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Hey AFM, Im new to the Ford Mustang community and to this website. I've had my 1999 Ford Mustang GT for about 3 years, I had a Honda prior that didnt last long so TECHNICALLY this is my first car. Like I was saying, I have had my 1999 Ford Mustang GT for about 3 years almost and it has been fairly good to me, only had a couple repairs. I was actually interested in looking for an easy to understand manual/book that actually could show me how to repair basic things such as alternator or stuff like that. Anyone know of any? Thanks for the help in advance.
 

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Anything you want to repair or modify can be found on the internet with a google search and 15 spare minutes of your time.
I rebuilt a whole rear end, installed a supercharger, P&P'ed a TB/Plenum, fixed a leaking intake manifold gasket, installed headers, and about a ton of other crap in the last 9 months with no previous experience with wrenching on Mustangs. Search the web. Search this site. Search other forums. Buy a Chilton manual, or keep showing up here and ask questions, dude. There's no shortage of info on how to fix these cars.

:bigthumbsup

-RAbbit
 

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Welcome. Whether a book will help or not, and which one to get depends on how much you know, how involved you want to get, and what tools and ability to use them you have. The best way to go is a factory service manual, but that won't help a beginner, it assumes the user knows a certain amount of stuff first. A haynes or chiltons isn't bad for a beginner, but once you get to a certain point they are only good as toilet paper. I will now go shoot myself for recommending those 2, but for a beginner they and google will be the best place to start.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Ill check them out

Welcome. Whether a book will help or not, and which one to get depends on how much you know, how involved you want to get, and what tools and ability to use them you have. The best way to go is a factory service manual, but that won't help a beginner, it assumes the user knows a certain amount of stuff first. A haynes or chiltons isn't bad for a beginner, but once you get to a certain point they are only good as toilet paper. I will now go shoot myself for recommending those 2, but for a beginner they and google will be the best place to start.

Yea well in terms of my ability, I can change oil, tire, battery and a couple minor things but that's about it, dont really have much tools at all either. Im a rookie, newbie however u want to call it. Usually had my cousin fix my ride or took it to the shop by cousin moved to the West Coast and im tired of giving these thieving mechanics my hard earned money for things I could probably do in minutes and for cheap. Why you gonna shoot yourself for recommending those? lolz! they that bad? Ill still definitely check them out buddy, thanks alot, appreciate it. Any other suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
damn dont shoot yourself...no yet at least, feel free after we end this conversation though lol jk jk
 

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Once you get to a certain point those manuals are pure crap, either wipe you butt or start a fire with them, that's all they are good for. But for a beginner it'll get you going in the right direction and keep you from spending money on mechanics that charge a ton. The factory service manual is great, but for a beginner it won't do much good at all and its pricey. Best advice I can give is exercise patience when working on your car, and get GOOD tools. Craftsman are pretty good, as are mac and snap-on, but they are not cheap. Cheap tools are usually crap, and you can add to their cost copious amounts of lost skin, busted knuckles, etc. Good tools are a great investment. I still have a craftsman ratchet and socket set that is 25 years old at least, and I use it all the time, never let me down. But I also have a LOT more than what comes in a basic set, like every socket, extension, and the like known to mankind. The right tools make a difficult job much easier and an easy job a cakewalk. Part of why mechanics charge ~$70/hour is the have about $40k in tools.
 

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+1 on the tools. snap on IMHO is the best out there by far, but they also carry the steepest price.

for the everyday DIY'er mechanic craftsman and husky (home depot's craftsman) seem to be the best around. they both carry a lifetime replacement warranty on all of their hand tools. you just bring a broken tool into the store they will literally give you a replacement to walk out with.

my husky ratchet literally exploded when i put a 3 foot pipe over it to get more leverage when working with my rear LCAs. i brought it to home depot and they didn't even question me or ask me for a receipt. the guy literally just walked over to the hand tools and handed me a new ratchet. i decided to buy a breaker bar too and use that instead of a ratchet :rollgrin:.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
+1 on the tools. snap on IMHO is the best out there by far, but they also carry the steepest price.

for the everyday DIY'er mechanic craftsman and husky (home depot's craftsman) seem to be the best around. they both carry a lifetime replacement warranty on all of their hand tools. you just bring a broken tool into the store they will literally give you a replacement to walk out with.

my husky ratchet literally exploded when i put a 3 foot pipe over it to get more leverage when working with my rear LCAs. i brought it to home depot and they didn't even question me or ask me for a receipt. the guy literally just walked over to the hand tools and handed me a new ratchet. i decided to buy a breaker bar too and use that instead of a ratchet :rollgrin:.

Ok thank you for the advice, advice appreciated
 

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Once you get to a certain point those manuals are pure crap, either wipe you butt or start a fire with them, that's all they are good for. But for a beginner it'll get you going in the right direction and keep you from spending money on mechanics that charge a ton. The factory service manual is great, but for a beginner it won't do much good at all and its pricey. Best advice I can give is exercise patience when working on your car, and get GOOD tools. Craftsman are pretty good, as are mac and snap-on, but they are not cheap. Cheap tools are usually crap, and you can add to their cost copious amounts of lost skin, busted knuckles, etc. Good tools are a great investment. I still have a craftsman ratchet and socket set that is 25 years old at least, and I use it all the time, never let me down. But I also have a LOT more than what comes in a basic set, like every socket, extension, and the like known to mankind. The right tools make a difficult job much easier and an easy job a cakewalk. Part of why mechanics charge ~$70/hour is the have about $40k in tools.

Ok well I appreciate all the advice, thanks alot. A little weary though since I basically have no experience with working with my car, except for basic stuff. Maybe I should just take a couple auto courses at the community college down the street, I dont want to brake or damage anything. what do u think?
 

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Classes can't hurt, unless the teacher is a crappy mechanic. Just remember, at some point everyone was new to working on cars, you gotta start somewhere.
 

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Classes can't hurt, unless the teacher is a crappy mechanic. Just remember, at some point everyone was new to working on cars, you gotta start somewhere.

Very true. I will try and get the books and the tools first. Ill keep u posted. Thanks again.
 
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