the throw out bearing and the fingers on the pressure plate when the pedal is all the way out at the rest position. It can be fine tuned to get the "feel" your accustomed to, but under no circumstances should the bearing ever be in constant contact with the fingers or you will experience premature failure of the throw out bearing.

The second part of the equation is to check and adjust the air gap. Air gap is simply the distance between the clutch disc surface and the mating surface of either the flywheel or the pressure plate when the pedal is pushed down to the floor for disengagement.
If the air gap is not correct, you will shorten the life of the clutch as well as the life of the internals on the transmission.
On a diaphram style pressure plate (the kind we use in todays cars. They have 20+ little fingers vs. the 3 finger borg & beck type of the '60's and 70's), the air gap should be between .030"-.050". We normally shoot for .030".
It can be checked in 2 ways. The easiest way is to go in through the inspection cover at the bottom of the bell housing or you can go through the starter pocket (starter removed :hihi:). You will need a set of feeler gages, .030" to be exact.

You will need a buddy to help you. One of you sit in the car and push the pedal to the floor and hold it while the other person takes the .030" feeler gage and slides it up between the disc surface and either the flywheel mating surface or the pressure plate mating surface. The "feel" you are looking for is identical to the "feel" you have when you gap a spark plug. Not too tight but not too loose.

To adjust the air gap, you adjust the throw out bearing. Move it closer to the fingers of the pressure plate to increase the air gap and move it further away from the fingers to decrease the air gap.


Both of these adjustments are critical and necessary to pro-longed life of both the clutch and the transmission. :bigthumbsup



Richard
Tech Support
Tremec TKO, T45 & T56 Transmission Systems
 

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Clutch play

Thanks, Richard.

I was just looking over your recent posts and thinking about asking you if I could add that part to this sticky.
 

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I probably need to do this! If my clutch is completely disengaged it squeaks and its oh so very annoying. Some friends say its a throw out bearing or something like that.. But once I put my foot on the clutch and push it in an inch or two or all the way in it completely stops.. Would this help or what?
 

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I wish i would have read this before i got the steeda kit.
 

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Clutch too hard

Ok so as the subject says my clutch is toooooo hard (its so hard that girls can not use my car)

So I read this post and I tried to do the adjustment. I understood the ratchet/quadrant mechanism completely. But what I found out is I need to move the quadrant up in order to loosen the clutch! When I push the pedal up i.e. towards the driver side it allows me to move the quadrant down(which allows to make the clutch harder) but not up!

so my question is how do I move the quadrant up??? look at the pictures attached! the ratchet is at the top corner of the quadrant. I need to move the ratchet down and the quadrant up!!


PS: the pictures are taken from bottom...i.e. from gas pedal's point of view!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
pull the peddle out towards you! the easiest thing is to just buy and adjustable setup
 

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Yes only after pulling the clutch padel it allowed me to move the quadrant it in one direction but not in both direction!!!! Can somebody help plss!!!!
 

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Adjusted

Yes only after pulling the clutch padel it allowed me to move the quadrant it in one direction but not in both direction!!!! Can somebody help plss!!!!
Number one, the purpose of the adjustment is to compensate for the inevitable wear in the clutch. It is NOT to yield a softer clutch - it won't. The clutch will work BETTER, not EASIER.

An adjustable clutch cable (I would recommend a firewall adjuster type) will allow the position where the clutch functions to be more finely tuned, but IT will not yield a soft clutch such as is commonly found with cars with small engines and hydraulic power assist clutches.

Also, if you are having issues other than the lack of a hydraulic clutch (now available on 2005 and newer Mustangs) read carefully the several posts that deal fully with adjusting the clutch itself, which goes far beyond messing with the quadrant.
 

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hey i've got a question for you.. Hopefully you'll be able to give me some advice I recently paid a guy to put in a clutch in my 96 gt. i had the flywheel turned and all and at first it used to shake letting out the clutch and other than that seemed fine as far as the pedal is concerned... but i was driving the other day and i was comming up a wet hill and punched it in 1st and it spun no prob hit 2nd and it spun then grabbed then i went to shift into 3rd and had like no pedal... i don't have a clue what to do.. I just hope i didn't kill the new clutch or something. it don't grind or anything but my pedal is litterally on the floor you barely let it move and your going. used to be at like the middle of the stroke. I'm gonna check the clearance.. I'm not sure how to adjust the throw out bearing if it's not at .030'' :headscratch:please try to explain it to me if ya would just tring to find a solution with out having to pull the transmission again... i greatly appreciate any advice..:bigthumbsup
 

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Sounds like you have a messed up cable, or a stripped quadrant. The quadrant is plastic and a known weakness. Ditto the cable when it gets some age on it, or if the firewall flexes, etc, etc. Probably the cable. You will have to get up under the dash with a flashlight to eyeball the quadrant and where the cable hooks up, and under the car to do the same with the arm and the cable where it hooks up.

Review the posts at the top of this thread that go through the procedures for adjusting the clutch as well.

Who did the clutch install? You might take it back to them and see what they say if you are not a mechanic.

hey i've got a question for you.. Hopefully you'll be able to give me some advice I recently paid a guy to put in a clutch in my 96 gt. i had the flywheel turned and all and at first it used to shake letting out the clutch and other than that seemed fine as far as the pedal is concerned... but i was driving the other day and i was comming up a wet hill and punched it in 1st and it spun no prob hit 2nd and it spun then grabbed then i went to shift into 3rd and had like no pedal... i don't have a clue what to do.. I just hope i didn't kill the new clutch or something. it don't grind or anything but my pedal is litterally on the floor you barely let it move and your going. used to be at like the middle of the stroke. I'm gonna check the clearance.. I'm not sure how to adjust the throw out bearing if it's not at .030'' :headscratch:please try to explain it to me if ya would just tring to find a solution with out having to pull the transmission again... i greatly appreciate any advice..:bigthumbsup
 

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Now, let’s look at the two actual adjustment methods. The first method is the one described in the owner’s manual. If you pull the clutch pedal back toward the driver’s seat, you will be rotating the small ratchet mechanism assembly downward. Looking at the picture, you’ll notice that the small ratchet mechanism will push against a metal "tab", causing the teeth of the small ratchet mechanism to disengage from the teeth of the quadrant. This causes the clutch to self adjust into the normal location. Many people (including me) find that this makes the clutch pedal position annoyingly close to the floor when the clutch engages/disangages. The second method is the one you are most interested in and you can probably already see what to do if you understand how the whole ratchet/quadrant thing works.[/quote]


I understand the first method but is the rest of this article missing concerning the second method. I guess I don't understand the ratchet/quadrant thing enough to understand what this next step is. I have an 02 V6 and the clutch engages/disengages too far off the floor. Can I solve this without having to buy a fully adjustable clutch kit?
 
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