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I have read about people having problems with their HIDs when they turn the car on. My problem is different. I have bi-xenon headlights (4 ballasts) and h3 fogs (2 ballasts) wired up with 3 relays in my car. The only time my HIDs flicker are when I crank the stereo up, they flicker with the bass. This seems to be a different problem than most of the others I have read about. Any ideas? Thanks
 

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I have read about people having problems with their HIDs when they turn the car on. My problem is different. I have bi-xenon headlights (4 ballasts) and h3 fogs (2 ballasts) wired up with 3 relays in my car. The only time my HIDs flicker are when I crank the stereo up, they flicker with the bass. This seems to be a different problem than most of the others I have read about. Any ideas? Thanks
You can buy some of those capacitors for large stereos. I think Crutchfield sells them. They store power in them for the stereo to use specifically for what you talk about...they supply the system with power so those huge power draws from the subs don't make your lights dim. I think you wire them inline on your positive battery cable. Capacitors at Crutchfield.com
 

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Get yourself a quality capacitor, there easy to install. This will fix your problem.
 

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A better solution would be to upgrade your big 3 wires under the hood. Run a 1/0 gauge wire from your alternator to battery (+) (put in a car audio fuse of at least 100 amps on this one), Alternator to Ground, and Battery (-) to ground. These will serve as redundant cables to decrease resistance and increase the charging efficiency of your battery and the ability of your alternator to quickly get current to your lights and stereo. the fuse will protect your circuits in case of a surge, but make sure to leave your old wires in also. This solution is usually cheaper than a capacitor and will serve you better in the long run. If you still have problems, then add a capacitor.

Given that you have enough current (unless you are running 1000w, you have enough), what is happening right now is basically the equivalent of hooking up a garden hose to a fire truck (aka your charging system). You can install a small reservoir and secondary pump (capacitor) downstream of the garden hose and hook it up to a fire hose and that will give you enough pressure for high intensity in short bursts up to the capacity of the small reservoir, or you could eliminate the constricting factor on the system altogether by replacing the garden hose with a fire hose. Then you don't need the secondary pump and reservoir at all.
 
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