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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2011 mustang 3.7 and I’m in the middle of swapping the trans for the MT82 from a 2014. After pulling the trans out and getting ready to throw in the mt82 I noticed one of the bolt holes where the trans mounts to the trans support bracket is dented (there are 3 bolts that go into the support bracket). Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance
 

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@Sam2011v6
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I’ll move Your thread to the correct sub-forum.
 
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Doesn’t look like a treaded hole, if so, maybe you can clean it up with a drill?


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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Can it be re-threaded?
I was thinking using a tap on it but I’m not sure a it will even fit in to the hole. I’ll post a better picture now.

Doesn’t look like a treaded hole, if so, maybe you can clean it up with a drill?


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It is threaded. I’ll post a better picture now

8B232134-93B1-4428-B881-DF6DFD6261E7.jpeg

I have a 2011 mustang 3.7 and I’m in the middle of swapping the trans for the MT82 from a 2014. After pulling the trans out and getting ready to throw in the mt82 I noticed one of the bolt holes where the trans mounts to the trans support bracket is dented (there are 3 bolts that go into the support bracket). Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance
Can it be re-threaded?
 

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Right. So I’m not a machinist but I’m sure it’s possible to drill out the old threads creating a new hole then use a threader to create new grooves. Of course the new hole and threads would be a different diameter right?

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Right. So I’m not a machinist but I’m sure it’s possible to drill out the old threads creating a new hole then use a threader to create new grooves. Of course the new hole and threads would be a different diameter right?
What do you think about being able to just drill out a hole in the section where the threads are dented and just using the threads in the back? Basically just removing the damaged threads
 

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What do you think about being able to just drill out a hole in the section where the threads are dented and just using the threads in the back? Basically just removing the damaged threads
That’s what I’d probably do. Just make sure to run a thread chaser through there, and be careful not to over torque the bolt when installing.

Also, take a flat file to the thread boss so that the mating surface doesn’t cause a misalignment and put more stress on the threads.
 

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I would just rethread it as suggested.
 
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I see the threads now. Rethreading will be needed, maybe you can drill it out and put a thread insert in there?


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Multiple people have mentioned this but do NOT drill it out to the next bigger size or remove those threads as that is totally unnecessary in this case. It's just the very end and a small section on about 1 to 3 threads. Drilling it out will make it weaker, it's more work, you'd have to buy another bolt, and it's overkill. You'll get better results just fixing what's there.
Just carefully take a dremel or a drill bit(dremel would be better as you will have more control and a drill bit could spin around easily into the undamaged section) to grind the first few threads only where it's flattened in and then take a tap or a thread chaser and run it in past the deformed section. It's really that simple to do and it will only take a couple minutes. You will have all the threads back and you will be able to use the right bolt. You should grind away a little of the pushed up section on the flat part where it meets up to the bracket so it sits flush.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Multiple people have mentioned this but do NOT drill it out to the next bigger size or remove those threads as that is totally unnecessary in this case. It's just the very end and a small section on about 1 to 3 threads. Drilling it out will make it weaker, it's more work, you'd have to buy another bolt, and it's overkill. You'll get better results just fixing what's there.
Just carefully take a dremel or a drill bit(dremel would be better as you will have more control and a drill bit could spin around easily into the undamaged section) to grind the first few threads only where it's flattened in and then take a tap or a thread chaser and run it in past the deformed section. It's really that simple to do and it will only take a couple minutes. You will have all the threads back and you will be able to use the right bolt. You should grind away a little of the pushed up section on the flat part where it meets up to the bracket so it sits flush.
Got it! Thanks everyone for the help and suggestions :) this was my first post on here and it was nice to see people are willing to help
 

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Got it! Thanks everyone for the help and suggestions :) this was my first post on here and it was nice to see people are willing to help
I would probably use a counter sink to remove the dent and work to get a tap of the correct size and pitch properly aligned to clean up the beginning threads. Also, I'm not sure what size tap is (it looks like a fine thread)., and its not clear if the hole goes all the way through. If its a through hole, I'd counter sink the front to remove the dent, and run the appropriate tap through from the back and fix the threads up front. Ford had an issue with spark plugs on aluminum heads, and the made a tool to rethread from the front die, which depending on your bolt size, might actually work for you. Good luck
 

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My first thought was also to use a countersink bit. But then I got to wondering how much chatter you'd get and whether that could cause unintended damage.

I think what I would do first would be to start with a flat file to square up the flat surface. Then with a small round hand file, knock down the metal that's been upset into the hole before doing any final clean-up with the countersink.

I can't tell if that's a blind hole or not, but if it isn't you'll need to be very careful getting the tap started.

The threads are almost certainly metric, and if the bolt that's supposed to go there isn't available there are thread pitch gauges (SAE shown, but there's one for metric as well)
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