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1967 Mercury Cougar XR7
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Sorry I didn't see this post sooner, Carson!

Hyper pistons are a poor choice if you can go with something else. They are brittle. If you make a mistake in tuning, they shatter, unlike forged pistons which tend to be lighter, and will deform before failing catastrophically. They are marginally better than cast, but if you're going 9/10 of the way, why not go the rest? Get some good Auto-tek or Icon flattops. Mahle if you can afford 'em! Then, you will have reduced drag from rings, and will be able to handle whatever you decide to do with your engine later.

I got mine along with a stroker crank (because my crank was damaged, and I had to bore my engine .030 anyway) from Clegg out in Utah. I was very impressed with their honesty, and they took the time to actually ask questions about how I was going to use the car before giving solid recommendations.

Make sure you get your engine balanced if you replace pistons. It's absolutely critical. And yes, stock bore is 4.0 inches, though if you're putting in new pistons, you probably want to bore it to clean things up. 4.010, 4.020, or 4.030 - whatever the smallest amount you can get away with, according to your machinist! There's no point in putting nice shiny new rings into old holes, or just scuffing them with a hone and not checking things. You want reliability, longevity and power.

Grats on your E7 heads! They'll do a little better without their bumps. Hopefully your friend knew what he was doing! =)
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Sorry I didn't see this post sooner, Carson!

Hyper pistons are a poor choice if you can go with something else. They are brittle. If you make a mistake in tuning, they shatter, unlike forged pistons which tend to be lighter, and will deform before failing catastrophically. They are marginally better than cast, but if you're going 9/10 of the way, why not go the rest? Get some good Auto-tek or Icon flattops. Mahle if you can afford 'em! Then, you will have reduced drag from rings, and will be able to handle whatever you decide to do with your engine later.

I got mine along with a stroker crank (because my crank was damaged, and I had to bore my engine .030 anyway) from Clegg out in Utah. I was very impressed with their honesty, and they took the time to actually ask questions about how I was going to use the car before giving solid recommendations.

Make sure you get your engine balanced if you replace pistons. It's absolutely critical. And yes, stock bore is 4.0 inches, though if you're putting in new pistons, you probably want to bore it to clean things up. 4.010, 4.020, or 4.030 - whatever the smallest amount you can get away with, according to your machinist! There's no point in putting nice shiny new rings into old holes, or just scuffing them with a hone and not checking things. You want reliability, longevity and power.

Grats on your E7 heads! They'll do a little better without their bumps. Hopefully your friend knew what he was doing! =)
Thanks for the advice. I was hoping hypers would do the job, and I'm happy I asked, so now I'll look for some forged pistons. I'll talk to the shop that I go to and see what is best for the the block. Another question I have is, can I get away with using my factory rods? I've got my cart pretty full on Summit, and would like to save some money. They've got about 95k miles on them, so if they're made of decent material and can withstand a little more power than factory, I hope to keep them.

And I trust my buddy that ported the E7 heads, he's an old guy that's been building Dodge big blocks forever. (Hopefully his skills were applicable to Fords, lol)
 

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Reconditioned factory rods usually work fine. They're not the 'weak point' in a factory Windsor. If you're not spinning past 6000 or so, I don't think I'd even invest in better fasteners - though that is typically the weak point for them at high RPMs. Those small rod bolts are light, which is good, but there's a reason that aftermarket rods use bigger ones. =)

Most pistons are all the same blanks, made by the same foundry, and then they get machined by the company that sells them. Auto Tec/Race Tec pistons, TRW, Icon, all the same basic foundation until they're trimmed and shaped to what the manufacturer wants. There is still significant difference in quality between them, and the type of rings they choose has a big part to play.

Mahle is a notable exception to this, and it's a big reason for why they are so light. They make their own.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Reconditioned factory rods usually work fine. They're not the 'weak point' in a factory Windsor. If you're not spinning past 6000 or so, I don't think I'd even invest in better fasteners - though that is typically the weak point for them at high RPMs. Those small rod bolts are light, which is good, but there's a reason that aftermarket rods use bigger ones. =)

Most pistons are all the same blanks, made by the same foundry, and then they get machined by the company that sells them. Auto Tec/Race Tec pistons, TRW, Icon, all the same basic foundation until they're trimmed and shaped to what the manufacturer wants. There is still significant difference in quality between them, and the type of rings they choose has a big part to play.

Mahle is a notable exception to this, and it's a big reason for why they are so light. They make their own.
Interesting. I didn't know that. She's a street car, so I don't really have to worry about high RPMs too much and I'll stick with the rods that I have. (My wallet just sighed with relief) I'm getting parts together and the teardown process is complete, so between work and life, the build process will be starting soon.
 
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