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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

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I'm a fan of the Spec that I put in. I went with stage 2 just because I am planning on going bigger later
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How heavy is the pedal?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What brand is the spec 1 you guys are talking about?
 

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That is just eerie...
 

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I have a centerforce clutch and a mostly stock engine. The clutch was there when I bought the car. It is stiff but ok for normal driving. It is a pita when inching along in city traffic, after a few miles your left leg will get tired.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Will a clutch that is going,make the car surge and buck at low rpm's?
 

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id say it depends on what you want to do. if you have bigger and better plans for the car powerwise in the future, id say go with the spec stage 2, but if you dont plan on doing alot more to it powerwise, id say spec stage 1.
 

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It all depends on what you plan on doing with the car. If you plan on putting some bigger numbers down in the future id go with something hefty thats what i did that way when it was time to build my motor it was already done broken in and ready to go. Im running a zoom stage 2 from summit.
 

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I have the RAM HDX and love it. Pedal effort is marginally heavier than stock, but its a good feeling and shifts are solid.
 

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I don't think its heavy at all...

But then again, the cable needed replaced when I got the car.

So when I did the clutch I replaced cable and quadrent. Nice and smooth:bigthumbsup
 

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I have a stock replacement clutch in my Cobra, with 380rwhp it works fine, ask yourself what you spend more time doing, daily driving or beating your car? If it's DD then go stock, if not go heavy duty.
 

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Everyone's choices are different depending on how much power you are making and what your plans are for the car. Clutches are rated by engine torque, not http://www.allfordmustangs.com/forums/#horsepower. Knowing what the torque is in your engine is essential before purchasing a clutch.

Clutch disc material comes basically in 3 choices, Copper/Organic, Kevlar and Ceramic. You can get it with a full face or puck style. Full face is just as it sounds, the disc itself is a full circle. Puck type discs, like a Spec Stage 3, means instead of a full circle face, you have 4, 6 or sometimes 8 pucks with clutch material on them. Puck type discs are prone to chatter and caution should be used when using them on the street. There is also a dual friction disc like a CenterForce (the most well known). Dual friction means one side of the disc is one material and the other side is a different material. The most common is copper/organic on one side and ceramic on the other. I personally refer to these as half of a good clutch because one side is very strong, the other, not really. :hihi:

Copper/Organic is basically like an OE clutch material. Very soft material, can hold up to about 450ft/lbs, easy to drive on the street and will last a long time providing you keep the clutch adjusted properly. Not recommended for strip/race duty. An occasional trip to the track would be fine but anything more than that, this clutch will not hold up.

Kevlar would be the next step up from Copper/Organic. Kevlar (think bullet proof vests) is very strong and can handle up to about 650ft/lbs. It is very street-able and "drives" like a copper/organic disc but is incredibly strong. Kevlar will typically give you 5-7% longer life than copper/organic but it does have a 700 mile breakin period though. Kevlar is a very good choice for those cars that are modded and plan to do most of their driving on the street but with spirited runs at the track as well.

Ceramic (or Carbon Metallic) is at the top of the chain. It is very aggressive material but is very strong. It can easily handle up to 850ft/lbs. It takes some getting use to when driving on the street and IS NOT RECOMMENDED for stock transmissions because it is so aggressive. It will stress and even break a stock transmission if you're not careful. Ceramic tends to be either engaged or not engaged and there is not a lot of "wiggle" room with it. In other words, leave a little gap between you and the car in front of you at the stop light. :hihi: Ceramic does not have a specific breakin period. Ceramic is hard to drive on the street until you get use to the engagement and is recommended for high torque monsters and track use/hard driving.

There is a lot of good information at our website here, Ford Clutch Kits

Whichever clutch you go with, make sure you understand clutch adjustment and get it right or you will ruin not only the new clutch but your transmission as well. An out of adjustment clutch is the number 1 killer of transmissions. :bigthumbsup

Generally you want between 1/8" and 1/4" max gap between the face of the bearing and the fingers on the pressure plate when the pedal is all the way out at the rest position. Anything more than 1/4" and you are not getting full release of the clutch which will destroy a transmission and wear out the clutch in no time flat. Anything less than 1/8" and you run the risk of having the throw out bearing ride the fingers all the time and they are not designed to be constantly spinning all the time.
 
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