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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I plan on buy a New Mustang GT 2017, and wanted to give it a lot of extra oomph.

So far here is what I plan on getting:

The Driveshaft Shop Carbon Fiber One Piece Driveshaft - Manual
Hellion Twin Turbo - Tuner Kit
Roush R2300 727HP Supercharger - Phase 2 Kit
C&L Street Cold Air Intake & Bama X4 Tuner

Might get me some hate but, SpeedForm Lambo Door Kit

Any suggestions to up performance?
 

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I'll answer seriously even though I think you might be kidding me with your list.

The Roush SC kit is the only thing on that list you should start with. Add a few suspension items to improve handling and get power to the ground and you have a definite WOW machine.

CF driveshaft: perhaps aluminum better if this is a street car?
CAI and tuner. Won't need it with the Roush kit. Comes with that stuff.
Hellion as well as a Roush supercharger. Ummm.....clearly you are very well off. Tough plumbing that into the engine bay.
Lambo style doors might look okay if you don't hit your head on the door edge when you get in.

Good luck and have fun!

All the best. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry if it seems like I was joking around, extremely new to this stuff but very interested in learning.

What are the benefits of Aluminum over Carbon?

What are some suspension items you can recommend?

Thank you for the help.
 

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The stock two piece driveshaft is very heavy and often blamed for clunks and other noises. This said, many have used it in high horsepower applications very well.

Aluminum saves a bunch of weight and the one piece is supposed to be quieter than stock and better balanced with a higher rpm limit and ability to take more torque than stock. Cheaper than carbon fiber.

Carbon fiber is the strongest and is lighter than aluminum, although only marginally. Some concern that street use with stones and debris hitting carbon fiber can cause damage more easily than on aluminum. Benefits perhaps most noticeable in pure racing conditions. Added cost over aluminum may be more beneficially spent elsewhere? (unnamed online sources.)

I wish I could say something useful about suspension but I've only looked into the S197s like my 2014. The independent rear is so different as to be not comparable to what I'm familiar with. I'm sure there are lots of guys here who can help, though.

Thinking about this makes me want to get a new mustang, too. I think I turned over 6600 miles today.

Have a great day.

All the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Updated list:

Appearance:

Speed Form Lambo Door Kit

Performance:

Roush R2300 727HP Supercharger
Bama Rev-X Tuner by SCT w/ 2 Custom Tunes

BMR Lowering Springs - Handling
J&M Caster Camber Plates
BMR Adjustable Sway Bar End Link Kit - Front and Rear
BMR Adjustable Sway Bar Kit - Hammertone
KONI Sport Adjustable Rear Shock
KONI Sport Adjustable Front Strut

Kooks Long Tube Catted Headers - 1-7/8 in

JLT V3.0 Black Oil Separator - Passenger Side

The Driveshaft Shop Aluminum One Piece Driveshaft - Manual
 

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There's more to it than has been mentioned so far. "Seat time/driver mod, wheels & tires, everything else" is the general order of where the biggest improvements come from (at least as measured by autocross run times and road course lap times).


Anyway, you'll want wider wheels and tires than the GT/PP comes with. More like what the non-R GT350's come with would be a start, though with big power you might need a little stagger. "A little" is no more than 20mm front to rear tire size difference or 1.0" width difference in the wheel. More difference than that in a front engine/RWD car is normally reserved for appearance-only mod programs and drag racing.

Then there's the matter of seat time . . . but I'd urge you to get some seat time at autocross and HPDE even before proceeding very far with your car mod program. It can help you understand better what the car needs to make it better for you for the hard driving part. You might discover things that don't get fixed with stiffer springs and bars or better shocks. Right now, I'm having to assume that you're going to drive this thing pretty damn hard from time to time (hopefully on a road course).

For instance, there's a lot of compliance in the IRS that compromises away precision in the name of softer ride quality. BMR does have a number of IRS components that address this part of handling goodness (camber links, vertical links, cradle/diff bushings, and toe rods), and there is an aftermarket upper rear shock mount that is said to provide much better behavior as well (I'm not sure offhand whose these are, maybe they're Steeda's?).


Norm
 

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Since you are posting in the road racing forum, I assume you are interested in road track performance. If so, I would scrap that entire mod list, and instead first spend some money on a helmet and some track time with the car the way it is, like Norm suggested.

Then based on what you learn on the track, you can start to address the limiting factors. Most likely that will be tires and wheels, like Norm also suggested. Then maybe brakes, depending on what comes on the car you are buying. Then probably suspension and/or seats and safety equipment (roll bar, harness, hans device . . . )

Forget the supercharger and turbocharger for the road track; you don't need the extra power and don't want the extra weight up front, and definitely don't want the overheating problems that often come with those systems.

If you are interested in doing those mods "just for fun" then you will get a better response in the "2011-2014 Mustang Talk" forum.
 

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I agree with Norm and JBert. The S550's are pretty powerful and nimble on their own. Why not take it for a spin or two or three, see what it does that you like and dislike and then start thinking about putting a laundry list together. You may find it really doesn't need anything, or at least not till the driver becomes more experienced. The best way I know to not have a car anymore is to start adding go fast stuff before you know how to handle the go fast stuff. My car is SC and it took me years before I really got to know it. Once I did and knew what direction I wanted to take it, I then started making some changes to it. But a little at a time so I could adjust to the changes appropriately.
 

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Echoing what has been said above, drive it a bit first. A couple of online articles reference the biggest issue with the newer Mustangs is too much readily available horse power under the right foot , for most drivers. Biggest issue with loss of control accidents is tire spin!! literally Dozens of you tube vids of different cars losing it on dry pavement, and dozens more showing complete 360 with just a bit of rain!! First thing I'd do is upgrade the wheels and tires or at least the tires. Nitto and Falken make some seriously sticky street gear now!

If you do decide upgrades are in order a couple things that are overlooke,. When adding horses to a Mustang. The half shafts on the rear. FORD offers upgraded ones good to 1000+hp with a warranty. On a new drive shaft upgrade add better u-joints, its not automatic with a lot of suppliers. Check with your supplier on the boost kit, about the back half of the exhaust. Some system don't include cat-back and mufflers. Again often overlooked but opening that up frees up HP
 

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One more vote for the intelligent advice offered above.

Especially JBert's view that if you're into tracking the car . . . the FI setup makes things more challenging and not significantly more fun.

Suspension and Brakes

I happend to think the SCT tune(r) - even a canned tune - is a good idea
since if you eventually add things like headers and a CAI it'll be adjustable.
 
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