Ford Mustang Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Did carburated and efi have different covers? I need to know if a 87-93 timing cover will fit an earlier 80s carburated engine. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,171 Posts
Stock covers are differant. Newer EFI engins have a serpentine belt, and that reverses th4 direction of the water pump. The water passages in the front cover were changed to accomadate that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46,010 Posts
True about it not having the mechanical fuel pump hole. Just know the 79-93 timing covers have one part number and the 94 and up 5.0 covers have another number.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
Different part #'s for '79-'85 carbed, '82-'85 CFI, '86-'93 EFI, and '94-'95 EFI.

Most '86-'93 TC's will have the mounting boss, complete with threaded bolt holes cast into the cover, but the inner portion won't be cut-out. They will also have the mechanical fuel pump eccentric on the timing chain. Sometime in the 90's they eliminated the boss and eccentic, so there's another part # and change to be aware of.

M-6059-D351 is the FRPP replacement cover with the RR water pump, and fuel pump boss.

I' ve used both a '72 and '84 TC without any issues.

Here is what it should look like: Auto part Automotive engine part




Also, here's a handy chart: Head Line Auto part Font Illustration
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46,010 Posts
Great looking chart...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Stock covers are differant. Newer EFI engins have a serpentine belt, and that reverses th4 direction of the water pump. The water passages in the front cover were changed to accomadate that.
Well, that's odd .... the FRPP page (Ford Racing Performance Parts [M-6059-D351**])

says that the M-6059-D351 replacement cover is for both standard and reverse rotation pumps !

Can anybody confirm which is true ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
The D351 is indeed universal.

The trick is making sure you have the correct back plate on the pump that corresponds to the TC you're using.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
It really sounds like someone knows what they are talking about here. I have been trying to find out what timing chain cover I need to replace the one on mustang that has a 1991 5.0 HO engine in it. I want to put a mechanical fuel pump on it. Will one from a 85 GT V8 work??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,456 Posts
The water pump backing plate has round holes in it, they're not shaped like the ones in the timing cover, so the water pump doesn't care what timing cover it's bolted to.

As an example, I'm running a timing cover from a 1970 351W (standard rotation water pump) on a 1987 block, with a reverse rotation water pump bolted to it.

The only thing that matters on timing covers is whether or not the fuel pump and crank sensor mounts are there if you need them. If it has the dipstick hole and you don't need that, just run a pipe thread tap into it and put a plug in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
The water pump backing plate has round holes in it, they're not shaped like the ones in the timing cover, so the water pump doesn't care what timing cover it's bolted to.

As an example, I'm running a timing cover from a 1970 351W (standard rotation water pump) on a 1987 block, with a reverse rotation water pump bolted to it.

The only thing that matters on timing covers is whether or not the fuel pump and crank sensor mounts are there if you need them. If it has the dipstick hole and you don't need that, just run a pipe thread tap into it and put a plug in.
I have a '68 GT350 with a '69 351W. The car has new everything (radiator, heater core, t-stat, water pump with drivers side inlet) but still runs hot.

I was told that certain era/style water pumps need to be matched with certain era/style timing covers.

I was also told that while all era/styles will work together, mismatched components may not work very well, and can lead to overheating, etc.

Can anyonme comment on my situation?

Thanks
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top