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Air raid intake showed up a few days ago so I grabbed my camera and snapped pics during the install and like my suspension installed thread, thought I would offer my own input on any tips/tricks and things to be aware of before starting the install.

I can only assume that a lot of this won't apply to other intakes but the removal of the stock intake steps would.


So lets get going!


First, before even opening the hood of the car, I would suggest you get a few things out of the way.

If your car is a manual transmission, there's a blank grommet you have to install into the intake tube. This is hands down one of the most frustrating things I have ever dealt with in my life when it comes to modding a car. It was WAY harder than it should have been and I had to go get my neighbor to help me with it.

The problem is that the grommet size is I guess designed so that once it's in the hole of the air tube, it's incredibly snug and tight. The issue with this is that the rubber compound that the grommet is made of is VERY hard and doesn't flex much at all so it really hard to manipulate it so that it can squeeze through into the hole.

What we ended up doing was holding it with a pair of pliars up to the high wattage shop light long enough that it softened up the rubber allowing it to bend easier. It took a few tries doing this before we figured out the best angle to go into the hole with and how much time we had to try and walk the inner lip of the grommet around the rim of the intake tube's hole to get it in.

You basically have to go in at about a 75* angle while squeezing the grommet from each side (like you're trying to bend it in half) and then as you're pressing in really hard on the grommet, keep turning it in one direction so the bottom lip of the edge of the grommet slips down into the intake. It's tough but it CAN BE DONE.

Proof






Air Raid... if you are reading this, please please please find a different type of grommet to use for this... something softer at the least. That concrete hard grommet that came with the kit quite literally doubled the amount of time it took to install this kit. :nono: And to be quite honest, it made me wish that I had bought the steeda intake instead. We were on the verge of getting in my other car and driving out to Home Depot with the intake tube to find a replacement grommet that would fit.



After that's in and if you're planning on removing the stock cabin air tube, go ahead and slip the rubber cap onto the air tube hole on the new intake tube and use the small band clamp to secure it down.



With that bit out of the way, there's one more thing that you should do before you start pulling stuff apart. Put the rubber trim around the top of the air box. The trim that seals off the air box when the hood is shut is a very durable and high quality piece of material that has metal inside the rubber that allows the rubber to hold it's shape and the little U shaped groove in the bottom of the strip has metal prongs embedded in the rubber that allows the strip to "grip" the top edge of the air box.




Reason I say do this before you start is that it's not easy to get this slipped down onto the edge of the air box. It's (again) a very snug fit that requires some patience and elbow grease to press it on all the way. It was roasting hot in my garage and doing this with everything already bolted into the car was a mistake. If I had it to do all over again I would have surely done this in a nice air conditioned house.



So those are my 2 biggest tips for installing this thing. Do those before you start in a nice air conditioned place rather than sweltering in a hot garage.


Anyways, here comes the install pics!

All the pieces







First unbolt the strut brace (if applicable) and engine cover (pops right off)





Next, using an 8mm socket, loosen the metal band clamps on the throttle body and air box






Next, with a pair of pliers, squeeze the clamp for the cabin air tube. It will catch a little tab and lock into place open.







Next (if you plan on removing the air tube) unbolt the little housing from the chassis and simply pull the air tube out of the firewall then pop the plastic firewall plug in (supplied with the intake)





Next, remove the drivers side crank case hose by pressing the light gray lock tab (shown here with my index finger) and pull the hose out.




Next, with a socket extension, remove the bolt holding the air box down (this is the only bolt that secures the air box)




Then gently pop the red tab on the MAF electrical plug back and pull the plug out.





Now pull the stock intake tube out.




Pop these little plastic tabs out of the lower front side of the air box. It's the MAF wiring harness.




And remove the air box




Using the supplied torx bit, remove the two screws securing the MAF sensor to the stock air box.





If you're using a tune with the intake you can skip this but if you're using the stock tune (like me) slip this insert into the intake. This regulates air flow so the MAF can get the car's A/F ratios right.




Next, using the supplied 2 torx screws, mount the MAF sensor into the new intake.

Again, I've got a bone to pick with Air Raid on this. Why did you not include an allen wrench or proper torx bit to do this? The screws in the kit are not the same size torx opening as the stock MAF sensor screws. If you're not going to use the same size screws, please do us a favor and include the appropriate size bit or allen wrench to get the new bolts in. Luckily I had an allen wrench that worked but what if I didn't? SOL I guess? If you can include one bit to get the stock screws out, you can surely afford to include a different bit to get the new screws into the new intake tube... or simply re-use the stock screws.




So with the new MAF sensor in, install the large grommet into the intake tube



And pop the large metal barb into the grommet.




^ That could also be done inside after you install the blank grommet.

Next, bolt the large circular flange piece to the air box (can also be done inside before install process begins)




Next, remove the two rubber grommets from the bottom of the stock air box and insert them down into the 2 little holes in the chassis



And then slide the new air box down so the little cones on the bottom of the box go into those grommets, the cold air inlet from the front of the car slips over the lip of the air box properly and the bolt hole lines up.







Next, slip one of the large metal band clamps around one side of the hump hose coupler and then slip the coupler onto the flange (the one mounted with 3 screws) coming out of the air box then tighten the band clamp down.



Slip the 2nd large metal band clamp onto the other end of the hump coupler but don't tighten it, in fact, loosen it up as much as you can without it opening up.


Next, place the medium sized metal band clamp over the small end of the silicone reduction coupler then slip it onto the throttle body and tighten the clamp down.




Next, slip the last of the large metal clamps over the coupler and then slip the intake tube into the coupler, rotate the tube down and if necessary, push the air box to the side a bit to slip the other end of the air tube into the hump hose coupler.

Make sure the tube is slipped all the way into the couplers and then tighten the metal band clamps.






*** One thing to be aware of is the orientation of the band clamp screws at the throttle body ***

The reason for this is that if the screws are facing up, the engine cover won't slip down snugly around the throttle body. You need to orient the clamp screws OPPOSITE of how I have them in the pictures. They need to be over on the drivers side facing UP rather than how they are. I had to go back and remove the clamps and re-position them when I realized this.

I don't think that the one on the throttle body is affected by this but I do know that the one holding the large end of the reduction coupler is directly under the little chrome lip of the engine cover.




After the intake hose is on, slide the crank case tube clip onto the new flange






Next (and yet again, another gripe) install the stock bolt originally used to mount the air box.

Air Raid, the stock washer attached to the factory nut did not offer much confidence that the box was securely mounted because of how large the diameter of the hole of the airbox was. It was marginally small enough to hold the bolt/washer.

A larger washer would have been nice to have here because even the slightest bit too much torque to this bolt would send it through the hole in the bottom of the air box. A 5 cent washer would have made this a non issues but it was yet another thing that I shouldn't have to worry about when paying this much for an intake.





Next, take the cone filter out of the box and mount it to the other side of the flange.




Ensure everything is tight now, pop the engine cover back on then re-install the strut brace and take it for a spin!









** Driving Impressions **


I'm not sure that this is totally intended to make a tremendous difference with the stock tune. It seems like it's primarily to enhance the gains that an ECU tune would offer so in that regard, don't expect huge gains. 15~ish HP is a nice gain but I don't feel a big seat of the pants gain. There is a bit more pull so there IS more power there just not a ton.

I'm going over to a buddy's house today who runs a dyno shop here in town to try and schedule a day I can go out there with the stock air box, pop that back on, make a few pulls and then put the air raid back on and see what sort of gains I got. With the temperatures now in triple digits and even hotter inside the dyno room and high humidity, I'm not expecting stellar results.


Anyways, at the end of the day, I don't regret my choice to go with AirRaid. They have a few things that they need to address in my own opinion but at the end of the day, the quality is there, the fit is perfect and I ended up getting it shipped from UPR for a little over $300.


Air raid, if you're reading this. Please consider using a blanking grommet that's easier to install for the manual transmission guys, include an allen wrench or torx bit to install the MAF sensor screws and a washer to go under the screw holding the air box down.

Get those 3 problems addressed and I will be able to confidently recommend your product to others.

An intake install should not be hard or frustrating and there's nothing worse than getting blind sided by things like that and having a 1 hour project turn take nearly twice as long.

I've read of other guys with different intakes also being sent to hardware stores for parts they weren't expecting to need or have to use so your intake isn't the only one to blame but for over $300, these nickle and dime or dollar parts being needed is unnecessary.
 

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Excellent How To... Am considering adding the Airaid, but unsure what gains to expect, and whether it's worth $300... Looking forward to the dyno results..

An old trick for difficult rubber parts is to put them in hot water to soften 'em up... sorta like your heat lamp trick, but more uniform.

Thanks!! :bigthumbsup:bigthumbsup
 

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Excellent :bigthumbsup I hope Air Raid heeds your advice. Thanks for sharing the install with us. This will greatly help me on my future Air Raid CAI.
 

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Nice install! I just finished my v6 airaid install literally 5 minutes ago, took about 1.5 hours and the hardest part of it was getting the rubber piece over the throttle bottle, what a pain in the ass lol. I haven't driven it yet, gonna hit the shower and take it out for a spin however, just cranking it up I could hear an obvious difference, a nice whistling sound coming from the intake into the engine.
 

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great write up! :bigthumbsup very informative
 

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As always, Fastred, great writeup and outstanding photos. I love posts like this. I've put many CAI kits on different engines before and it's always nice to have some great pictures to reference.

I have the same CAI sitting in my garage and don't even have the GT to put it on yet.:yelwacko:

Thanks!:bigthumbsup
 

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Okay I only read a few sentences, but I do want to say this: guys, this is an air intake we're talking about. We're not rebuilding an engine here. It's a simple bolt-on. What's more, the kit comes with install instructions with pics!

As for the GROMMET: I've read several threads where people complain about the grommet. Well, I think these pleas for a design change are ridiculous. I popped it in using my fingers in about a minute. No help, no tools...geez guys. And no, I'm not a muscle man or anything.
 

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Just a lil question:

Is it necessary to remove the tower brace when installing the air-aid system?
 

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Just a lil question:

Is it necessary to remove the tower brace when installing the air-aid system?
Yes. It's necessary because you can't get the cover off unless the brace is removed.


Okay I only read a few sentences, but I do want to say this: guys, this is an air intake we're talking about. We're not rebuilding an engine here. It's a simple bolt-on. What's more, the kit comes with install instructions with pics!

As for the GROMMET: I've read several threads where people complain about the grommet. Well, I think these pleas for a design change are ridiculous. I popped it in using my fingers in about a minute. No help, no tools...geez guys. And no, I'm not a muscle man or anything.
Did he say anything about "rebuilding an engine?" If it's not your cup of tea to read such posts then don't read them. There are many people who come to these forums to read and learn something; and for many something simple like a CAI may just be their first mod. All Fastred did was give an opinion and maybe helped someone out. Geeze...:nono:
 

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I just installed mine last night. The install was fairly simple, but I hate the way it sounds. Now my car sounds like a squeeky wheel going down the street. Is that normal? It's a super annoying whistling noise.
 

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Nice write up and pictures.
Anyone doing this type of work should have a complete set of allen bits or wrenches in their arsenal of shop tools.
A little dab of dielectric grease applied to the blind grommet and it pops into place with minimal effort.
 

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I guess your gonna leave the insert in, any reason you did not get a tune?
 

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As always, Fastred, great writeup and outstanding photos. I love posts like this. I've put many CAI kits on different engines before and it's always nice to have some great pictures to reference.

I have the same CAI sitting in my garage and don't even have the GT to put it on yet.:yelwacko:

Thanks!:bigthumbsup
I'm in the same boat. Thanks for the great write up.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I just installed mine last night. The install was fairly simple, but I hate the way it sounds. Now my car sounds like a squeeky wheel going down the street. Is that normal? It's a super annoying whistling noise.
Doesn't sound normal to me. check to make sure the hoses are plugged in snugly, check the grommet/barb for the drivers side crank vent hose and that all the clamps are tight.


Nice write up and pictures.
Anyone doing this type of work should have a complete set of allen bits or wrenches in their arsenal of shop tools.
A little dab of dielectric grease applied to the blind grommet and it pops into place with minimal effort.
I do have a full set of allen wrenches and torx bits but I was just a little puzzled as to why they include 1 bit to remove the screws but not another to install the screws that they supply with the kit.

Also, before we tried heating up the grommet to get it softer, I tried urethane bushing grease and that didn't help. The grommet that came with mine was literally hard as a rock.

I guess your gonna leave the insert in, any reason you did not get a tune?
I haven't decided which tune I want to go with yet. I'm leaning pretty hard to the Lund 93 street tune but I want to drive the car long enough to hopefully see whether or not I'm going to run into the engine knocking sound or transmission problems that the dealer would try and use the tune as the scapegoat.
 

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I seen now the airaid says it a MPX, what is this? Is this a new CAI or filter or is it the same just rebranded?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
you don't hear the intake sucking sound being funneled into the cabin.
 

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Great post , thank you very much for taking the time to do this :bigthumbsup
 
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