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I replaced my Brembo front rotors/pads a couple of years ago with AutoZone Premium (Gold I think) Pads, and generic 14” Rotors. I’ve had no particular problems with them but I think it’s that time again.

I already have the EBC Yellow-stuff pads, but I’m not thrilled with the rotors I currently have. They’ve developed some grooves and seem softer than the original Brembo rotors. I suppose I could find a place with a brake lathe, and have them turned, but I want something that either equals or betters the Brembo rotors.
Are the EBC rotors listed below an upgrade over the Brembo, or do the at least match them (regarding hardness & durability?

Input from anyone will be considered, but I’d like some feedback from EBC about the rotors listed below.
Product Font Automotive tire Screenshot Auto part
 

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Your AFM Administrator Excellency, LOL

I wish to offer my opinion in your loyal & faithful service.
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You cannot go wrong with EBC rotors. They are a global powerhouse of brake parts based in the United Kingdom. They have a huge market for European cars (VW, Audi, BMW, Porsche, MB, Peugeot, Mini and more) and are also cranked up for the entire USA market. They're ISO certified and their two plants are in the UK and USA. You would almost certainly get a set made in the USA. They would not dominate the European market if they weren't great. That's a good price too.
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The one other recommendation I would make is StopTech (Centric). They are a US company based in California and all their parts are made in California. To me, they tend to be more of a slotted, cross-drilled racing / performance / boutique brand. In other words, overkill for ordinary driving. I've got slotted & cross-drilled StopTech biggies on all 4 corners and love them. They are more expensive. They are cheese grater chewing through my pads with zero grooving.

HTH!!!!!
Andy
 

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I don't know much about the EBC rotors, but they do look good in the picture and the description, and Andy's comments seem on point.

Centric have served me well, and I think they do offer "premium" coated rotors, which are well worth the few extra dollars, in my budget. Pretty sure you can find them on Rock Auto.
 
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IMHO....

I would avoid any EBC products like the plague. This link gives an excellent example of the Q/A issues they have and the Tech information they are mandated to give but refuse to....to this day! Centric is another company which I would avoid their products when possible....... Just because any company is ISO certified, that only means they have a written QA standard and they have SOP's in writing and they follow that...... nothing more, nothing less.

Well,, let me tell you my experience and give some personal opinion as well....I'm right down here in Los Angeles and Centric's facility is close by.

In 2017 my wife's 1997 Cougar Sport was due for brakes (4 wheel disc) and was still running the original oem calipers. Although they were working fine, no leaks, etc., I figured I should rebuild/replace because of their age. I initially was going to rebuild them myself, but after researching, I went with Centric Calipers. Fit and finish was fine, what wasn't good was as I hooked up the brake lines, the new copper crush washers (which appeared to be aluminum), leaked like a uncorked garden hose...and could not get it to stop. All the castings initially looked fine, but upon closer review one of the castings had an obvious flaw that was not addressed during their ISO 9001 inspection process whereby the there was no way it could seal. I had two NOS copper crush washers sitting around and replaced those on the fronts.....worked like charm, but no-one had any in stock.

I called Centric direct and advised them of the issue, they insisted the crush washers were copper with an aluminum coating over it (well, not what I saw), but they wanted to swap out my rear calipers...I requested they include real-old fashion copper crush washers- they agreed....returned the calipers to the parts house, advised them of the situation......received my new ones that afternoon.....they worked perfect......IMHO, if you go with Centric, buy a pack of copper crush washers 1st.

While they do come "painted", it's so thin, they didn't last 1 month before surface rust started forming......I ended up buying rustoleum caliper paint and hand painting them- on the car (oh that was fun)....so plan on painting them also prior to install.

IMHO, although I do give credit to Centirc for effectively addressing the issue, next time I would just buy the caliper rebuild kit including a new piston...... yeah, almost the cost of new but the amount of time I spent on these, I would have been done in 1 day instead of day 2 and right the 1st time.... not the 3rd.

With regards to rotors...

With regards to rotors, I have previously run Brembo OEM replacement rotors that are cryogenically treated at Diversified Cryogenics, making them almost as hard as stainless steel. Unfortunately, Brembo, Powerslot, Raybestos, Bendix, Hawk etc. (mostly) are all purchasing their rotors from the same foundary (2 to be precise) in China (with the exception of the $300 each composite high end units for Ferrari, Porsche, etc).

DC purchases the highest grade rotors made, laser mic them for quality, scrap the ones that are out of spec and cryogenically treat the good ones which are now as strong as stainless. They will also slot and cross drill the rotors for you. DC's service, price and quality are excellent as well.

The staff at DC and CarboTech (for brake linings) are used extensively in street and racing environments... and can speak to you as well regarding those options, but I am very satisfied with the performance & wear of these products.
 
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^^ this above is flat out WRONG ^^

I'm a mechanical and petroleum engineer from the University of California @ Berkeley and spent 30 yrs in industry where we were dealing with operating temps >2000F, operating pressures >20,000 psi, and flow rates > 2000 gallons per minute.

Achieving ISO standard verification is absolutely NOT simply a matter of having crappy paperwork.

Engineering design(s) have to be reviewed by accredited engineering experts - this is a prestigious responsibility by the way as an engineer.

Then, your written procedure(s) for supply chain control, mill specs, random sample measurement and more, have to be accredited by an expert auditor and numerous technical writers.

But, in reality, nobody cares about the written stuff.

THEN and ONLY THEN to do ISO certified agents proceed to audit, witness, and critique the actual manufacturing process and destructive laboratory testing of produced parts to ensure they meet design criteria.

If you receive an ISO authentic part and it fails, you are the problem. Not the part.
 
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^^ this above is flat out WRONG ^^

I'm a mechanical and petroleum engineer from the University of California @ Berkeley and spent 30 yrs in industry where we were dealing with operating temps >2000F, operating pressures >20,000 psi, and flow rates > 2000 gallons per minute.

Achieving ISO standard verification is absolutely NOT simply a matter of having crappy paperwork.

Engineering design(s) have to be reviewed by accredited engineering experts - this is a prestigious responsibility by the way as an engineer.

Then, your written procedure(s) for supply chain control, mill specs, random sample measurement and more, have to be accredited by an expert auditor and numerous technical writers.

But, in reality, nobody cares about the written stuff.

THEN and ONLY THEN to do ISO certified agents proceed to audit, witness, and critique the actual manufacturing process and destructive laboratory testing of produced parts to ensure they meet design criteria.

If you receive an ISO authentic part and it fails, you are the problem. Not the part.
I appreciate your credentials, however, you forget "Part B"..... let's say your QA process requires a spec of "X", which must be obtained for the part to pass QA.... ok, that's all great, but your spec that is based upon a risk analysis allowing a 1% failure rate at the customer level. Heck I have seen ISO facilities (overseas) with a QA acceptable failure schedule of 15% (at the customer level, products received here in the US)

I agree with you, that much of the time, when there is failure analysis, it is predominantly a "Bone-head' person with authority causing the issue (such as when GM purchased HAC and with Roger Smith at the helm, numerous executives went to federal prison for falsifying documents impacting critical 75 government program) , however, the ISO documentation can allow this as "acceptable" for failure because the cost of reducing the failure far exceeds the product value and is validated through both qualitative & quantitative analysis and addressed by 1 or more of the following means (terminology varies with each industry)...

Risk Acceptance (We will accept a $1M hit)
Risk Avoidance (We will employ processes to avoid those elements of risk that push our liability over $1M)
Risk Reduction (We will employ processes to reduce all risk over $1M)
Risk Transfer (We will either outsource the risk and/or buy liability insurance to cover everything over $1M)

Are you still an ISO facility- Yes

Chevron USA as an example follows this exact "model"..... I recently sued them and won for selling "non-servicable" gasoline in my car. Was I the only one...... no....aircraft was fueled with water-contaminated fuel at San Jose, Sacramento International & Sac Metro airports from multiple Chevron sources. Pipelines in Santa Monia leaked for many years contaminating 80% of the drinking water sources.... costing Chevron $200M for a treatment center plus reimbursing the City of SM for all the water they had to purchase for 10+ years (IIRR) from outside sources. Yet as you say, the much of the oil/gas industry is/has/operates ISO certified facilities. and yes, I have worked specifically in the OIl/Gas/Energy industry in this aspect.

Yes, I also have an upper level degree
Yes, I also have spent 30+ years actually testing plans, policies and procedures for certification in a variety of industries both domestic & abroad, in government and NGO venues.
Yes, when I was employed at Hughes Aircraft Company (HAC), I graduated from the joint HAC Learning Center/UCLA Anderson School of Business management program (which included ISO, QA, TQM, TQM, MDC, SE.... I could go on) and my mentor was the VP, HAC Space & Communications Group (today aka Boeing Defense, Space & Security).
 

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The fact that EBC states the specific alloy metal that the rotors are cast from is only a good thing and promising imo. It's stated that they're cast from G3000 iron. That's very specific and if they're advertising it then that would make me feel more secure in having them on my car. I loved the rotors and pads I bought from EBC for my old 1991 GT.
I'm thinking that the Advance brand rotors are probably made from nothing more than the cheapest chinese iron that could barely pass for use as rotors. That would explain why they developed grooves. I've read stories about chinese steel products being shipped over to the USA and likely everywhere else as not coming close to meeting the specifications required. I'm betting that this is a rampant practice in China. I remember one story about large structure I-beams for a building not passing strength/hardness testing before installation. They were too soft/weak and had to be discarded.
I would hazard a guess that the Advance brand pads also wouldn't meet the quality level of most name brand stuff out there. Though I admit that I've bought them before for daily drivers myself.
Sometimes generic brand products or name brand products bought at large corporate retailers are made by an established company but the quality control and composition is usually less than what you would get from that company's name branded boxed stuff bought elsewhere. This is definitely the way it is in the construction/building industry at least and I can guarantee that this is also the case in many other industries.
 

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"Yet as you say, the much of the oil/gas industry is/has/operates ISO certified facilities."

NOPE, never said that. Some of our C1 equipment (C1equipment = we had to have a preserved spare enclosed in a nitrogen blanket within 24 hrs of the facility) was ISO certified, but our floating production installations offshore and refineries were not.

Agree with you on this : RISK = FREQUENCY x CONSEQUENCE

Won't say who I worked for, but we abhorred the thought of the incident that happened once every 10 years or so but killed 10 people.

Without being insensitive, this is like the airline industry. If the baggage handler cuts his thumb, or puts a conveyor belt in a 9 line bind and causes a 20 min flight delay, that "consequence" is zero in terms of life.

If the plane crashes because of a latent conditions with 'angle of attack' sensors (hello Boeing 737-8Max) , that is different. (Yeah, I'm a licensed pilot)

CHEERS!
 
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