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Discussion Starter #1
My parents recently gave me my first car, a 1964 1/2 mustang! It is everything I wanted (I am interseted in fixing up cars) and I have already had many people too and talk to me about it. Obviously there are some problems with it and me benign a DIY person, I'm sure there is tons of improvements that I can make to it.
As I said it is a 1964 1/2 hardtop with a 200 ci I6 3 speed manual. It has a rebuilt carbereutor and the guy I bought it from put in a new AC unit, so he installed a bigger fan.
It runs well but the shifting is hard to manage (it isn't easy to tell 1st from the 3rd gear and hard to find neutral) and you have to push the clutch about a foot in. The headliner is sagging and I couldn't find any fixes online ( except for one guy poked a hole in it, attached an adhesive spray bottle to a straw, sprayed it 360 around, and stuck it back up). The rubber linings are all old and need to be replaced as can be expected. And the radio and sound systems are old and something I would like to replace.
Any extra safety features I can install relatively cheaply are things im looking for.
And finally I want to increase the mpg, acceleration, cornering, etc. with installments that aren't impossible for me ( and my dad).
Any tips or improvements on my new car are greatly appreciated!
 

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It is a little unfair that you ask so many direct repair fixes in a talk forum post. Each of your questions has specific fixes.

When these cars were made, the term 'sound system' was simply called a radio.

And what 'rubber linings' are you talking about?

I will reply to a few more general items. Safety: put in 3 point seat belts and seats from a newer Mustang with the higher backs. Mechanical upgrades: PS, power disc brakes up front, and replace all the front suspension bushings.

All the fix items, you really do need to have separate post in the tech forum.
 

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Make a prioritized list of everything that needs to be fixed. Look up in the forum each item to see if the answer is already here. Develop a budget of time and money. Don't skimp on tools, but don't overspend either.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ok, thanks, I'll do that with the repairs, but I guess what I really want to know is what modifications I can make. Things that aren't needed to drive the car. In example my dad suggested electronic ignition.
 

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I'm not going to reiterate what driveway said because he said some ideas. Headliner, buy a new one. Don't poke a hole and put adhesive. Do it the right way. Do research on electronic ignition. I put a ready to run msd distributor in mine and had no problems for the last 5 years so far. If you're into an aftermarket radio, buy the single din or install your radio in the glove box like some people do. But a single din looks better. Also, you never mentioned what kind of budget you are. Some like to go extreme. I like to go semi-extreme since I've replaced all my suspension, rear end upgrades, etc. more in there future. But some wants to just replace old parts with new. Let us know how much you plan to spend.

Moderator, please move this to tech section. Thanks.
 

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Ok, thanks, I'll do that with the repairs, but I guess what I really want to know is what modifications I can make. Things that aren't needed to drive the car. In example my dad suggested electronic ignition.
Hi!

Lets talk about points in general...

Ignition points are extremely reliable, easy to set and require no adjustment when properly set/installed. Yes you can hear people state "It runs so much smoother/better than when it had points"........in each case that an individual said that in my presence, they had very little knowledge about points and the ones they were running were- old & tired or inexpensive aftermarket replacement units or the individual (including professional mechanic) was unfamiliar with not just setting the gap to OEM specs, but setting the dwell & initial timing to what the engine likes.

But let’s look at the OEM ignition system from the early 60’s….
Original Coil Voltage: 20,000; by the end of the 60’s 40,000 volt high performance coils were common…..by the 70’s 50,000 & 60,000 volt coils were easily available & is what we have today. Did we really gain all sorts of HP/TQ with all this extra voltage…….no, what we were able to gain was stronger support (if you will excuse my terms here) for higher RPM’s- specifically in the 6,000+ range…..enough to power NASCAR engines in the 8,000 rpm range at 200+ mph!

Points were used in NASCAR up through the late 1970's, running speeds of 200mph+.........Cale Yarborough did lose a race one time because the ignition points broke. In a street application, if you look at the data very closely that is provided by these more common e-box companies, in street applications (where max power-band RPM is around 6000), when the standard dyno deviation is removed (5% standard per every dyno mfg) there is less than 1% improvement in performance. Further testing by independent aftermarket DIS (direct ignition system) manufacturers verify this through their own testing- there is little gain over an ignition points system until you reach 4000 rpm…then you begin to see a slight sustainment of ignition delivery above what points can deliver but it doesn’t even begin to compare to what a “modern”, real e-based system can & does deliver in a real world street (and race) environment.
I am not promoting this product but their analysis is very demonstrative of actual performance results. link: http://www.compu-tronix.com/MightyMo...risonGraph.pdf
The other item is, in a street vehicle, if you wait to see improvement until 4000+ rpm, the race is over.
Here is a link to a back to back ¼ runs- comparison of points vs a couple of e-box conversions……..no discernible difference PerTronix Track Test

These e-box “conversion kits” have literally the same design limitations as the “conventional points”- because they are essentially using the same delivery system (rotor, cap, wires, etc.) and they are subject to the same inherent design impactors of which there are numerous….including ozone that is produced within the cap…..none of this has by miracle “disappeared” and in fact when compared in true recorded data-frame analysis, the benefit will be gone by 5800 rpm and the loss, although slightly less, parallels that of points. In racing conditions that could very well make a difference, but in a street application, you could literally change brand of fuel and see that level of improvement or degradation. Additionally, there are companies such as ProComp whose “High-Tech Multiple Discharge Ignition Systems” are nothing more than re-boxed low tech conversion parts purchased in bulk from other companies- mostly Chinese-based. Check out this pic procomp ignition box?? of a “new” ProComp e-ignition system- it’s a glued together GM part stuffed into a pretty aluminum box. Considering they were sued in 2006 by MSD (and prohibited as part of a settlement from using/distributing any of their parts), I’m not surprised by anything I see with their crap….but this includes much of the e-box aftermarket industry- a lot of PR documents which physics does not play any part!

Very good quality ignition points/condensors are available (such as Blue streak) and when set properly, are very reliable and provide excellent performance. There have been no less than 5 people who I personally knew were going to get e-boxes, then I had them get a good set of points/condenser, a high voltage (40k+) coil, and installed them showing them specifically how to do it......the engines ran smooth and strong. One person did end up buying an e-box, why, because he said he just got tired of not being "cool", after spending $500 for a distributor, etc (he went “Popular” high end), a year later (when he asked me to help him fix something) he admitted, it was a waste of $...it didn't run any better than after we put the points in.

While many state the positives of e-boxes (and there are certainly many positive attributes), there are conditions which reduce an e-boxes effectiveness & reliability....to start with the circuitry and handling (container vessel shipping) of it from China (which is where 90% of the more common/popular e-box company's products originate). Any aspect including temperature control, static safeguards, moisture can & will cause both detectable and undetectable damage which may not show up until after you have subjected the installed component to real world vibrations, heat, cold, moisture & grease/oil. Yes, all of these damage e-components, but the systems (based upon a variety of factors) are suppose to be prepared to endure these exposures but that is based upon many, many assumptions. Including proper handling & q/a.......given all of the 3rd party involvement in the final product, it is unrealistic (IMHO) to believe that e-boxes have an increased reliability as compared to their mechanical-based counterpart. And in terms of “Dwell Control” I won’t even go into that in detail but I will say, what the “kits” provide is a joke…..you can actually get more control over the dwell by having an understanding of how to set timing versus dwell setting with points than the most popular e-box conversion kits can provide…..which makes for a very smooth running engine- this is not just IMHO, but well known among the "higher quality" aftermarket engineers whose systems reflect this ability to "tune"!
If you need to say I got rid of my points…ok, that’s fine, but if you are really serious about actually upgrading the ignition system then do so……although it has been scrapped by the OEM’s in favor of more advanced, effective systems, there are aftermarket DIS units (yes the same as Ford used in the 90’s & developed by Porsche in the 80’s) whose cost is within reach of most buyers and will actually perform as stated.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry it took this long to reply, but my budget is 2.500 total. At the moment im thinking about electronic ignition like to said, headers, and new shocks and struts but I can't exactly tell how much of a difference replacing the shocks will make
 

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Sorry it took this long to reply, but my budget is 2.500 total. At the moment im thinking about electronic ignition like to said, headers, and new shocks and struts but I can't exactly tell how much of a difference replacing the shocks will make
With a $2500 budget you may want to consider an electronic conversion kit for your distributor instead of purchasing a complete electronic ignition because you'll blow through nearly half your budget on the distributor alone. Trust me I'm on a budget as well and I plan on getting the conversion kit. Its a simple plug and play electronic replacement of your condenser and points which are a b**** to set to begin with.

Being that you have an I6 you're looking at about $400 to $500 for the distributor plus you'll need the MSD box, new coil.... it will add up quickly verse the $80 conversion kit available through Summit at:

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/pnx-1261
 

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Sorry it took this long to reply, but my budget is 2.500 total. At the moment im thinking about electronic ignition like to said, headers, and new shocks and struts but I can't exactly tell how much of a difference replacing the shocks will make
I did the Pertronix I electronic ignition conversion and the Scarbird disc brake conversion on my 66 I6 and am very pleased with both :bigthumbsup.
 

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I assume rubber linings you probably mean the gaskets: windows, doors,wind lace?
To do the head liner you will have to remove both from and back windshield, which it sounds will be good because then you can replace both gaskets and wind lace and gaskets around the doors. It's not a terrible job just take your time and have the right tools. You must have the windshield tool that releases the clips behind the chrome strips or you will tear those up and that can be costly.
 

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I would not waste any money on an ignition box. Total waste of money for unrealized performance. I know a guy who runs a 10 second drag car on stock ignition.


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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The headliner is a simple system of 4 bent metal rods that stretch across the roof from each side structure. These rods go inside cloth tubes about an inch high that are sewn into the seams on the back of the headliner. The upward arch of the rods hold the headliner up. The glue at the front and back windows hold the headliner and therefore the rods in place.

A sagging headliner most likely is caused by the cloth tube coming off the rod due to age. It could be the rod came out of the hole in the side, but not likely.

I would pull down the windlace where the sag is and peal back the side of the headliner and look inside.

If the cloth tube is torn (from rubbing on the roof) you might be able to loop some small zip ties thru the cloth and over the rod. This is a shoddy fix, but will buy you some time. Headliners are cheap, the install is a lot of work or some more cash.
 

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Welcome to the world of classic Mustangs. My first car was a 65 convertible with I6 3 speed. My dad and I spent hours working on mine and that's how I learned to work on cars. I have read several places that the stock shifter is a good one and a simple rebuild kit will greatly improve it. I am on my 3rd one now over the years and wish I had kept that first one. I sold it because it had rust and was too slow. In those days there was literally nothing you could do to them but now there are choices.

Here are a couple sights that I have found that you might want to look at if you haven't already.

Classic Inlines Performance Parts - Home
Clifford Performance :: Make 6 = 8
 
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