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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally after getting yelled at by my friends for wanting to wash all my engine parts in the kitchen sink, and get every car part squeeky clean, I thought I came accross a part they wouldn't mind me getting wett, the radiator. Well even now I may be wrong as people tell me I should not pressure wash the radiator becauce I may damage the fins. So what's the verdict can I pressure wash a radiator or not?

By the way this is a radiator I picked up off of Craigslist for $20 bucks I know it's not a Mustang radiator, but it will work in the engine test stand, for extra credit can you guess what it is off of? Circa 1971.
 

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High pressure sprays like at a car wash can damage the fins before you even realize it has happened. Take it to a radiator shop for the best job.

Frank
 

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Pressure washers come with different pressure nozzles. Just be careful on the one you use. The highest pressure ones can put holes in them.
 

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looks like a mopar radiator, but i would NOT pressure wash it, it would destroy the fins like nothing else, look at what one tiny bug does to them, now think about all the pressure the water will have..
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
use elbow grease

Having heard a popuri of advice ranging from don't you dare, to it's ok, to use your judgement, I decided to clean it the old fashion way, with a bucket, brush, car wash soap, garden hose, and a can of elbow grease (not shown) below.

Please use caution as you clean 30 year old parts as you may find useful information lurking beneath the dirt and grime such as part numbers and covered up old repair work.

I learned that those pretty black radiators are actually yellowish brown brass underneath, yes call me dense but I knew the fins were aluminininum however I didn't know the bigger bits were brass. So the scraped nuggles paid for themselves on this one.

Here be some photographs:
 

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