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How did you break in your new car? Just got a 2012 GT with Brembos and 3.73. Have had new vettes and tried to maintain lower RPMS for 500 miles.
 

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Most manufacturers have recommendations in the handbooks.
Basically you start off treating the engine very gently i.e. gentle revs and never more than 1/4 throttle. Over time you gradually use more revs and more throttle until you eventually end up using the full range of the engine. It is important to eventually end up using all the power and rev range to wear harden various parts. It is also important that you do not keep to a single continuous speed or gear but vary your speed quite a bit during this time (a long highway journey is NOT a good break in if you just sit in top gear at a continuous speed). This is because things are still hardening up and you can wear a groove into them.
Modern engines break in relatively quickly, often 1000km, older designs took longer as the tolerances were not as precise. The first oil change is often a lot sooner than later ones as during break in rough edges from manufacturing will be worn off and end up in the oil.
Here is more advice from various contributors:
Drive it gently. General rule is not to exceed 3000 - 3500 rpm. for the first 500 miles. It is also a good idea to be kind to it for the first 2000 miles.
"Breaking in" your cars engine is an old myth, it is also bull. Rule #1 if you want your engine to last a long time, treat it gentle all the time, not just for the first 1000km.
Break in is important. All engine bearings and cylinders, etc. must wear evenly and proper. Also, piston rings need to seat. Have you ever seen a new engine burn oil until it breaks in? Some piston ring take up to 5000 miles to fully seat or wear evenly to cylinder bore. Not following proper break in procedures could result in premature engine/parts failure.
This depends whether you purchase or lease a car. With a purchase you should break a car in for the reasons and using the methods described before, ignoring the one comment about it being bull. If the vehicle is a lease you may skip the break-in period if you so wish. Since not breaking-in a car may result in improper wear of parts, or even engine failure, during the warranty period it will be covered, and a leased car will be returned to the dealer before the warranty period expires.
You shouldn't just break-in your car if you are buying it. Even if you are leasing it you should. Do the next guy a favor. A very inconsiderate answer man. Besides some people lease it and then decide they like it and want to buy it, so I say, you should break it in anyway. No matter what.
If you research on how to break-in a new engine on the web, most sites will tell you a procedure to break-in the piston rings (the only thing that matters).
The proper way to break in an engine is to drive at 30 mph and accelerate to 50 mph. Do this to break in the engine the proper way. Do this the first 3000 miles or so.
Manufactures are making engines with much higher tolerances today. Where cylinder clearances used to be in the thousands of an inch, now its in the ten thousands. Bores are rounder and straighter. There is know reason to baby a newer engine, it will actually hurt. You need cylinder pressure to drive the rings out onto the bore, which actually shaves the bore into a perfect fit. By babying it the rings will only rub and burnish the surface leaving a less then Ideal finish. So ... keep the revs below 4000 the first 300 miles, then drive it ... accelerate with meaning for the next 2500 miles and your all set. This is how all High Performance engines are broken in, and all engines today can be considered a high performance engine since they pull more power out then there predecessors ever did.
Most modern car engines are broken in at the factory, before assembly. Therefore the old tradition of breaking in a new car doesn't apply anymore. Just drive as you normally would drive and treat the car the way you would treat anything else of value.
 

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Most manufacturers have recommendations in the handbooks.
Basically you start off treating the engine very gently i.e. gentle revs and never more than 1/4 throttle. Over time you gradually use more revs and more throttle until you eventually end up using the full range of the engine. It is important to eventually end up using all the power and rev range to wear harden various parts. It is also important that you do not keep to a single continuous speed or gear but vary your speed quite a bit during this time (a long highway journey is NOT a good break in if you just sit in top gear at a continuous speed). This is because things are still hardening up and you can wear a groove into them.
Modern engines break in relatively quickly, often 1000km, older designs took longer as the tolerances were not as precise. The first oil change is often a lot sooner than later ones as during break in rough edges from manufacturing will be worn off and end up in the oil.
Here is more advice from various contributors:
Drive it gently. General rule is not to exceed 3000 - 3500 rpm. for the first 500 miles. It is also a good idea to be kind to it for the first 2000 miles.
"Breaking in" your cars engine is an old myth, it is also bull. Rule #1 if you want your engine to last a long time, treat it gentle all the time, not just for the first 1000km.
Break in is important. All engine bearings and cylinders, etc. must wear evenly and proper. Also, piston rings need to seat. Have you ever seen a new engine burn oil until it breaks in? Some piston ring take up to 5000 miles to fully seat or wear evenly to cylinder bore. Not following proper break in procedures could result in premature engine/parts failure.
This depends whether you purchase or lease a car. With a purchase you should break a car in for the reasons and using the methods described before, ignoring the one comment about it being bull. If the vehicle is a lease you may skip the break-in period if you so wish. Since not breaking-in a car may result in improper wear of parts, or even engine failure, during the warranty period it will be covered, and a leased car will be returned to the dealer before the warranty period expires.
You shouldn't just break-in your car if you are buying it. Even if you are leasing it you should. Do the next guy a favor. A very inconsiderate answer man. Besides some people lease it and then decide they like it and want to buy it, so I say, you should break it in anyway. No matter what.
If you research on how to break-in a new engine on the web, most sites will tell you a procedure to break-in the piston rings (the only thing that matters).
The proper way to break in an engine is to drive at 30 mph and accelerate to 50 mph. Do this to break in the engine the proper way. Do this the first 3000 miles or so.
Manufactures are making engines with much higher tolerances today. Where cylinder clearances used to be in the thousands of an inch, now its in the ten thousands. Bores are rounder and straighter. There is know reason to baby a newer engine, it will actually hurt. You need cylinder pressure to drive the rings out onto the bore, which actually shaves the bore into a perfect fit. By babying it the rings will only rub and burnish the surface leaving a less then Ideal finish. So ... keep the revs below 4000 the first 300 miles, then drive it ... accelerate with meaning for the next 2500 miles and your all set. This is how all High Performance engines are broken in, and all engines today can be considered a high performance engine since they pull more power out then there predecessors ever did.
Most modern car engines are broken in at the factory, before assembly. Therefore the old tradition of breaking in a new car doesn't apply anymore. Just drive as you normally would drive and treat the car the way you would treat anything else of value.
that sounds like a great break-in procedue..... too bad prob 9 out of 10 cars are ran through the gears by some douche salesman or customer by the time we walk off the lot with one... unless you watched it get unloaded and immediately too it home, it was more than likely already rev'd past 3500rpms
 
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Most modern car engines are broken in at the factory, before assembly. Therefore the old tradition of breaking in a new car doesn't apply anymore. Just drive as you normally would drive and treat the car the way you would treat anything else of value.
Quite a read and some very good info, however this is the only part that is necessary.
 

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Do whatever makes you feel good. Some people drive it normal, some drive it like an old lady, and some people beat on it like it owes them money. This is like asking what is the best oil to use. You'll never get a good answer, but the owners manual is always a safe bet.

Me personally in the 15 or so years I've been in, around, working on, and designing engines, I have YET to see any type of longevity concern or failure that could be attributed due to an improper break in. At least on any modern, factory engine.....
 

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There are a few tips in the owner's manual in the intro section starting on page 16.
  • Don't drive at a constant speed in the first 1,000 miles
  • No wide open throttle before 100 miles
  • No towing or extreme performance before the first 1,000 miles
  • Do not add friction modifiers compounds or special break-in oils as these may prevent piston ring seating
  • Try not to continuously grin like an idiot
Okay, I made that last one up... Happy Motoring! :coolest
 

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Quite a read and some very good info, however this is the only part that is necessary.
Several people, myself included have experienced these new Mustangs using several quarts of oil over the first few thousand miles. In the past, this was always blamed on break-in, blow-by until the rings had seated, I believe. However, if these motors are broken in at the factory, what could explain the loss of oil that stops after a few thousand miles? I am very interested in your pro opinion on this.
 

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PS And oh yeah, congrats on the new GT, Tim! :bigthumbsup

Several people, myself included have experienced these new Mustangs using several quarts of oil over the first few thousand miles. In the past, this was always blamed on break-in, blow-by until the rings had seated, I believe. However, if these motors are broken in at the factory, what could explain the loss of oil that stops after a few thousand miles? I am very interested in your pro opinion on this.
From the little blurb in the owner's manual I more or less quoted above, it doesn't really sound like they are seated yet, hence the oil use some are seeing.
 

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PS And oh yeah, congrats on the new GT, Tim! :bigthumbsup



From the little blurb in the owner's manual I more or less quoted above, it doesn't really sound like they are seated yet, hence the oil use some are seeing.
:kooky:I guess we posted at the same time. That certainly does explain it.
 

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They are still broken in at the factory to some extent, usually in a "degreening" procedure. The necessity to perform special driving habits has all been negated nowadays, but it may still take some miles for the rings to FULLY seat. This is especially true in some diesel engines, where complete ring seating is not done until almost 10K miles at times. However, no special driving is required during that period. Just check the oil!
 

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I broke mine in at the dragstrip within a week of buying it. i dont use any oil and dont have any unusual noises. car runs flawlessly and has 2600 miles on it now. with new roller cams and the modern blueprinting that happens at the factory there really isnt a need to "break in the engine" like back in the old days. I build motors for my classic cars and i dont wait for any break in once i'm sure the rings are seated
 

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. i dont use any oil and dont have any unusual noises. car runs flawlessly and has 2600 miles on it now.
Man, with no oil, you're gonna start hearing some noises!:gringreen
 
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