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New member and i'm wondering how some of you have overcome the the fuel vapor in your lines on the very hot days? Have a friend with a 66 and every time he stops his Coupe it stalls with vapor lock. I usally lurk over at the Ford Barn as I have a 30 tudor as my second car. But I'm looking at another 66 thats in the neighborhood thats for sale. Does anyone have some answers? Thanks a bunch.----bert, fl.
 

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Welcome lets try your question in here.
 

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Looks like I goofed right at the start. hope this works. Thanks Jim. A friend has a 66 and when ever he comes to a stop the engin quits. Vapor lock caused by heat caused by we think the 10% alcolhol in the fuel. Is there someone out there that has had this problem and found the solution? 66 6cy. auto. Tried the clothes pins. aluminum foil, no help. Is there a remidy other than electric fuel pump? thanks bunches if you can help.----bert, fl.
 

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Try using the product Sta-Bil. Add it to your car when you fill up. I have used this fuel stabilizer and had good luck with it. They sell it at most auto parts stores.
 

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I have never had a problem but i run a inline pump and braided lines.A fuel stabilizer might help only thing i can tell you is run a cab spacer and keep the fuel lines as far away from heat as you can.
 

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With or without ethanol the gas today is more volatile than it was in the 60s; a higher vapor pressure is the technical term. Nearly any US gas today will have ethanol and its going to have more of it unless a new congress is elected. Any system which has no return line to the tank, like the Mustang, is vulnerable to vapor lock. With a single fuel line going only to the engine the fuel in the line can boil and the pump becomes useless. The fuel will not make it to the engine so nothing you do there will have much affect. With the engine running, new cooler fuel helps keep the problem under control but shutting off the engine, or ever idling, allows the fuel in the carb and line to warm. Fuel stabilizer is intended to prevent chemical decomposition over long storage periods and has little, if anything, to do with vapor pressure.

If the fuel is already in the carb and boiling then that is not technically vapor lock. The V8 stock air cleaner intentionally draws in heated air from the exhaust manifold to keep the intake charge at 100F. The carb also sits on a manifold heated by exhaust gas. Both of those were to vaporize the fuel more fully and with today's fuel may be overkill.

Locally we have had 10% ethanol gas in the winter for years but its less of a problem in the cooler winter. Ethanol is now there year round. Personally, my 100% stock '66 Mustangs (both 289s) don't have a problem with the 10% ethanol we now see. In other cars I have had to install an electric fuel pump at the tank to push fuel forward. If the pump isn't sucking on the fuel line then there will be no vapor lock. That solved the problem completely on those cars. An electric pump at the front will still have to suck on the line and would still have vapor lock problems.
 
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