Ford Mustang Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, and Happy Mother's Day to all the mom's out there.
I'm getting ready to change brake pads on my '05 V6 - and later my '04 droptop. My question is - can I just use a c-clamp on the front calipers to push them in to clear the new pads, or do I need to turn them clockwise to get them back in place like the rear ones?
Thanks in advance for any help and the benefit of your experience.
Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
pads

what pads did you decide to go with? I am replacing mine soon and was deciding between the HPS and ceramic hawk pads from AM.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I will Probably go with price more than any other thing. I don't see a need to spend outrageous prices for something that I know I will be replacing again.
I know all the arguments, but everybody does what he/she thinks is right at the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
BTW - Has anyone used one of those caliper "block shaped" tool, or can it be turned using a needle-nose pliers? I have also seen a model-specific tool that looks like a half-inch thick washer with two nipples on either side.
Any suggestions here sure would be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,632 Posts
what pads did you decide to go with? I am replacing mine soon and was deciding between the HPS and ceramic hawk pads from AM.
I would go with the HPS, they are better for a daily driver. The ceramic needs to warm up to take full advantage of them, and you won't be able to keep them warm on the street. They are however a bit quieter and will produce very little dust
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I would go with the HPS, they are better for a daily driver. The ceramic needs to warm up to take full advantage of them, and you won't be able to keep them warm on the street. They are however a bit quieter and will produce very little dust
I thought HPS were the ones that performed better when they were hot?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I wouldn't go with ceramic without changing rotors as well - assuming you still have the original ones on the car. The ceramic pads will wear out the rotors more quickly, so I have read.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
BTW - Has anyone used one of those caliper "block shaped" tool, or can it be turned using a needle-nose pliers? I have also seen a model-specific tool that looks like a half-inch thick washer with two nipples on either side.
Any suggestions here sure would be helpful.
You can't get leverage and torque need with regular needle nose, but needle nose Vise Grip worked great for me, with care not to damage the indents. Put piston in bench vise wrapped in shop rags so you don't scratch or gouge. Set pliers to proper fit, slide a long screwdriver through pliers for proper turning leverage. Works good if you already have the Vice Grips, otherwise, I think the actual brake tool is cheaper at Harbor Freight than the vice grips are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
For the rear just get the tool. You can find one at places like Harbor Freight or a local auto parts store for less then $10. This makes the job easy and saves you from busted knuckles trying to use the wrong tool for the job.

I have been running Hawk HPS pads for over 120,000 miles. They work great on the street and at the track, are easy on the rotors. I am on my second set by the way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,632 Posts
I thought HPS were the ones that performed better when they were hot?
No that's ceramic. The HPS are semi-metallic and are great for the street. They can even be used at the track
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
For the rear just get the tool. You can find one at places like Harbor Freight or a local auto parts store for less then $10. This makes the job easy and saves you from busted knuckles trying to use the wrong tool for the job.

I have been running Hawk HPS pads for over 120,000 miles. They work great on the street and at the track, are easy on the rotors. I am on my second set by the way.
Thanks, Do you use the cube or the model-specific one?
Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
465 Posts
I used the cube one, but the side with nubs that had the right spacing had four nubs and you only need two. I used a grinder to take off two nubs and it worked fine.

The model-specific tool is easier because it has a C clamp built it to keep pressure on the piston. When you use the nub you have to push down and turn the piston at the same time. It takes a fair amount of arm power to compress the piston, so I used a large C-clamp around the cube to press and turn at the same time.

Bruce
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
I bought a kit (not the block) from HFT. I think I paid $20 for it, but I Don't see it listed anymore.

This is the kit I see there now.
18 Piece Disc Brake Pad and Caliper Service Tool Kit

I've used this on our '06 mustang and the inlaws car, plus a few others. It works really well.

For the fronts, I still use a big c-clamp on the old pads since you can get more torque on it easily and its quicker to setup.

~Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
108 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
The model-specific one I saw didn't have a c-clamp on it. It looked like a fat washer with a 3/8 socket hole in the middle, and two nipples on one side. It is sold at sears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,864 Posts
The model-specific one I saw didn't have a c-clamp on it. It looked like a fat washer with a 3/8 socket hole in the middle, and two nipples on one side. It is sold at sears.
harbor freight has the kit you need. its 20-29.00. its got a clamp that turns and pushes, thats what you want for the rears. i didnt see it online either, but if you have a store neasr you, i would go there
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top