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I would pop the hood and see if there is a label under the hood restricting sale in California.
I'm certain the emission requirements dictate different tunes that would affect performance.
That's a certainty right there. CA has had tighter emissions standards for decades. I thought this was common knowledge within our community. Anyway, any new car destined for sale in CA has to meet their cleaner requirements. Since the market there is so big, having such a large population, car manufacturers actually save money by making only the cars going to CA with the more expensive emissions equipment. It's been that way for a long time now.
This will definitely tame power to make a cleaner burn in CA. There is no doubt in that regard. How much power and where in the RPM range that it is sacrificed is all that is in question here. I'm sure it's only a few HP and ft lbs but it would be interesting to know.
 

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Actually new cars sold in CT must meet the California emissions standard. Since I bought mine in Michigan, I was able to register it in CT.
 
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Cars are tuned for emissions for normal driving conditions not full throttle romps. There should be no difference in the tune for Full throttle. There might be a difference in the part throttle tuning however.

Cars do not have to meet emissions standards at full throttle.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Cars are tuned for emissions for normal driving conditions not full throttle romps. There should be no difference in the tune for Full throttle. There might be a difference in the part throttle tuning however.

Cars do not have to meet emissions standards at full throttle.
You make a very good point, I didn't even think of that but it makes perfect sense.
 

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I also have one of the underhood non-California badges of honor - car was originally registered in Michigan, and I bought it out of North Carolina. A bureaucrat at my California DMV saw that sticker and insisted that I "could not have this in California." Lame and wrong - you can buy and import to Calif. a federal emissions car (at least gas powered) with 7,500 or more miles on the odo. Anyway - I've driven a few S197 V6 convertibles, including my own, and if my 'naughty' non-Calif. emissions rig has more oomph, it's *very* little extra. Unfortunately!

From my research, though, bringing a non-Calif. emissions diesel pickup into Calif. would be harder than hand-building one from a boulder of iron ore. *That* bureaucratic process looks like it would suck something awful.
 

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The California Special package has nothing to do with selling the car in California. Most CS cars will have a sticker
under the hood just like mine.
 

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The California Special package has nothing to do with selling the car in California. Most CS cars will have a sticker
under the hood just like mine.
I thought for sure at least for the 05-09 body style that to buy a Mustang GT in California that it had to be the California package as it had 4 cats instead of the regular 2.

That is just my understanding though and shoot what do I know I live on the east coast and only know that info as a dealer over here told me that. I take what they say normally with a grain of salt as half of it is them blowing smoke up your butt to make a sell anyways. haha

BUT now you have me really wondering. Maybe we can get some California Mustang owners to provide info on laws and regulations and also maybe even get some California Special owners to chime in and post a pic of their stickers. Would be interesting info to know.
 

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Just going through my notes from my purchase this summer and I wrote that the CARB (California Air Resources Board) engineer I talked to - when I panicked because the dealer didn't tell me I had purchased a 'federal' rather than "California emissions" car until it was being loaded on the truck - said the California cars have an extra oxygen sensor. But that doesn't make sense because then all the California (and New England/DC) cars would have a different intake manifold. Which makes zero sense, right?
 

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My GT/CS has that sticker too. I guess my Stang isn't a true "California Special."

JediDave
 

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Discussion Starter #32
My GT/CS has that sticker too. I guess my Stang isn't a true "California Special."

JediDave
That's one BA looking ride you've got there... :grin:
 

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crjackson2134:

Thanks man!!
Scar looks like a real scary beast....my CS would turn and run back to the beach!:crying:

JediDave
 

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I also have that sticker under my hood. Mine was originally sold new in South Carolina but the last owner brought it to California where I got it used. You can register a car here that's not Cali-emissions certified and it'll pass smog/inspection but all new cars on the lots have to have the stricter emissions setup. Same deal with the Taurus I used to have- also not Cali-emissions certified.
I guess I'll be looking for that sticker under both hoods just for the fun of it this week. I wish we had a tech. on this board that knows what the real deal is.
amabhy is correct, the only time the Federal vs. California emissions matters is when the car is sold BRAND NEW from the dealer. California compliant cars can be sold brand new in all 50 states, Federal compliant cars can be sold brand new in every state EXCEPT California and New York, however after the initial sale at the OE dealer, both California and Federal compliant cars can be sold/bought/registered in any of the 50 states.
 

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amabhy is correct, the only time the Federal vs. California emissions matters is when the car is sold BRAND NEW from the dealer. California compliant cars can be sold brand new in all 50 states, Federal compliant cars can be sold brand new in every state EXCEPT California and New York, however after the initial sale at the OE dealer, both California and Federal compliant cars can be sold/bought/registered in any of the 50 states.
Only California compliant cars can be sold new in Connecticut also.

DEEP: LEV II

I had to research this when I bought mine. Since I bought it new and registered it in Michigan (in order to drive it home) and then registered it in CT when I got back home, I was exempt from this standard.
 

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Actually new cars sold in CT must meet the California emissions standard. Since I bought mine in Michigan, I was able to register it in CT.
There are 13 states that subscribe to the California requirements. I live in Mass which is one of them.

I also believe the cars are all exactly the same and the reason that they put a California sticker only on those cars that are being shipped to the 13 states that subscribe to California requirements has to do with certification fees that have to be paid to CARB for each approved car sold.

My 13 Focus ST came with a non California sticker. A few months after delivery I got a letter from Ford with instructions to cover the existing sticker with the enclosed California sticker.

Dave
 

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There are 13 states that subscribe to the California requirements. I live in Mass which is one of them.

I also believe the cars are all exactly the same and the reason that they put a California sticker only on those cars that are being shipped to the 13 states that subscribe to California requirements has to do with certification fees that have to be paid to CARB for each approved car sold.

My 13 Focus ST came with a non California sticker. A few months after delivery I got a letter from Ford with instructions to cover the existing sticker with the enclosed California sticker.

Dave
Dave, I believe you and the others posting similar views are right. I pulled down some FMC emission certificates and they are different. One is for CARB and lists emission results and the other cert is just an EPA cert stipulating conformance to the clean air act.

Besides the nominal fee that might be tacked on, there are subtle differences in the emission warranty coverage for both.

I would have to conclude that there is none to minimum performance impact on what certification accompanies the car with the exception that the gasoline formulations in locations with tightly controlled pollution levels may have some impact.

The charades with the certifications is a mystery to me because you can still bring in a new car to CA from out of state after the prescribed wait time of 7 months I think and get it certified at a smog station and register it in CA.

Erik
 

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The interesting part in that last post is found in the last line.


From Wikipedia:


Due to its preexisting standards and particularly severe motor vehicle air pollution problems in the Los Angeles metropolitan area, the U.S. state of California has special dispensation from the federal government to promulgate its own automobile emissions standards. Other states may choose to follow either the national standard or the stricter California standards. States adopting the California standards include Arizona (2012 model year),[1] Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Mexico (2011 model year), New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington, as well as the District of Columbia.[2][3] Such states are frequently referred to as "CARB states" in automotive discussions because the regulations are defined by the California Air Resources Board.
The EPA has adopted the California emissions standards as a national standard by the 2016 model year[4] and is collaborating with California regulators on stricter national emissions standards for model years 2017–2025.[5]


Who-ever it was that said "car companies simply set up all cars to the stricter standard of CARB"......technically incorrect for the question asked in the OP.......but starting with model year 2016.......it would be a correct statement.....not by choice but rather by way of the new standards adopted by the Federal Authorities..
 

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I'd be interested to know if it isn't the car but instead the gasoline available that might make a car IN a Carb state a little weak on performance.


Compuer controlled ignition and 11:1 compression.........it's not hard to imagine any car, not just a Coyote powered car, with higher compression levels might make more power at WOT with higher octane gasoline available.


I noticed Maine and Mass on that list of 13 states that have adopted the CARB standard......I'm not sure about Massachusetts but I go into Maine often enough to avoid a "fill up" when-ever possible......I can get 93 octane gasoline in New Hampshire at almost every gas station......yet in Maine I can't find anything higher than 91. I have to imagine that might make a difference in power levels any individual Coyote motor might be able to make before timing is retarded to control engine "knock".
 
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