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Discussion Starter #1
Completed all new brake lines, bleed and installed master cylinder and getting to bleed the system. There is a a little wetness around two in line couplers that won't go away. The lines are as tight a they can get.
Is ther anything else I can do to stop this? No real drips but my finger gets a drop on it when I rub around the threads.
Any suggestions? Will teflon tape help????
 

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If that's the only problem, take some plumbers tape and rap it around the threads. That should stop your leak, then bleed the system all over again. Starting with the right rear, then left rear, right front, and left front. If you have any access, to clear tubing you can pick it up at any local pet shop. The tubing they use on air pumps, for fish aquariums then slide it over the bleeder valve with the other end stuck into a plastic bottle. An empty window cleaner bottle will do just fine, now start bleeding your brakes with the clear tubing you can see when you have all the air out of the line. When you see no more bubbles in the tubing, close it off and go onto the next one etc. making sure you keep your master cylinder full at all times. Unless you have a vacuum pump, bleeding system myself I have a bleeding system but still prefer the old fashioned way with the clear tubing. Because I can see, with my own two eyes that there is no air left in the system with the clear tubing. If you decide to go that way, cut the tubing so you have at least 12" of tubing to go over the bleeder valve, and into the bottle, Mike. SCT Tuner.:bigthumbsup
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If that's the only problem, take some plumbers tape and rap it around the threads. That should stop your leak, then bleed the system all over again. Starting with the right rear, then left rear, right front, and left front. If you have any access, to clear tubing you can pick it up at any local pet shop. The tubing they use on air pumps, for fish aquariums then slide it over the bleeder valve with the other end stuck into a plastic bottle. An empty window cleaner bottle will do just fine, now start bleeding your brakes with the clear tubing you can see when you have all the air out of the line. When you see no more bubbles in the tubing, close it off and go onto the next one etc. making sure you keep your master cylinder full at all times. Unless you have a vacuum pump, bleeding system myself I have a bleeding system but still prefer the old fashioned way with the clear tubing. Because I can see, with my own two eyes that there is no air left in the system with the clear tubing. If you decide to go that way, cut the tubing so you have at least 12" of tubing to go over the bleeder valve, and into the bottle, Mike. SCT Tuner.:bigthumbsup
Mike, thanks for the help.
 

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You can try loosening the fittings and retightening them a few times. The flares may not be seated fully. This happens often with stainless lines as they are harder and don't seat as easily.
 

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The threads on a brake line fitting don't do the sealing. The surface of the flare and related contact surface on the component that it is attached to do the sealing. Are the line couplers made to accept inverted flares or are they pipe couplings? They must be inverted flare.

If you find that the couplings are the correct inverted flare type, you need to disassemble them and check the angled surfaces where the tubing seats and seals to it. If there are any grooves on these surfaces, the coupling needs to be replaced. Unless the couplings are also made of stainless, they are softer than the tubing and overtightening will produce the grooves and the resulting seepage.

All tubing in a brake system relies on the tubing's flare to do the sealing. There is no instance where the threads are supposed to do that job. As you most likely know, any seepage or leakage in the brake system plumbing is totally unacceptable. Applying teflon tape to the threads of the fitting is also a no-no. If any of the tape becomes dislodged and enters the system, there is a chance that it can cause a component failure. If there is a need for a thread sealant in a hydraulic system, always use the liquid type thread sealant.

You also need to check the tubing flares for any cracks. I have found bad flares on prebent and flared brake lines, in the past. Don't assume anything when it deals with a braking system, for obvious reasons.
 
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