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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I have a '98 GT w/ 47,000 Miles on it. I noticed over the past few winters that when the engine is cold and I start the car I get a clanking sound coming from the engine for no longer than 2 seconds. It almost sounds like a bunch of marbles bouncing around in the engine. The only time I hear the noise is on start up. The engine sounds and runs fine after I hear the noise. It only seems to do it in the winter....it doesn't do it in the summer. I am using 5w-30 Valvaline Durablend and a Motorcraft filter. Any Idea's on what this noise is and how to get rid of it? Any input would be much appreciated.
Thanks
 

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hmmmmm...clanking sound. It sounds to me like there's some wear ocuring in the of the motor either in the cylinders or in the bottom end bearings. The sound may be happening when it's really cold and the the tolerances between bearings or cylinder rings are opened up until oil gets in there and some heat builds to close them up. Keep a close eye on your oil usage, if it gets higher than 1 quart every 1000 miles, it's time to start looking into some engine work. Get a compression test done, those results will shed more light on the issue. If the test reveals that you aren't holding good compression then it may be time to start looking into engine work sooner rather than later.
 

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This sounds normal to me. When it is cold outside, engine oil is very thick and reaches the moving parts of your engine at a slower speed than during warm weather. So for 2 seconds, you have no oil in your valvetrain and it makes some noise becuase of this. I wouldn't worry about it too much.
 

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Also, might want to go back to 5W-20. The 20 is the weight that the oil acts like when it is cold wich is a little thinner that the 30. The engine might have a little problem getting the 30 weight to flow into the bearings.
 

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jjandascog said:
Also, might want to go back to 5W-20. The 20 is the weight that the oil acts like when it is cold wich is a little thinner that the 30. The engine might have a little problem getting the 30 weight to flow into the bearings.

No, 5 is the weight of the oil when it is cold. 20 is the warm viscosity.
 

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Monkey Boy said:
No, 5 is the weight of the oil when it is cold. 20 is the warm viscosity.
Monkey Boy is right.

It's the first number, the 5.
So if you really want to do something about cold start and fast lubrication go with a 0W-XX. During winter time I always used a 0W-40 in my chipped Saab AERO, but during summer time I used 5W-50.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
engineer76 said:
So if you really want to do something about cold start and fast lubrication go with a 0W-XX.
So basically, if I go with a 0w-30 I will get the same protection when the engine warms up as I would with the 5w-30? Also, if I use 5w-20 then I will see no difference and could possible still get the noise on cold start?
 

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65melstang98 said:
So basically, if I go with a 0w-30 I will get the same protection when the engine warms up as I would with the 5w-30? Also, if I use 5w-20 then I will see no difference and could possible still get the noise on cold start?
Pretty much!

The problem with the 0W-XX is that a any motor is designed for a specivic viscosity. If you use to thin of an oil in a very high mileage motor, it will just get burnt. (Example: A seventies Chevy 350, 250K miles, never been rebuilt -> it would go thru a 0W-XX oil like a football player through water on a hot summer day)
The problem is mainly the cylinder to piston clearance. If the bore gets larger, and the surface has a couple of scars from wear, oil is more likely to pass by the rings and it gets burnt. The larger the clearances in a motor are, the higher voscosity you want to use.

Keep in mind that using a lower viscosity oil does not eliminate the problem, it just reduces the time for the oil to get through the passages.

One very important number, which has not been mentionned in this thrad before is the pour point. It tells you how cold oil has to be, to not be pourable any more - the lower, the better.

Get your own oppinion and ave a look at this sheet:
http://www.amsoil.com/performancetests/g1971/index.aspx
 

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No, 5 is the weight of the oil when it is cold. 20 is the warm viscosity.
Dang it, long day suffering from head-up-a** syndrome
 
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