Ford Mustang Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hi, first time poster and first time on the site. I have this 1968 mustang that has been sitting in my gramps backyard. I asked him if I could have it if I fix it just to see what he would say....and he said yea. So, that got my hopes up and I took off the tarp and have no idea how viable the car is. I have plenty of time to work on it myself and I have some mechanical know how. I have changed my own struts, clutch, head gaskets, brake lines, struts, brakes for example...so I have a little bit of knowledge. It just seems like a lot and I am looking for recommendations for those with more experience where I should start and if I should start at all. Also the front end got bent in bit in a accident which makes it a salvage title. I have attached some pictures. Tell me what you think and thanks for the help.
Tire Car Wheel Plant Sky Tire Automotive tire Motor vehicle Tread Wheel Car Tire Vehicle Hood Wheel Wheel Tire Vehicle Combat vehicle Self-propelled artillery Automotive tire Motor vehicle Hood Automotive lighting Bumper Hood Motor vehicle Car Vehicle Automotive design
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,451 Posts
Welcome and thank you for joining ALLFORDMUSTANGS!
Please read the Site Rules if you haven’t already.
We encourage you to complete your Account Settings.
Do you need help posting? Please read this FAQ.

We’re happy you have chosen to be a part of our community.

It’s a bit much for a first timer. I’m not saying you can’t do it, but I’d probably pass on this as a full on project. Find another car (in better shape), and put some of the good parts from Grandpa’s car, onto it instead. That way, you transfer some sentimental value and have something better to work with.
 

·
Registered
07 Mustang GT
Joined
·
864 Posts
Well it's not a car for the faint of heart or pocket book. Do you have disposable cash laying around to buy parts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It’s a bit much for a first timer. I’m not saying you can’t do it, but I’d probably pass on this as a full on project. Find another car (in better shape), and put some of good parts from Grandpa’s car, onto it instead. That way, you transfer some sentimental value and have something better to work with.
Thank you for the advice and could be a possible avenue!

Well it's not a car for the faint of heart or pocket book. Do you have disposable cash laying around to buy parts?
Definitely not for the faint of heart and I have some disposable income laying around but I am unsure how to start or the best method to the madness. Do I strip the car to its frame and take care of some of the rust and fix the damaged frame in the front first and if so what would be the best way to do that. What do you think the cost would be just to get it rolling again? Thank you for the help!
 

·
Registered
1967 Mercury Cougar XR7
Joined
·
2,823 Posts
The bad news is that it's in pretty rough shape. The good news is, virtually all of the parts are readily available! I'd pull the carpets and check out the floorboards before deciding whether to jump in with both feet. Obviously the nose is a bit boogered up and missing some parts, but from what I see, it doesn't look too rusty, so that's good!

To literally get it running, you could get a junkyard 5.0 or 351 for as little as $1000 (including a new intake carb, distributor, and all the minor fixit parts you might need). Then you could throw some Dynacorn body parts on it, rebuild the C4, get brakes done, and be driving around for maybe 5k?

Paint, interior, and all that though? Easily another 5-20k.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,193 Posts
The 302 looks intact so like asked above if it ran and moved under it's own power before it was parked is a big expense and effort question.
You'll spend more than $5k on that to get it at a running and rolling minimum to drive though. The body and any possible needed frame rail work alone will exceed that amount. You need a shop to straighten and replace what's bent first and then you can get to buying fenders, hood, nose parts, etc. You need a new radiator support and it looks like both fender aprons as well. If the subframe rails are bent all that needs to be straightened and fixed before doing anything at all with reassembly.
The interior is pretty rough but it looks complete. You absolutely need a new dash pad and carpet.
From what can be seen in the pics it does look very rust free so that's a huge plus for the car but it's a manual brake coupe and not a well optioned fastback or convertible so it's likely not ever going to command a high dollar amount when resold. That should also be put into the equation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,856 Posts
You have a major project on your hands. You'll need a two car garage, one spot for the car and the second for all the parts that you have to take off of it. 5 years DIY labor and probably $20k minimum.
 

·
Headquarters
Joined
·
309 Posts
If you have deep pockets, sure. It'll make the entire family happy. But the amount of restoration ain't for the faint-hearted. Best of luck! And bring a lot of patience along 🤩
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Hi, first time poster and first time on the site. I have this 1968 mustang that has been sitting in my gramps backyard. I asked him if I could have it if I fix it just to see what he would say....and he said yea. So, that got my hopes up and I took off the tarp and have no idea how viable the car is. I have plenty of time to work on it myself and I have some mechanical know how. I have changed my own struts, clutch, head gaskets, brake lines, struts, brakes for example...so I have a little bit of knowledge. It just seems like a lot and I am looking for recommendations for those with more experience where I should start and if I should start at all. Also the front end got bent in bit in a accident which makes it a salvage title. I have attached some pictures. Tell me what you think and thanks for the help.
View attachment 781948 View attachment 781949 View attachment 781950 View attachment 781951 View attachment 781952 View attachment 781953
OK it is a bit of a project, but as one poster said the parts are readily available I would not change the engine if I could help it. It would destroy the collectability. restore it and depending how good a job you do you could have a car worth between $21 and $30k. You main asset is you have time to do it. Want o really have a blast ask gramps to help you he would probably be honored and it will keep him young. As one poster said first check the floorboards then straighten what needs to be straightened then get the engine running. You need a new dash, you can replace all the interior parts yourself. I have resorted and modified many cars. You can even read some books, watch some youtube videos and learn how to paint it yourself, Even if it never gets sold for top dollar there's this awesome feeling when someone says; "Nice car" and you say "Thanks I restored it myself " The look on the other guys face makes it worth it. Then they start asking what you did and how you did it. It's a cool feeling. You will definitely get at least what you put into it. Attached is a picture of my latest project. Started a a plain old 2014 premium convertible. I did everything myself, took 6 months on and off. Mines the blue one. The lady is my mom she was 100 there and used to help pick out the parts and polish it. She passed at 101 in 2019 active till the end. Loved her dearly.
Wheel Land vehicle Car Vehicle Tire
Tableware Photograph Purple Human Fashion Wheel Tire Car Land vehicle Vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
It looks like this is going to have to go on a frame machine to get straightened out before anything else since the front end is twisted and you don't know how far that goes through the rest of the car. I'd probably get it up on jack stands and have a look underneath to see how rusted it is too as rotted torque boxes and the cowl area are quite common on first gen Mustangs. It's not for the faint of heart but if you are looking to possibly make a career of auto body restoration it might be worth it as a learning experience but it's going to be an expensive lesson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
While the tie into your grandfather is nice, the car appears to be a pretty standard notch back coupe. If this was an early 428 CJ or a J Code 302 in a fastback body you might consider spending the amount of time and money to bring it back from the dead, but it isn't either of those. Find yourself a nice driver quality '68 coupe and use grampa's car as a parts source so that some of his old beast is still with you. The car you show in the pictures is clearly a parts car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
I think that would be a nice project car for learning. Looks rust free and seems like all the engine and compartment parts are still there and original. Sure the front end has damage but all sheet metal should be available and the op could probably find a basic body work night coarse and apply it to fixing the car. Also good if all the interior is intack. How fancy the restoration needs to be would be up to what the pocket book could tolerate of coarse. People luckily, nowadays, have cell phones that takes hundreds of pictures at no cost and thousands of internet videos showing repair techniques.
If you do start, make sure you bag and name everything you take off so all bolts and fasteners go back to original locations. You may notice some of the bolts have different markings on the head which will help later in reassembly. For example, intake manifold bolts may have a triangle mark on the head of all the bolts no matter what the length of the bolt and valve cover bolts may have 2 marks or a star.
Everything is dependent on a strong foundation so, before you start, get the car on a hoist and have the body structure assessed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,856 Posts
One good thing about working on a wreck (like mine was) is that the term "restomod" is encouraged. A common upgrade to this model is a front subframe and coil-overs. It stiffens the chassis and makes a ton of room in the stock engine bay. It would also eliminate any issues with that crash damaged front subframe.
 

·
Headquarters
Joined
·
309 Posts
One good thing about working on a wreck (like mine was) is that the term "restomod" is encouraged. A common upgrade to this model is a front subframe and coil-overs. It stiffens the chassis and makes a ton of room in the stock engine bay. It would also eliminate any issues with that crash damaged front subframe.
Restomod opens up a lot of possibilities. Plenty of research about these mods go a long way too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Hi, first time poster and first time on the site. I have this 1968 mustang that has been sitting in my gramps backyard. I asked him if I could have it if I fix it just to see what he would say....and he said yea. So, that got my hopes up and I took off the tarp and have no idea how viable the car is. I have plenty of time to work on it myself and I have some mechanical know how. I have changed my own struts, clutch, head gaskets, brake lines, struts, brakes for example...so I have a little bit of knowledge. It just seems like a lot and I am looking for recommendations for those with more experience where I should start and if I should start at all. Also the front end got bent in bit in a accident which makes it a salvage title. I have attached some pictures. Tell me what you think and thanks for the help.
View attachment 781948 View attachment 781949 View attachment 781950 View attachment 781951 View attachment 781952 View attachment 781953
Cool first timer project if you have 10 yrs and the $$ to do a full on restore. It's a bit gone for just a fixer upper. Don't waste your time. Use it as a learner, get the thing running....use it as a tool to get yourself acquainted with the technology on a old mustang. Have fun.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top