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Hello,

I need to change my spark plugs but I am too scared to do it on my own if there a big chance that it will break.. So... I was wondering if it would be okay to use lubrication like Deep Creep into the wells of the spark plug, wait overnight, and then drive the vehicle to a mechanic so that they can remove the plugs?
 

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yeah I think that is part of the recommended procedure to get them out without breaking . . . . except for the driving part; but I don't think there would be any issue as long as it is not spilling out and dripping on hot things like the exhaust manifold

there are some threads on here with the full details of the recommended procedure, spend a little time with the search feature and hopefully you can find them; and remember there are multiple forum sections to look in -- check the menu up top
 

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Although I did follow the most recent TSB, I also relied on my experience back in the 1970’s when aluminum heads & intake manifolds were just entering the street scene and never-seize did not exist. Here are the exceptions to the TSB that I did…

1. I ran Lucas fuel injection cleaner, mixed at 3 times their recommendation in 1 full tank of gasoline. Purpose…if I was lucky, it would dissolve or loosen any carbon buildup (although many do a real fuel injection cleaning also- and it is probably a best practice to do if you have more than 45-50,000 miles on the plugs)

2. Although I am a fan of PB Blaster, I used a product called ChemSearch “Yield”. The issue I have with using carb cleaner is the lack of lubrication…..in the old days of removing steel plugs from aluminum heads, we use to mix up acetone & ATF…or of we needed more lubrication, kerosene & ATF, “Yield” provides this lubrication- much better IMHO than even PB Blaster.

3. Yes, I put anti-seize on the plug threads (I know the TSB says not to)

4. Of course…a lot of patience, I really doubt if I ever put more than 20-25 lbs of force during removal (purposefully)
The end result, only one plug even “squeaked” coming out (but it basically unscrewed like a regular plug- literally). Plug #4 was initially a little stubborn, but after the second try, then waiting about 30 minutes, it came out with very little effort…just kept wiggling the plugs (tightening/loosening) by 1/8th or even less of a turn- and they all came out without a single one breaking or any issue really. Another technique that can definitely be used is to loosen the plugs about 1/8 to ¼ of a turn, start the engine for about 1 minute- this allows the flame to travel up around the plug to burn off the carbon, let cool, then remove with the process I previously described.

As far as using an air ratchet, I can understand the theory of “shocking” the carbon loose, but I have also seen and experienced in my younger days some real disasters.

Actual working time: 2 hours…..including washing my hands, total time was 5 hours.
 
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