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I come from the world of Jeep off-roading, so I know what a differential locker is, and what a limited slip diff is, and also I know a little bit about the Traction Control in our VW Passat wagon - its an independent computer-controlled wheel braking-related system. What kind of system do we have in our GTs? I assume its wheel-braking, but I would like to know for sure before I pull off the road into some sand or wet grass, or try rolling over a patch of ice, etc. Pretty sure I won't take it rock-crawling...
 

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As I recall reading before, the trac system controls the ABS system and the electronic throttle. If a wheel starts spinning it brakes that wheel and if your rpms get to high it will cut the throttle back. You should be able to find this info on the ford site, I think that is where I read about it.
 

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My experience...

For what it's worth, I've experimented a little to see when TC would kick in. I've never dropped the hammer from a dead stop on a wet road, but I have hit 2nd hard a couple of times, once in the rain (when no one was around me) and once when it was fairly dry, but still a bit damp. I'm sure most everyone has seen that TC doesn't prevent a pretty good tire screech in 2nd on a dry road. On the rain soaked road, it kicked in pretty fast, which is a good thing. On the nearly dry road, I almost went sideways, but backed off myself before this happened. So, it seems that it only works aggresively when it's really slick. What I'd like to know (and don't want to try) is if you nailed it going around a corner when it was wet, would it kick in enough to keep you from going around? Of course, the wise 'Stang driver knows what he's piloting, and respects it enough to know what trouble he could get into when doing stupid things...
 

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On the way home from the stealership with mine (in the rain), I gave it some gas in 2nd around a corner, spun the rears and got hella sideways. I lifted my foot while the rear wheels were still rotating faster than the fronts.
 

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In my experience, unless you do something really stupid with it, the TCS should keep you out of trouble. I got my car in January, and drove it through most of the winter up here. Even on ice or snow, going around a corner, I had a tough time going sideways with TCS on. Turn it off, and it'll go anywhere...:eyepoppin
 

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yeah, often sideway AND backwards!
 

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rainman said:
For what it's worth, I've experimented a little to see when TC would kick in. I've never dropped the hammer from a dead stop on a wet road, but I have hit 2nd hard a couple of times, once in the rain (when no one was around me) and once when it was fairly dry, but still a bit damp. I'm sure most everyone has seen that TC doesn't prevent a pretty good tire screech in 2nd on a dry road. On the rain soaked road, it kicked in pretty fast, which is a good thing. On the nearly dry road, I almost went sideways, but backed off myself before this happened. So, it seems that it only works aggresively when it's really slick. What I'd like to know (and don't want to try) is if you nailed it going around a corner when it was wet, would it kick in enough to keep you from going around? Of course, the wise 'Stang driver knows what he's piloting, and respects it enough to know what trouble he could get into when doing stupid things...
I've nailed it going around a corner when it's dry and TCS kicked in... feels like what it does... throttle backs way off even if your foot is still in it... brakes were doing a little something... and of course the TCS gauge light starts flashing. With TCS turned off... you can go around and around...:laughlitt
 

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